The Northern Lights in Powertex

Aurora Borealis in Powertex
Northern Lights using Powertex

Designer: Donna Mcghie

In this article I will show you how to recreate my interpretation of the Northern Lights using Powertex.

The Northern Lights, or Aurora Borealis have always fascinated me. Like the ocean which was the inspiration for my last blog, they have that ethereal, slightly unworldly quality. They are a reminder of just how wonderful nature can be.

The lovely Tracey Evans at Powertex HQ asked if I could use lots of colour and texture in this article. I used the gorgeous pigments to create the fluorescent greens and pinks for the sky. Textured stone art clay was added to signify water.

One thing I hadn’t realised before doing some research for this article, is that the Northern Lights also occur during the daytime.  However the human eye is unable to see them at these times as the sun is too strong for them to show up.

Materials List:

Cover the canvas

Powertex base for Northern Lights Blog
I mixed Sherbert Dip Pigment with White Fabric Hardener to create a luminous base

I roughly covered my canvas using a mixture of Sherbert Dip Pigment and White Powertex for the sky, and White and Blue Powertex for the sea.

Create crackles

Northern lights sky created using powertex pigments
I also added some Violet Valentine to the sky

After spraying with Black Bister I blasted with a hair dryer to create crackles, and used a palette knife to scrape back and allow the yellows to shine through.

Stone Art sea

Powertex Clay added to canvas for Northern Lights Blog
I had added in some trees in the background here, but they didn’t look right so I faded them out using my pigments over the top.

I used segments of Stone Art clay to create the illusion of a choppy sea. Powertex pearl pigments reflect the colours in the sky.

Tree textures

Powertex acrylic ink used to create trees on canvas
Rather than having the trees all along the shoreline, which didn’t look right, I opted to use an asymmetrical composition instead.

Putting a cluster of trees fading downwards, I painted some corrugated cardboard with acrylic and used a stubby brush to indicate branches.

Highlight waves

Powertex Power Wax to give highlights to waves on Stone Art Clay
Make Stone Art clay by mixing a small quantity of Stone Art with some Powertex until it forms a dough like substance

I liked the way the Stone Art clay waves were curling and decided to highlight this using Powercolor Titanium White Pigment.

Powerwax sky

I used Powertex Powerwax for a deep shine on the canvas
Powerwax is perfect for adding extra depth and shine.

Finally I added some extra depth to the colours in the sky using Powerwax and pigment. I dip my finger in the wax, then the pigment and gently rub on in a circular movement.

Using the Powerwax in the final stage really helped to bring the picture to life. I was able to create beautiful swirling patterns in the sky using the amazingly vibrant Pearl Pigments which gave just the ethereal atmosphere I was hoping for.

Northern Lights in Powertex

My finished Northern Lights Powertex Canvas

That’s all from me for this month. I hope you have enjoyed this step by step article, and would love to see any Northern Lights inspired artwork you create over on our Facebook page. Please feel free to leave any comments, (especially nice ones).

If you are in the Southampton area and fancy coming along to a workshop you can find all my upcoming events on the blog section of www.artandmurals.co.uk. My Facebook page also has my events listed.

Take care, and see you next month 🙂

Under The Sea Powertex Sculptures

Powertex shark by Donna Mcgghie

By Donna Mcghie

What lies under the sea can be both beautiful and terrifying in equal measure.

I decided to make my own homage to the 1970’s film Jaws for my first underwater sculpture for this article. Thanks to this film I always feel a primeval sense of unease when swimming in deep water, and that music hovers around at the back of my brain. However at the same time I also have an exhilarating rush of adrenaline. My senses feel alert and vibrant. 

Under the sea, Powertex shark by Donna Mcghie
Although I am scared of sharks, I have grown rather fond of this gnarly old Powertex king of the seas

Powertex Stone art mixed with black Powertex fabric hardener was the perfect medium for this gnarled, battle scarred shark.

Powertex zip mouth on shark
An old zip works perfectly for his pointy little teeth
Powertex shark on base
The black metal base makes the perfect base for this powertex sculpture

The sea bed can be an eerily beautiful setting. Mixed media was used to create this under water 3D canvas.

The eerily beautiful seabed that is home to my shark

The illusion of the sea was created by using a mixture of blue and white Powertex Fabric Hardener sprayed with blue bister. I created the spiky coral by soaking Powercotton in transparent Powertex fabric hardener. Shells that are not conventionally pretty added the finishing touch.

Beware of Beautiful Powertex Mermaids

Powertex mermaid by Donna Mcghie
I used bits of lace and paperdecoration to add texture

Many legends and myths are connected to the sea. One of the most enduring myths is that of the mermaid.

My mermaid canvas was created by swirling blue and white Powertex fabric hardener onto a canvas. Bister was then added and blasted with a hair dryer.

My mermaid started to take shape when I poured green Powertex fabric hardener to create the shape of a tail.

I mixed Powertex terracotta and white fabric hardeners together to create a flesh tone, whilst Yellow ochre fabric hardener worked well for the hair.

Davy Jones’s Locker

There are many versions of who Davy Jones was, and just as many theories as to just how he ended up lurking at the bottom of the sea.

Maybe he was seduced by the beauty of a passing mermaid. Her beauty having lured him down to the murky depths below.

Powertex under the sea
My Davy Jones sports a jacket I spied in a charity shop, soaked in Bronze Powertex Fabric Hardener

Our facebook page The Powertex Studio is a great place for ideas and motivation. You can also inspire others by sharing your own makes.

You can also see more of my work and find out about my workshops on my website www.artandmurals.co.uk.

My last month’s blog was inspired by the artist Vincent Van Gogh

That’s all for now. As this is an inspiration blog I have not done step by steps, but if you would like more detailed instructions I am happy to provide them. Please leave me a comment below if you like what you see, and remember to take care, especially when swimming in deep water.

After all, you never know what is lurking beneath.

Powertex Fairy Lights Bottle

Van Gogh Inspired Powertex Bottle

by Donna Mcghie

Van Gogh Powertex bottle
I was inspired by my favourite artist Vincent Van Gogh

For this month’s Powertex step by step article I was asked to use fairy lights to create a lighting feature. So it just had to be a powertex fairy lights bottle!

The thought that immediately sprang into my mind was a painting by one of my favourite artists, Vincent Van Gogh.  I love his style of swirling, vibrant colours, and thought this would work really well with Powertex.

The painting I decided to pay homage to was Starry Starry Night.  I loved the thought of twinkly fairy lights shining through a swirling Powertex sky. 

Where to start

I decided to use a bottle as my base, and to use Powertex Paperdecoration as my main medium.  I love how it organically has all the textures and swirls I was hoping to recreate.  Paper dec  would also conveniently give me lots of gaps for those starry lights to shine through.

Powertex bottle light project
Powertex paperdecoration is just perfect for this project

There were some challenges with my idea.  Such as how to keep the glass showing through the gaps nice and clear.  But a bit of thinking outside the box overcame these, and I am really happy with the end result.

I’ve always loved Van Gogh, but fell in love with him even more after reading a book of his letters to his brother Theo. He wrote, like he painted, from his heart and soul.

Materials List

Step by Step

Wrap your bottle in bubble wrap to ensure the glass does not get too smeared to allow the lights to shine through.

prep for Powertex bottle project
I also wrapped my paper decoration round to ensure it was wide enough. Be sure to leave a few strands of this separate to use later.

Carefully soak your Powertex paper decoration in blue powertex. Lay it flat and swirl some yellow ochre powertex over the top.

blue and yellow powertex fabric hardener
the yellow swirls are prominent in the original painting

Now gently wrap the coloured paper decoration around the bubble wrapped bottle and leave to dry.

powertex blue paperdecoration wrapped around bottle
Ideally leave overnight to harden

Once dry, remove the bubble wrap and place the paper decoration back over your bottle, along with whatever embellishment you have chosen for the moon.

powertex blue moon bottle
I used a fabric button soaked in Blue Powertex for the moon. Also added some material strips around the bottle neck

I made white swirls using tiny strips of paper decoration soaked in transparent Powertex, and also added my twisted willow securing in place with strips of material.

powertex twisted willow
the twisted willow fits in perfectly with this design

Finally I enhanced the whole thing with dry brushing, and also added some minute stars, gems and eco friendly glitter.

powertex fairy lights bottle
Back view of my Powertex Light Bottle

I’m really pleased with how this powertex fairy lights bottle turned out. The powertex pigments I used to enhance the design were Colortrix Silver, Powerpearl and Terragreen, Powercolor Titanium White and Pearl Pigment Sherbet Dip.

I chose to pay tribute to Van Gogh, but I do think there are so many other artists whose style could be used for these bottle lights. I’d love to see any versions you come up with over on The Powertex Studio Facebook Group. If you are inspired by this, you might also want to check out my last blog which also has a painterly theme.

Thank you so much for reading.

If you would like to see more of what I get up to you can follow me on facebook, or check out my website. I look forward to seeing you again in June. Donna 🙂

Powertex Roses on Canvas

Designer: Donna Mcghie

How to paint beautiful roses with blended pastel colours using Powertex

Powertex painted roses on canvas
Painted Powertex Roses on Canvas

One of my favourite photos is of my daughter, face painted as a fairy and for this article I decided to incorporate this into a Powertex roses on canvas painting. (I do tend to use family quite a lot for inspiration, as you can see in my January blog for Powertex UK which was done in memory of my nan.

I achieved this by photocopying my chosen image onto a piece of plain rice paper and then adhered it onto a canvas using powertex easy varnish

Top tip

Other ways you can achieve a similar effect are by using Powertex Powerprint
or alternatively choose one of the gorgeous faces available in the paper selection

Materials Used:

Blue, Grey and White Powertex Fabric Hardener

Powertex Easy Varnish

Rasberry Sorbet Acrylic Paint

Mint Jelly Acrylic Paint

Black Powercolor Powertex Pigment

Powercolor Lime Green Pigment

Interference Red Powder Pigment

Colortricx Power Pearl Powder Pigment

Powertex Easy Structure Paste

Powertex One Stroke Roses

As an ex face painter, one thing that is guaranteed to bring the wow factor to any design is a rose painted in the one stroke style. This method uses different colours blended together on the same brush to create the effect of highlights and low lights. I love the pastel effect it can create on the petals.

Gorgeous Pastel Effects can be achieved by painting with Powertex

To achieve this look you will need a flat brush, Easy Varnish and a selection of colours in either Powertex Hardener or you can use the gorgeous Acrylic paints available from the Website.

How to Achieve the One Stroke Effect

Paint thick stripes in the colours of your choice onto a separate sheet of paper. Always have a thin edge of white to achieve the highlight effect

Carefully load up a flat brush with the colour combination, being sure to keep that crisp white edge. I like to dip my brush in Easy Varnish first as this helps achieve a smooth blend in the colours.


Step one. Do a circle of background petals. Be sure to let this dry before moving onto step two

Step two. Place the brush down, and then twist slightly as you move around to create the rose shape. It does take some practice, but once you get the knack you will love it

Once you feel ready to, move onto your canvas and have some fun. I also added some texture with lime green pigment mixed in with some easy structure, before dry brushing with Interference Red and Power Pearl Pigments.

I love the ethereal effect of the finished piece


That’s all for now folks

Thank you so much for reading. I would love to see your powertex paintings over on our facebook group The Powertex Studio

If you would like to see more of what I get up to, please do pop over to my facebook page or my website which gives details of all my workshops local to Southampton.

Powertex Art Doll MDF Kit

mixed media powertex art doll using rice paper
There are no rules for these Art Dolls, other than have fun creating!

Where to start with an Art Doll

If I am completely honest, when I first opened my new Powertex Art Doll MDF Template I was a little bit daunted. I had never even heard of the term Art Doll before. And was a little bit worried that I would not be able to do it justice.

I got in touch with Tracey Evans at Powertex HQ. And asked her if there are any rules I should be adhering to when it comes to creating an Art Doll. Nope, she relied, no rules whatsoever.

Well, that was music to my ears. No rules meant that I could absolutely go to town with my rather bonkers imagination right? Right Tracey confirmed. Within no time at all, my reservations morphed into excitement.

This was going to be fun!

Art Deco Theme for inspiration

I started off by gently removing all mdf cut outs from the template. And having a bit of a play around with them.

I used some Transparent Powertex to fix the square frame together. And thought that this would fit nicely over one of the faces, available in the Powertex Rice Papers.

I had some gorgeous turquoise feathers that I had picked up some time ago. As soon as I played around with placing these on my design, a vague concept started to form in my mind. I was going to go Art Deco. I wanted my Art Doll to look like something you would stumble across whilst rummaging through an old attic.

How to start your Art Doll

Using the turquoise as a base for my colour scheme, I painted all my mdf pieces with white Powertex. I then took my oblong backdrop and poured small amounts of blue Powertex and yellow in dribbles onto it. Whilst this was still wet I then sprayed with blue bister and blasted with a hair dryer. This created an interesting texture on which to base my design.


mixed media powertex backdrop
Although very little of this back drop shows through on the finished design, I’m pleased I did it, as it set the mood for the look I was aiming for

I used the same technique for the frame for the face. However, I left the inside of this white so that I could stick on my face and it would show up nicely. (I didn’t want the face to look too pristine. So when I was dry brushing at the end I purposely added a bit of white to age the photo slightly.)

Mixed media rice paper powertex art doll
I deliberately added some white powercolour to help with the aged photo effect

I added the same face but smaller to the mdf shape, then adhered to the top of the oblong template. Next I added a shabby halo made of a scrap of gold coloured metal. To adhere everything I used Powertex Transparent Hardener. I wanted to add some interest to the wing shapes at the top. So I used the negative shapes from the template I had taken them from. This formed a stencil which I could spray some bister through.

bister stencils for powertex mixed media art doll
I also added on some real white feathers to add even more texture

I left all my mdf pieces overnight to dry and ensure they were securely adhered in place.

The next day I dry brushed using pearl white, white and copper powertex pigments to add to the ageing process.

My final step was to add on some of my beloved bling. Especially those gorgeous turquoise feathers which had been the inspiration for the Art Deco look.

Powertex mixed media Art Doll
My finished Powertex Art Doll

I honestly cannot say how much I enjoyed making this. Once I had put my fears to one side and embraced the freedom of just going for it.

If you would like to share your own creations, the Powertex team would love to have a look over at our facebook page The Powertex Studio.

Need more inspiration for your Art doll kit, take a look at some of the other articles from Design Team members to spark your imagination here is Abigail’s and Anne’s interpretation.

Thanks so much for reading.

I’m Donna and you can see more of my work over at www.artandmurals.co.uk

Step by step to techniques used to create a Powertex Box – Donna Mcghie

Hello and a very Happy New Year to everyone.

One of my resolutions for 2019 is to try and catch up with the modern age by getting to grips with videos in my blogs.   As you can also see, my daughter has been very helpful in getting them onto my computer for me, hence the titles of the videos.

What you will need to create your button tin:

Step by Step Instructions and Techniques:

1) As the box I was using was plastic I covered the base section with masking tape and then painted over this with Powertex Hardener so that the material would have something to adhere to.

2) I painted the lid with white gesso

IMG_20181228_171807-01
I painted the lid with white gesso so that my art deco image would show up

3) Once the bottom section was dry enough,  I turned it upside down and proceeded to soak strips of material in the Powertex Fabric Hardener and after squeezing out thoroughly placed them over the base.  At this point I was keeping the material nice and smooth as I laid it on as I wanted a flat bottom for my tin to rest on.

4) I dried this with a hair dryer and once dry enough, turned it over and started to work on my sides.  I wanted more texture on the sides, so scrunched up my fabric and added buttons as well.

IMG_20181229_154032-01
This is  a photo of the side once it has been dry brushed

If you want to you can also do this on the inside of your box.

5) Whilst this was drying off, I started to work on my lid.  I gently tore around the image I wanted to use from the Powertex Art Nouveau Rice Papers.  Then, using a good quality brush I brushed a little of the varnish onto the dried gesso, before carefully placing my image where I wanted it to go.  I then secured this in place by brushing over with a couple of more layers of varnish.  (NB: It is worth using a good quality brush for this as you want the image to be nice and smooth, the Powertex Brushes are perfectly designed for the job).

5) Once my image was in place, I carefully built up a pattern around it.  I wanted the most texture on my lid, so have done a short video to demonstrate how I did this.

6) Once the lid was covered, I added pieces of jewellery from my junk stash.  I also liked the idea of adding a frame, so used a small mdf one, and then, in memory of my nan and her tin, added some more buttons as well.

IMG_20181228_170255-01
I couldn’t resist adding a choker to my lady

7)  I left my box to dry off completely overnight

8) The next day it was time for my favourite part, dry brushing.  I wanted to give the impression of a bronze tin, whilst also subtly incorporating some of the colours on the Art Nouveau image, so I opted to use pigments in Bronze Gold, interference Blue and Interference Red.  Dry brushing is simple once you get used to the technique which is this:

  • Dip your flat brush into a small amount of Powertex Easy Varnish
  • Then dip the same brush into a small amount of whichever Powertex Pigment you have chosen
  • Now wipe the brush off on a sheet of paper towel.  This may counter productive, but it really is worth doing as you will get the best results when the brush is quite dry and will only pick out highlights, rather than smothering your design with thick colour.
  • Now you are ready to very gently, sweep your brush over your design.  Being sure to keep it flat.  You will be amazed at how quickly your design starts to come to life.

My best tip for dry brushing would be to start off gently and gradually build up to the depth of colour you want.

9) I did this over the whole of my tin.

10) And voila!! A rather bog standard plastic chocolate box that was destined to be added to landfill is now a  beautiful button box, in memory of a lovely lady.

IMG_20190102_112733-01
My finished box

I really enjoyed making this, and obviously similar boxes can be transformed in so many different ways – to reflect the personality of whoever you are making it for, or in memory of.

I hope you enjoyed this blog (please excuse the amateur video techniques, I will get better, I promise).  If you create your own version of one of these I would love to see it, and you can post photos on the Powertex Addicts Facebook Page

If you would like to see more about what I do, and why I do it my website page is www.artandmurals.co.uk

We Three Powertex Kings – Powertex Christmas – Donna Mcghie

Powertex Kings
A Blog On How To Create 3 Beautiful Powertex Kings

I did wonder when those lovely people at Powertex HQ told me I was being given ‘We Three Kings’ as my December theme, if they were indulging my love of bling.

I do tend to throw a bit of bling into most things I create, so my mind was buzzing with ideas for this one.

I had picked up some artist dolls in a sale a while ago, who were just perfect for this project.

artist dolls waiting for powertex
These three artist dolls were just begging to play the part of the three kings

I have to admit that I was surprised just how much I had forgotten about who these kings  were.  So I used the site  www.whychristmas.com   to help me out.

Balthazar was the first king I worked on:

IMG_20181207_162400-01
Balthazar – The King of Tarse and Egypt

I painted his face and hands with Black Powertex Fabric Hardener.

I then soaked some natural material in the same hardener, thoroughly wrung out and draped over his body.

I used Powercotton soaked in Powertex for his beard and hair.

Apparently he wears a purple cloak.  This got me excited because I know how wonderful the new violet valentine pigment shows up on black.

I soaked a lovely piece of silky fabric with tassles in the Black Hardener, wrung it out thoroughly and draped this over him to create his cloak.

I wanted to give the impression of Balthazar walking through a windy desert, so to get some movement in his cloak I stuck it onto a plastic bottle to dry overnight.  (I knew I was safe to do this as Powertex won’t stick permanently to plastic).

The next morning I peeled it off and it was staying in that position which was exactly what I wanted.

IMG_20181208_101338-01
He’s looking more like Shakespeare than a biblical king at the moment – but only because he’s not yet got his turban on

The next king on my list was Melchior

IMG_20181207_111529-01
Melchior King of Arabia

I went through the same process with Melchior, only this time using Lead Powertex.  Melchoir apparently had long white hair and a white beard.  I used some tassle for this that I found in a charity shop.

IMG_20181207_162640-01
The back view of Melchior’s flowing locks

Melchior wears a gold cloak, so once dry I used the gorgeous Rich Gold Pigment for dry brushing.

Last but not least, was Caspar

IMG_20181207_105536-01
Caspar, King of Sheba

Caspar has brown hair and a brown beard, so I used Terracotta Powertex Hardener mixed in with a little black as well for the first stages.

For Caspar’s beard and hair I used some synthetic fur I had got from a Scrap Store.  (I knew these figures were’nt for outside use so I decided to try the synthetic fur, and it worked ok).

His crown is simply a small piece I also picked up in the scrap store.  I think with imagination a lot of things can be made into crowns.

Caspar’s cloak is green which once dry would give me the chance to use another gorgeous, fairly new addition of Golden Olive Pigment 

Before each king was left overnight, I  added some bling to their coats.

IMG_20181207_105255-02(1)

I used small boxes wrapped in fabric as their gifts, and also placed the kings on small tiles to give them stability.

I left them all to dry overnight, and the next morning went to down on dry brushing using a variety of gloriously royal pigments from Powertex UK

And behold, my finished Three Kings.

IMG_20181207_113739-01
We 3 Kings, setting off on an epic journey, with cloaks flowing in the wind

There are so many Christmas themed projects you can make using Powertex.  I would love to see your creations over on Powertex Addicts United page.

Wishing everyone a very Happy and Peaceful Christmas, and look forward to seeing you in the New  Year. Donna x

Simple step by step to a cute Powertex Penguin

For this month’s Powertex Blog we were given the theme of winter crafting.

As we are getting towards the end of the year, and I have obviously got lots of lovely new Powertex goodies on my Christmas list (and I have been a fairly good girl) I thought it was a good opportunity to also use up some spare bits I had from previously in the year.

Meet Quentin

Quentin (made using bronze powertex)

Priscilla

Priscilla (made using grey powertex)

and Paulio

Paulio (made using black powertex)

What I used:
Small amount of Powertex Stone Art 
Small amount of Powertex Fabric Hardener
Powertex Colour Pigments
Small amount of Powertex Easy Varnish
Small scraps of fabric
Small Polystyrene Eggs

How I made my Powertex Penguins:

I had a few small polystyrene Easter eggs left over from Easter crafting workshops and projects, and when I looked at these, the image of a cute little penguin appeared in my mind.

Having just finished a unicorn workshop I had a small amount of stone art clay left over, (which was made using bronze powertex) which was just perfect for covering the egg to create a penguin shape.

I had my stone art clay already mixed left over from my previous workshop (if kept in an airtight container it will last for quite some time once mixed up).  But if you are mixing it fresh it is very easy to do (it always reminds me of making pastry)

Simply pour a small amount of your hardener into a tub, and gradually add stone art, little by little, mixing with a pallet knife until a dough like subtance forms.  Roll it into a ball, and keep kneading and rolling until it comes away cleanly from your hands.

I made up three small balls, as I find it easier to work in this way

mix up small balls of stone art clay using Powertex Fabric Hardener and stone art

From here I simply rolled small bits out and covered my egg shape with the clay. I like to create textures in the clay so I used a small stamp to do this as I went.  Be sure to make the base of the egg quite flat so that your penguin is able to stand steadily.

I rolled a smaller ball to create a head shape, then added small rolls flattened out to indicate the wings, and molded a beak which I added to the head.  For eyes you can use any small round beads.  I was making it up as I went along, and had some Powertex sand balls handy so used these, painted black which worked just as well.

Starting to look vaguely penguinesque

It is when you add the colour that the penguins start to come to life.  I used black, white, tequila sunrise and silver, but basically you can use any colour that takes your fancy.  These are fantasy penquins, so use your imagination.

I was quite pleased with Quentin, but something was missing.  My daughter had the solution.  ‘He needs a little scarf’ she told me, and she was right, he did.  So I simply cut up an old scarf from my stash of material, soaked in transparent powertex and wrapped it round him to keep him nice and snug.  The final touch, and purely optional was some frosty glitter.

I was so pleased with him, and with how easy it was to make, that I made up some more stone art clay using some black powertex that had been lingering in the bottom of a bottle, and also some grey and made him a mum and a dad, so now I have my own cute little Powertex Penguin Family

Quentin, Priscilla and Paulio – keeping as snug as possible against that cold wind

These were genuinely quick and easy to make – and a great way to use up any last bits of stone art clay or powertex that you have lying around.

If you decide to make a Powertex Penguin we would love to see your photos over at the facebook page  Powertex Addicts United

You can see more of my makes on my website www.artandmurals.co.ukwww.artandmurals.co.uk 

Step by Step Powertex Zombie Hand

Apart from the time my daughter made me sit through Dawn of the Dead with her, I have never watched a zombie movie in my life, but this for this Halloween I decided to embrace my dark side and have a bit of fun creating a Powertex Zombie Hand.

 

What I used:

1 x Mache Hand (I got mine from Hobbycraft, but they are available in most craft stores)
1 x Powertex Wooden Base
1 x torn off cotton shirt sleeve
Masking Tape
Tin foil
Powertex Fabric Hardener
Various Powertex Pigments
Powertex Easy Varnish
Powertex Bister I used the ready made sprays of red and black, but again any colours will give a good effect
Bag of Halloween Spiders (or whatever else takes your fancy)
Small Tiles if you want to add a bit of weight to the base

What I did:

I made a hole in the base of the mache hand, and placed it over the top of the Powertex Wooden Base, securing it with masking tape.

I then bulked out the top of the base with tin foil so that there was not a sudden edge where the hand met the pole, and covered with masking tape and Powertex.  (It doesn’t matter what colour Powertex you use for this as it will all be covered up anyway.

I painted the hand with Red Powertex Hardener, and then went to town with dribbling Black, Red and Green Powertex on top of this, spraying with my bister and blasting with a hair dryer to create lots of bubbles and textures.   

Top Tip: I keep my old Powertex containers that just have a few dribbles left in them for this purpose, I love a the effect of dribbling and spraying with bister, so absolutely nothing goes to waste by doing this.

I then soaked my torn sleeve in Black Powertex – being sure to keep the edges nice and raggedy, and also turning it inside out to make sure all of the inside of the sleeve was also thoroughly coated, before sliding it on over the base and playing with it to create lots of interesting creases in the fabric.

The sleeve took a bit of persuasion to stay in place, so I wrapped some clingfilm round it and left it overnight so that it would harden in the position I wanted it to be in.

Once the sleeve had set in place, I added some plastic spiders to really spook it up.  The spiders I used were plastic ones so I secured them in place with superglue.

I also wanted to add a bit more weight to my sculpture so I painted a couple of small tiles with Black Powertex and placed my Powertex Wooden Base on top of these.

Now it was time to add the final touch of colour.

I chose to use Red and Burgendy to give the effect of dried blood and fresh blood, along with the Golden Olive for the zombified hand.

The shirt I dry brushed with White and did the Spiders in Silver before going over the whole thing with the Wonderfully Spooky Terragreen to finish it off.

This was definitely out of my comfort zone, but great fun to make.  The Powertex Team would love to see your Halloween makes so please do post them on our Facebook Page Powertex Addicts United

You can see more of my makes on www.facebook.com/artmuralsbydonnamcghie 

or my website www.artandmurals.co.ukwww.artandmurals.co.uk

 

Harvest Goddess

 

Well, yet another month has passed and boy has this one gone by so quickly before we know it Christmas will be here!! YES, I said it, the C word… oops

So this month the Powertex Design team were given keywords for creative ideas and I chose Harvest. I started thinking about Harvest, did some research and found a lovely goddess called “Demeter”
She is  the goddess of the grain, agriculture, harvest, growth, and nourishment, who presided over grains and the fertility of the earth, I have set about recreating her in my own way.

I had some barbie type dolls and decided it was time to use one of those as my Goddess. I made a base from wood and used an old knife to make her sturdy and wrapped tape to add her to the knife and wood base. I have used BRONZE POWERTEX as my base colour. I then picked out some STOCKINETTE material for her dress and set about making some flowers and leaves from clay to add as embellishments 
I soaked the material in the Powertex and started dressing my Goddess.  I pinned up her hair and have cut it, as I plan to add embellishments to her head later.

 

 

And with the magic of COLORTRICX and a bit of a paint job, she is now looking like this.

 

 

 

 

Meet Demeter, my version of the Goddess of Harvest
I hope you have enjoyed this blog and maybe even get inspired to try out Powertex yourself.,
If you fancy ago but need some guidance why not try looking here for a tutor near you
Until next time, be happy and give that Powertex bottle a shake!!!
~Jinny~
DAYLIGHT PHOTOS