Planet in the Night Sky

A fantasy planet

Designer – Jill Cullum

Planet in the night sky in Powertex by Jill Cullum
Powertex Planet in the Night Sky by Jill Cullum

For my planet in the night sky, inspiration came from warm summer nights, sat in the garden, looking out for shooting stars. I decided to try and replicate one of the planets. Hmmm, once started though, my imagination overtook and the finished article became much more magical.

Easy 3d flex makes beautiful cracks and texture. Experiment using different mediums to add colours. Here I have used layers of inks and acrylics, with a final layer of wax.

As you will see from the photographs, things changed along the way. This is what I love about mixed media. Some layers get covered, some peak through. It’s all part of the journey of creating what you love. Just go with it!

The Secret Art Loft acrylics and inks work wonderfully for layering up. Their translucent quality makes blending easy, and the metallic inks look like molten metal.

Top tip

I find it is really important with mixed media, to let each layer dry thoroughly before moving onto the next. Not an easy one for me, as I am an impatient crafter. However, your layers will become muddy if they aren’t dry.

Materials list

Creating a base

Creating a base for the planet with Powertex
Step 1 – creating a base

Pour Powertex liquid colour onto the canvas. Spray with Bister of a different colour then dry with a hairdryer, to create the crackle effect.

Add texture by creating a heavy crackle effect

Adding more texture to your planet base with Easy 3d Flex
Step 2 – adding texture

Mix Easy 3d flex with Ivory Powertex to create a clay. Layer over half of the canvas. Dry with hair-dryer spraying lightly with blue bister during the process.

Creating further texture

Use Powertex and fabric and clay to add texture layers to your planet
Step 3 – creating further texture

Using material, coated in Ivory Powertex and small ‘craters’ made from the 3d flex clay, build the layers of your planet.

Adding colour

Add green colours to the cracked areas of the planet
Step 4 – adding colour

Start by adding green ink to the deep cracked area and violet acrylic to the green side of the planet.

Building layers

add clay craters and shapes to the surface
Step 5 – building layers

Using greens, pinks and purples, layer the craters, blending as you go. Paint the material section with black acrylic, then add layers of metallic acrylic.

Powerwax

Use Powerwax mixed with powder pigment to layer on colour to your planet textures
Step 6 – Powerwax

On the side created by 3d flex, add a layer of Powerwax, mixed with pigment. Once dry, wipe with a damp sponge to add interest.

Finishing Touches

I decided my fantasy planet needed a touch more ‘bling’ so I added a few beads, blending in with the colours I had chosen along the way. The joys of creating a fantasy planet are that you can really be free with your choice of colours and the texture that you create. It’s nice not to be too rigid in your planning, as planets evolve, then so should a piece of art.

Planet in the night sky

Powertex planet in the night sky by Jill Cullum
Powertex planet in the night sky

I am looking forward to seeing lots of new planets, so feel free to share them in the Powertex Studio.

If you would like further planet inspiration take a look at this blog from Annette Smyth. Or why not join me for a workshop to create your own planet. Bye for now, Jill x

Ugly Ocean Fish Sculpture

Powertex Fish Sculpture by Jinny Holt

Designer: Jinny Holt

For this months article my theme was Fish Sculpture. So this got me thinking about the ocean and all the plastic that is killing off all the fish and other sea life in our waters.

Plastics and Powertex

Right now it’s estimated that over 12 million tonnes of plastic – everything from plastic bottles and bags to microbeads – end up in our oceans each year. That’s a lorry load of rubbish a minute.

Traveling on ocean currents this plastic is now turning up in every corner of our planet – from Cornish beaches to uninhabited Pacific islands. It is even being found trapped in Arctic ice.

So I executed my article on these facts above and this is a reason why I love using Powertex as my art medium of choice. We can slowly, one piece of plastic at a time reduce our plastic waste by turning it into art.

Supplies

Items needed

Ivory Powertex Universal Medium

Stone Art

Powercolor Pigments in Brown and Green

Polystyrene egg

Kitchen paper, plastic bottle, cardboard strips, textures from stash

Craft wire

Small canvas base

Step 1

For this article, I started by placing some cut wire lengths into the medium-sized polystyrene egg to create a basic fish shape. Some kitchen roll (which is tucked behind the other fibers) and painted it with the IVORY POWERTEX.

Basic fish shape

Step 2

It needed a nose, so I made up some clay by mixing STONE ART and the Ivory Powertex together. I then proceeded to cover the rest of the fish shape in kitchen roll and Powertex.

I added lace for the fins and dried these with a hair dryer to add movement to them.

Powertex fish by Jinny Holt
Added lace for the fins

Step 3

I then set about painting my fish with the PIGMENT POWDERS and Powertex varnish and I put this aside to dry.

I next got the canvas as this is going to be my base for the sculpture. Create the texture by painting on the Ivory Powertex and sprinkling on some sand, kitchen roll and textures from my stash. I set this aside to dry.

Powertex textured canvas
canvas as base

Step 4

I took the plastic bottle and cut a slit up one side of it, so I could add in my painted fish.

Powertex fish sculpture
Slit in plastic bottle

Now the best bit

I then painted the canvas in yellow and green Powertex pigment. I cut the bottle at an angle at the bottom and then adhered it to the canvas. To help hold up the bottle I used some dried moss and shells I had in my stash.

I dry brushed on the complete sculpture with brown pigment and added colour to some of the moss to depict coral. The seaweed is cardboard strips soaked in Ivory Powertex and painted with green pigment. Add them behind the bottle to create the scene.

Ugly ocean fish sculpture
Ugly Ocean Fish Sculpture

Food for thought

So I aim to use as much recycled plastic as I can in my artwork at least I know I am doing my bit to help save our planet.

If I am the rest of the Powertex Design team have left you inspired, we would love to see some of your creations at THE POWERTEX STUDIO over on Facebook. You can also get loads of Powertex inspiration over on Pinterest and Instagram.

Find me sharing my latest makes over on MUMS SHED.

Thank you for reading my article for this month. Did you catch my dragon eggs article from last month?

Live~Love~Laugh~Create

Jinny

Clowning around with Powertex Clownfish

Powertex Clownfish sculptures by Annette Smyth

By Annette Smyth

Powertex Clownfish sculptures by Annette Smyth
Clown Fish

Hello everyone and welcome to my latest article.  I was so excited when I found out the theme for this month was UNDER THE SEA.  I love anything connected with the ocean.  So much so that I think I could have been a mermaid in another lifetime. In fact my dream home is next to the sea with an airy, light cliff top studio looking over the waves and beach – I did say it was dream!

My inspiration for my creation came from old photographs I had taken during a diving holiday.  Whilst flipping through the album these cute little clownfish kept appearing time and time again. Obviously they were crying out to be made into a sculpture.

I like to use StoneArt clay for my Powertex clownfish sculptures.  Making my clay up and giving it time to rest before using it, I find gives me the best results.  Resting it overnight double wrapped in clingfilm in my usual method.

DID YOU KNOW –  Stone Art clay will keep for at least two weeks if kept in an airtight wrapping.  

Materials List
Kitchen foil
Masking tape
Ivory Powertex Universal Medium
Powertex Stone Art
Powercolor pigments – White, Orange, black
Powertex Easy Varnish
2 black glass eyes on metal wire

You will also need 
Plastic gloves
Paintbrush
Plastic container to pour Powertex into and mix Stone Art clay in

Create Clownfish Armature

  1. Using the foil, form a teardrop shape with slightly pointed ends and flat bottom approximately 10cm long and 2cm thick – don’t worry about fins, they come at the clay stage

2.  Cover the shape with masking tape

3. Paint with a layer of Ivory Powertex Universal Medium

Adding Stone Art clay

Powertex Clownfish Stone Art clay

4. Make Stone Art clay using Ivory Powertex – see the “how to” video from my previous article here.

5. Cover your fish with clay.  Blend the joins together with a slightly damp finger.  Pinch the clay away from the body to create the fins and tail.  

6. Place the eyes in position and push through the clay into the underlying tape and foil.  Leave aside to dry.

TOP TIP – Use a pointy tool or cocktail stick to make the hole for the eyes as this will go through the tape more easily.

Adding colour

7. Using the easy varnish and orange pigment dry brush the stripes onto the fish. See “how to” video here.

8.  Now repeat with the white pigment filling in the gaps between the orange stripes.

9. Finally using the black pigment paint thin lines where the orange and white stripes meet and dry brush black around the fins and tail.

I decide to create a soft coral for my fish to sit in using an old cotton mop head and Ivory Powertex.  

Powertex Clownfish by Annette Smyth
Clown fish in coral

Just think of all the other fish and sea creatures you could create. Have you seen the amazing Powertex Ammonite Light article by Jill Cullum. Your sea babies would look fantastic nestled into this.

I would love to see what you come up with.  Why not leave your comments on this article below and share your makes in the Powertex Studio group on Facebook.  

Until next time Happy Creative Adventures and remember you can always find me on my Facebook page and on my website.

Axx

Powertex DIY Lamp

Powertex DIY Lamp by Kore Sage

Designer: Kore Sage

Make a Powertex DIY lamp for lovely gifts or home decor and with Powertex you can make your own. Powertex fabric sculpture and fairy lights are an easy way to craft a lamp. I’m using battery powered LED fairy lights. Be sure to use LED lights for you project as these keep cool. Do not use a flame candle in this lamp.

I’m Kore and I want to show you how I made my own Powertex lamp using a bottle for a “mould”, simple Powertex techniques and a pack of battery LED fairy lights. Choose your own favourite embellishments to create the lamp in your own style. I’m using white fairy lights but coloured lights would be lovely too.

Powertex Lamp with LED fairy lights
Powertex DIY Lamp

Materials list

Powertex Universal Medium in Ivory

Ready Made Bister Spray in Blue

Colortricx pigment in Rich Gold

Easy Varnish

A large bottle or container for a mould

A plastic bag

Masking tape

Cotton fabric strips about 2″ – 3″ wide and a square for the bottom

MDF Dropouts

MDF Alphabet

3d Balls

Battery powered LED fairy lights

Prepare a mould

Wrap your bottle with plastic and secure with small pieces of tape. Don’t wrap too tight and ensure there are no holes.

Wrap the bottle in plastic
Step one

Wrap the bottle

Using fabric with Powertex, cover the bottom of the bottle first and apply strips in spirals upwards. Leave gaps in the wrapping for the light.

Use Powertex with fabric to wrap the bottle
Step two
Leave to dry for a few hours before removing the bottle

Decorate with embellishments

I used Powertex Ivory to add some 3d balls, mdf drop outs and letters. The structure is sturdy but avoid heavy embellishments at the top.

Add embellishments
Step three

Colour with Bister spray

Spray generously with Ready Made Bister Spray. Don’t forget the underneath, I left the inside Ivory.

Spray generously with Blue Bister
Step four

Create highlights

I used a damp cloth to wipe back some of the Bister from the raised textures.

Wipe away Bister form textures with a damp cloth
Step five

Add some shine

Metallics add a little extra shine on a lamp. I mixed Rich Gold powder pigment with Easy Varnish and dry brushed some textures.

Dry brush with Rick Gold pigment
Step six
Powertex DIY Lamp Insert LED lights for a lovely glow
Insert the LED lights for a lovely glow

I hope you have a go at making a lamp. Do share your creations with us in the Facebook group at Powertex Addicts United. If you’ve enjoyed this idea you might also want to take a look at Donna’s bottle light project too.

You can find more of my art and Powertex at Kore Sage Art but until next time, I hope you find some time to let your art out.

Recycled Bottle Powertex art

Recycled Bottle Art Mixed Media with Powertex – by Anne

I simply love to recycle, upcycle and repurpose so this project using a recycled wine bottle and a set of cheap cocktail glasses from the charity shop was a perfect project for me. I also used some of my old T shirts and fabric scraps too, to create  recycled bottle powertex art.

recycled bottle powertex art

This set is now perfect for any festive or celebratory occasion. The bottle could be used either as a decanter (by using with a bottle stopper or cork) or used with a slim candle to adorn the table. Using Powertex enables items to be easily washed too.

Materials used:

How it was done:

The bottle was actually a project that I started on my level 1 Powertex Tutor training. I was fairly happy with it but I had always wanted to take it a few steps further. I am definitely a ‘more is more’ type of girl and I wanted to add extra embellishments to complete it – but what? Sadly it got confined to the corner for over a year before the idea finally came to me when I came home from the charity shop with my set of cocktail glasses.

AW Glasses 1

The lemon coloured glasses inspired citrus, the blue coloured glasses inspired berries – yay – off we go!

 recycled bottle powertex art

Starting with my bottle: Blue Powertex medium was used to coat recycled T shirt fabrics and hessian which was draped around the bottle to give texture. Kitchen paper was separated into single ply and blue Powertex was used to glue it around the neck of the bottle to give added texture. Blue Powertex was also used to paint and glue the plaster face.

Eeeek – I was freaking out a bit this stage as it looked awful. I will say that this was part of the training. We were given a few challenges! The blue is a gorgeous colour but not necessarily the easiest for your first ventures. If you are a beginner I would recommend starting with Bronze Powertex and colouring as I did for the blue glasses as given below; achieving a similar final result with less palpitations – tee hee.

 recycled bottle powertex art

Spritzing with Brown and Red Bister gave a nice purple muted effect which was lovely, and also blended in the darker T shirt material nicely. Powercolor and Colortricx Pigments were mixed with Easy Varnish and dry brushed over the piece to highlight textures. The dry brushing really does make so much difference! Ooooh much happier now, but as I said – it needed more work in my mind.

AW Fruit 1

Now for the embellishments: With fruit embellishments in mind I mixed up some Stone Art with Ivory Powertex to make a clay and used silicone moulds to make citrus slices, nuts, leaves and berries. Once dry I used Secret Art Loft Acrylics to paint them.

AW Fruit 2

When painting the fruit slices the outer ring of pith was left unpainted. Dry brushing with Ivory Powertex was used to highlight the central pith texture and make the lemon slices look more realistic.

AW Fruit 3

The same with the orange slices.

AW Fruit 4

The berries and nuts were also painted with Secret Art Loft Acrylics. I mixed colours to give a more naturalistic look.

AW Fruit 5

Varying colour mixes and depth.

AW Fruit 6

Purples, pinks, oranges and green mixes were used to colour the berries. Once coated with varnish (last steps) they looked quite realistic.

recycled bottle powertex art

Various fruits, nuts and leaves were used to embellish the bottle.  Items were stuck down using Transparent Powertex. Where needed 3D sand was mixed with Bronze Powertex in order to make a 3D glue to stick down shaped embellishments on the textural surface.

Yay – fulfilling my ‘more is more’ – ha ha.

 recycled bottle powertex art

Secret Art Loft pigments were mixed with varnish and were dry brushed over textured areas and over the berries to give extra pearlescent sheen.

Coloured Powertex is weatherproof and therefore washable. Acrylic paint layers were further protected by painting with Easy varnish to ensure that the bottle was fully washable. The varnish also enhanced the painting and gave the fruits and berries a lovely sheen. Happy bunny.

AW Glasses 2

Next to decorate the glasses:  I collected together varied textural fabrics. The blue background is my plastic shower curtain that I use to cover my bench – joyous messiness evident!

AW Glasses 3

The glass stems and base of the bowls were painted with a coat of bronze Powertex. Any drips were removed with a damp cloth. T shirt fabric was cut into strips and stretched to make a ‘cord’ for wrapping the stems. More fabrics and T shirt strips were coated with Bronze Powertex and wrapped around the glass bowls. The T shirt cord held everything in place around the top of the glasses while drying. I applied the main 3D texture just to one face, leaving the backs flatter (otherwise they might get in the way when drinking from the glasses). The smoother stems made them easy and comfortable to hold.

AW Glasses 4

The blue glasses were embellished with berries and textures enhanced with dry brushing using the blue/purple toned Secret Art Loft Pigments.

AW Glasses 5

Oooh yummy.

AW Glasses 6

The yellow glasses were embellished with citrus slices and textures enhanced with dry brushing using the citrus and gold toned Secret Art Loft Pigments.

AW Glasses 7

More yummy.

recycled bottle powertex art

I hope that you like my celebratory table set. I really enjoy making these – and using now them – special glasses seem to make the contents more special too.

recycled bottle powertex art

Do join us over in the Powertex Studio over on Facebook and share with us your recycled bottle powertex art. Happy crafting, Anne x.

Pastel Powertex Bottle Vases

Powertex bottle vases in pastels

Designer: Kore Sage

How to create Pastel Powertex

Pastel colours can be mixed with Powertex universal medium to create soft effects for your projects. Pastel Powertex is perfect for Spring projects, florals and even Mother’s Day gifts. I’m Kore and I want to show you how I mix pastel colours and highlight the textures. I’ll be transforming small glass drink bottles into floral Spring vases.

Powertex bottle vases in pastels
Powertex pastel bottle vases

Powertex Universal Medium colours are all mixable and with the exception of Transparent, will be weatherproof when cured. Pastel colours can be mixed using Ivory or White although I used Ivory for my project.

I recommend you experiment with tiny amounts of your colours to find your favourite combinations. I’m using my favourite pale blue. I add small amounts of blue Powertex to Ivory (or White) until I have a shade I like.

It is possible to mix more than two colours together. For example Blue and Yellow Ochre to make green then mix with Ivory for a lighter shade.

Materials list

Prepare the fabric

Cut strips of light fabric approximately 1-2 inches wide, pieces of string 2 – 4 inches long and choose embellishments.

Preparing strips of fabric for Powertex bottle
Step one

Mix pastel Powertex

Pour your Ivory Powertex onto a plate or dish and add a tiny amount of Blue Powertex. Add a little until you have a pastel shade.

Mixing Powertex pastel colours with Blue and Ivory
Step two

Wrap the bottle

Coat fabric strips with the Powertex mix and wrap around the bottle until it’s covered. Wrap loosely in spirals.

Bottle wrapped with fabric in blue Powertex
Step three

Add embellishments

Add string and floral embellishments. I created spiral shapes with string and coated embellishments with Powertex and adhered them to the bottle.

Blue Powertex bottle adding string and wooden embellishments
Step four

Mix dry paint

Mix a dry paint with white Powercolor and Easy Varnish

Mixing white paint with Easy Varnish and White Powercolor powder
Step five

Highlight textures

Use a dry brushing technique to highlight the textures of the fabric and the enbellishments. Keep your brush flat and in the same direction.

Using a dry brushing technique to highlight textures
Step six

Pastel Powertex bottle

These Spring vases use simple techniques to create textured vases that can be made in your favourite colours. They look lovely in groups with your favourite single stem flowers. 

Finished pastel blue bottle

Please do leave me a comment if you would like to try Powertex in pastels. Or hop over to this article where Abigail is mixing purple for her mixed media project. Like our Facebook page where you can join the private group and share your own makes.

I hope you make some time to let your art out. Find more of my work at Kore Sage Art, until next time, Kore x

Powertex Triptych

Powertex tryptic

Designer~Jinny Holt

Powertex Triptych

What is a Triptych?

Hello all, where does the time go? It is once again that time of the month to show you my latest article and this month the theme was a Powertex Triptych.  I looked up the word on the internet and it states that Triptych is a work of art (usually a panel painting) that is divided into three sections or three carved panels that are hinged together or can be folded shut or displayed openly.

Where to start your Powertex Triptych

For my article, I decided to use three square canvases as I did not have any spare panels and I wanted to try an ombre effect on my completed piece. I wanted texture and depth to my final piece and I had in mind already what colours I wanted to use. So without further ado, here is how I created my finished canvas.

For this Powertex Triptych you will need

  • Three canvases or panels
  • Easy 3D Flex
  • Ivory Powertex
  • Pieces of material and lace
  • MDF pieces and or embellishments

I painted all three canvases with IVORY POWERTEX. Laying materials and lace in place. Keeping in mind that my canvas is one body of work.


I left these to dry overnight.

I made a paste with EASY 3D FLEX, Ivory Powertex and bit of water. And applied with a palette knife to add interest and texture.


These are the colours I used for the three canvases that were now dried.

I started with the darkest colour first, being the lovely DARK BLUE PIGMENT

Powertex Triptych

Then went up the canvases getting lighter with the colours, until I reached the top canvas which was a mix of the Green and the WHITE PIGMENT.

Powertex Triptych
I added a touch of true gold colortricx and varnish to pick out the texture. I do love bling, so added some matching gems with transparent Powertex.

Feeling Inspired?

Hopefully this article has left you inspired. We would love to see any of your finished Powertex pieces over at THE POWERTEX STUDIO

If you would like to see more of my Powertex creations you can find me at MUMS SHED

It would be lovely to hear from you, if you would like to leave a comment.

Thank you for reading my article for this month. Did you catch my article from last month. Click here to be inspired and see why I love Powertex!

Live~Love~Laugh~Create

Jinny

Pastel Powertex Flowers

Pastel Powertex flowers

Powertex Flowers – Pastel Shades

Designer – Jill Cullum

Spring is on the way!

I love Spring – the promise of lighter nights and the garden coming to life with colour. I also love a pretty vase of flowers on my dining table. With this in mind I decided to use Powertex in a different way for my latest article. By creating some pastel Powertex flowers.

Did you know that by mixing Ivory Powertex with other colours, you can create some very pretty pastel shades?  This article shows you how to create a vase of pastel flowers, bringing a touch of Spring into your home, all year round.

Materials list:

Pastel Powertex flowers

Raid your stash

From my stash I found a variety of embellishments, wooden beads, bottle tops and small egg shaped beads to use for the centres. I added small 3D Balls to give the centre of the flowers some interest. Adding delicate lace for the main petals and garden cane for the stalks. I also used some pipe cleaners for the stalks which worked well. Not weatherproof but hardened enough to hold up the flower head, giving great texture.


Designer Tip – Pour your Ivory Powertex out first, then add very small amounts of coloured Powertex. You only need a little colour to create a pastel shade. You can always add more if needed.

Bring your pastel Powertex flowers to life

Working on smaller pieces is sometimes more fiddly. With this in mind it is a good idea to have the hairdryer at hand.   A piece of polystyrene is also useful, so that you can stand your stems in to dry rather than laying them down – helping to keep the shape.

I have mixed Ivory with blue, red and yellow fabric hardener to create the pastel shades. For the stems I mixed Ivory with Green Powertex, one of my favourite colours I mixed for this article. 

To finish the flowers I brought out the texture with dry-brushing in a lighter shade of the same pastel flower colour, adding a further layer of white pigment.

Pastel Powertex flowers

I hope this has inspired you to grow your own Powertex flowers. Please share them with us in The Powertex Studio.

Please be inspired by more of my work in my last article. Find it here. If you like what you see press the star or leave a message in the comment box below.

Well for now I am going to wait for Spring and plan my next article. In the meantime you can find me at Purple Meadow Arts & Crafts. Bye for now. Jill x

Secret Art Box Love

True Love in a Secret Art Box- Shell North

February is the month of love so what better theme than ‘True Love’ could you have for this months Secret art box? So I decided to mix it up, take on a challenge and embrace my fears. So I am about to share with you some Secret Art Box Love.

In this article I show my first EVER video demo. But I have to admit I took on a more monumental task than anticipated. This is because it took far longer than expected (doesn’t it always when you learn something new). I was stalled by illness and it’s safe to say I came across more than a few technical challenges. This included loosing files so please bear with me!

When I say monumental task, there are 5 demo videos plus the box opening for you too get your teeth into. But you don’t have to watch all the videos at once. Perhaps come back again and view each video another time. Because this is a article on an online magazine you can view at anytime to suit you.

To start off I’ve decided to share opening my box. This is to show everyone a version of what theses delicious box full of goodies can contain.

The video didn’t turn the right way, so I’m off to a great start :D….However I have several video demos. And if you to bear with my first ever videos I’m sure you’ll still pick up lots of tips or cringe with me 🙂

True Love is free

My first Ever demo is called ‘True love is free’. It was my first inspiration upon opening all of the art box contents. I incorporated it with something I found in a charity shop. Unfortunately my memory card became faulty half way through filming. Because of this the parts where I made the leaves , roses, and where I rustied up the cage, cupid and the key are missing.

Heres a collage of the finished piece

Shell North, The Crafty Little Corner, True Love is Free, Secret Art box love.
True Love is Free

Love Notes

My second make with February’s Secret art box goodies was a journal. I named this piece “love notes’. So if journals are your thing this video demo could be right up your street.

Please excuse the fact that the begining of the video was lost due to a corrupt memory card so this is halfway through.

I used a variation of textured wall paper and stenciled images on the MDF hearts using Easy Structure. Next all items were coated and attached using Ivory Powertex fabric hardener. After drying with a hair dryer I then painted the whole journal in Secret art loft Raspberry acrylic Ink.

Here is the finished journal.

Shell North, The Crafty Little Corner, Love Notes, Secret Art Box Love
Love Notes.

Love Actually

Next on my agenda was the Pendant. I called this the ‘Love actually pendant’. Because after editing the video it became apparent that I use the word actually an awful lot (cringe!!!)

…and here is the finished piece

Shell North, The Crafty Little Corner, Love Actually, Secret Art Box Love
Love Actually.

Bee Mine

So I’ve been a busy bee as you can see, oh dear, I now have bees on my mind. My next creation was inspired by the other half heart and the sunflower mould that came in the box.

Once the heart was covered in sunflowers I wanted to incorporate bees for some reason?! I named this one unsuprisingly ‘Bee mine’. This took me further out of my comfort zone, can you guess why? But it may be your thing? Watch and find out!

Here’s my Bee-utiful finished ‘Bee mine’ canvas

Shell North, The Crafty Little Corner, Bee Mine,
Bee Mine

Reflections of love

To finish off the month of love, I came to be inspired for this creation by my partner. We were discussing how busy\stressed I’ve been when I should of been resting. How maybe I need to ‘reflect’ on my needs by not taking on too much. Or taking what could have been a small task and making it a monumental one….now distracted from the said conversation by one word…..Reflect…….yes….my mind pinged with my last creation. Watch now to find out.

Here’s the finished treasure.

Shell North, The Crafty Little Corner, reflections of love, secret art box love
Reflections of Love

Well thats it from me, what a journey this article has been. Despite my reservations I’m glad I faced my fear of videoing and working out of my comfort zone. I hope I’ve inspired you to create something unique. To do something out of your comfort zone with crafting or perhaps inspired you further to order next month’s Secret art box.

If you have any questions from products to techniques. Or you would like to make something similar to the projects in this article. Please don’t hesitate to send me a message at The Crafty Little Corner.

That all from me, List of items with links used right at the end.

Don’t forget to leave a comment.

Peace, love and video blog shenanigans

Shell 🙂

Red Powertex fabric hardenerlead grey Powertex fabric hardenertransparent Powertex fabric hardenerIvory Powertex fabric hardeneryellow ochre Powertex fabric hardenerpolystyrene heartembellishmentsMDF keyAngel cast embellishmentrose mouldsrust powderred ochre powercolor pigmentEasy coat varnishstone art3D flex, MDF hearts, MDF heart flowersMDF journalMDF name plate, Raspberry acrylic ink, white powercolor powder pigmentlipstick fizz SAL powder pigmentTerra-violet colourtrix powder pigmentparty pearls pigment pigment trayviolet valentine SAL pigmentSilver colortrix powder pigmentsunflower moulddaisy mouldspansy mouldsegg yolk acrylic inkpalm leaf acrylic inkvictorian papersEasy coat mattpink flamingo SAL powder pigmentterra-green colortrix powder pigmentbronze gold colortrix powder pigment,  heart rice paper.Edit”True love in a Secret Art Box-Shell North”

Powertex Art Doll Time

Powertex art doll Kore Sage

Powertex Art Doll time on the blog again. These kits are a wonderful project to do if you’re looking to spread your creative wings. The template gives you a starting point with lots of room to try new techniques and ideas. I used a few techniques on my art doll to represent “time flies” but you could just choose the parts you like. That’s the beauty of these kits. Having no rules can be scary like a blank canvas but just try a technique or two that you like and make it yours. Here she is, my Powertex art doll using the small template.

Powertex Art Doll project by Kore Sage
Powertex Art Doll by Kore Sage

Supplies

Powertex small art doll mdf kit
Powertex Small art doll kit

These were the supplies used on this art doll.

Small art doll mdf kit

Powertex Universal Medium in Transparent, Ivory and Black

Rice Paper

Easy Coat Mat

Rusty Powder

Easy Structure

3d Sand and Small balls

Acrylic paints in Red Velvet and Orange Marmalade

Mdf drop outs

Powercotton

Assorted keys from Treasure boxes

Paper fasteners

Getting started

First pop out your Mdf shapes and try some layouts that you like. When you’re settled on a placement, start to prepare your pieces. I tore up a piece of rice paper to roughly fit the body. The theme is “time flies” so I chose a paper with pocket watches on. This fits the rectangular base of the “box”.

Gathering some of my favourite embellishments makes the art doll unique. I added a circle of hessian fabric that was hardened with Black Powertex, to support the plaster face because I wanted to tilt her head. Small wooden shapes add interest and the Mdf drop outs were perfect for this. At this stage I decided I wanted to give her two halves.

Powertex Art Doll arranging pieces by Kore Sage
Laying out the pieces

Powertex art doll time, assemble the pieces

To start, get your pieces together with your chosen Powertex and a flat paintbrush. Apply the pocket watch rice paper to the mdf using Easy Coat Matt. Brush it onto the mdf first and lay the paper on top and gently coat with a brush, from the centre outwards. Easy Coat allows any accidental Powertex to be wiped away from the paper. Transparent Powertex will also work but will be less wipeable.

With Black Powertex, start to assemble your doll by painting and sticking the pieces together. Be careful to turn the base panel so the holes are at the bottom. Layer the “frame” underneath the “box” and do not add the bottom panel. Put the “hooks” into place here with the hooks facing forwards. I waited until the textures had been added but you can do it at this stage. Focus on painting the front first and paint the back when it’s dry. At this stage you can start to see how you can decorate your art doll.

Assembling the art doll by Kore Sage
Assembling the Art Doll

While the doll is drying, it’s a great time to prepare any embellishments with acrylic paint, Black and Ivory powertex. Decorate your pieces how you like but at this stage I’m starting to identify which pieces I want to be coloured and which pieces I’m keeping Black or Ivory. Don’t forget the “leg” pieces too, I prepared these with acrylic paints.

Adding texture

When your doll is touch dry use Easy Structure on a plastic palette knife to add thick texture on the wings and around the sides of the body. Use the paste to hide the hard edges where the “frame” part is used to lift up the box. Create indentations and marks on the wings and sides.

At this point I’m also starting to define the two halves of the doll using Ivory Powertex on the box sides and on the rays around her head. Leave this to dry for several hours as the Easy Structure is quite thick in places.

Powertex Art Doll choosing pieces embellishments Kore Sage
Preparing mdf pieces

Rusty Powder

Rusty Powder adds real rust texture and colour. I wanted a dark rust that would show off layers of the transparent acrylic paints on one side but appear very dark on the other side. The mixture I made is Rusty Powder 50/50 with Transparent Powertex and a little white vinegar. Use 3d sand to thicken the mixture and 3d small balls to add texture. Prepare a spray bottle with white vinegar and water and make sure it has plenty of vinegar for a dark rust, about 40%.

Plastic palette knives are perfect for applying the rusty mixture over the wings, head base (not the plaster) and the sides. Paste a little on the “leg” pieces too for texture and colour. Spray these areas generously with the vinegar and water spray and leave it to rust for a few hours before repeating the process. Doing the same again with a slightly weaker rust mixture will give you different shades of rust although this is optional.

Art Doll with Rusty Powder by Kore Sage
Art Doll Texture with Rusty Powder

Acrylic paints

The Secret Art Loft acrylic paints from Powertex UK are easy to blend and their transparency makes them perfect for this project. I layered Red Velvet and Orange Marmalade paints onto the rusty areas but only on the left side of the doll. This defined the halves and brightened one side. I also painted the left side of the plaster face with Red Velvet paint and left it to dry. You can repeat these steps as often as you need to get the colour you like.

Art Doll Acrylic paint by Kore Sage
Adding Colour with Acrylic paint

The body of the art doll

The body of the doll is the “box” part and this is a great place to get creative, it’s like a mini canvas. Your chosen rice paper might determine the style of embellishments you use. The rice paper is already in place but I wanted to add some details to the body. I had already prepared my embellishments for this but didn’t use everything that I’d chosen. Coat a small wooden heart with Red Velvet paint and use transparent Powertex to adhere some Small balls. Paint it again with red paint when dry. Glue the heart and silver key in place with Transparent Powertex.

Paint some tiny circles from the drop outs pack in Black and Ivory Powertex to match the dark and light sides of the doll. The threads you can see criss-crossing over the doll are threads pulled from some hessian fabric. Cut strands roughly to size, cover them in black Powertex and leave to dry on a plastic mat while checking they are straight.

When dry, use Transparent Powertex to stick these into a criss-cross pattern over the box. After this, use the drop out circles to cover the ends of the threads and create a pattern around the edge. Coat the body and the hooks on the right side of the doll with Ivory. Your doll is coming together nicely but there’s something crucial missing!

Powertex art doll body by Kore Sage
Decorating the Body

The doll’s head

Transparent Powertex is perfect as a glue to keep the plaster face in place, slightly tilted to one side. Cut six chunks of Powercotton into thick pieces about 3 inches long to create the hair. Lay them on a non stick mat and use a paintbrush to carefully push Ivory Powertex into the fibres however try to keep the strands fairly straight and not too tangled! Brush down in the same direction until the Powertex is massaged into the fibres. When it’s well coated, curl the pieces around the head and down the side of the doll keeping lots of texture. You could apply hair to both sides of course but I chose to keep the “halves” of the doll.

When I applied the curls they were starting to fall quite flat so I used some Large 3d balls underneath and in her hair to keep it propped up! I just glued them in place with Transparent Powertex. In addition, this added extra texture and where the balls could be seen they looked like bubbles in her hair!

To add a bit of colour and texture to this side, I brushed her face, hair and small cardboard stars with Ivory Powertex, pushed the stars into her hair and sprinkled a little Rusty Powder over the wet Powertex. I spritzed a quick spray of the vinegar and water mixture to get the rusting started and because the spray is strong I didn’t need to repeat it.

Art Doll Face and Hair by Kore Sage
The Face and Hair

Finishing touches

There’s just a few finishing touches before our doll is ready to display. I’ve already painted the “legs” and given them a rust treatment so now I just paint one leg with Ivory to match the light side. Fit paperfasteners through the holes as “knees” and “hips” for the doll so the legs could hang underneath. Dab black Powertex on the paper fasteners to cover their metallic colour.

The tiny padlock was given the rust treatment earlier and was attached with a little jump ring. I chose tiny keys from the Treasure box which were hung on jump rings and then off the hooks at the bottom. Brush a quick flick of Ivory Powertex to add a highlight to the red side of her face and she’s done!

Art Doll finishing touches by Kore Sage
Art Doll finishing touches

I can really recommend the art dolls if you like a project you can get creative with. The clock is next on my list! The design team members have created their own unique art dolls and you can see them here.

Time flies Powertex art doll

Powertex art doll Kore Sage
Powertex Art Doll by Kore Sage

I hope you enjoyed the art dolls project as much as I have. Join us over on Facebook if you have a Powertex project to share, just pop by Powertex Addicts United and join The Powertex Studio group. We love to see your makes and it’s a great place to get some inspiration or ask questions. You can find out more about me and my art on Facebook at Kore Sage Art.