If Medusa could Stone Art you

Designer – Shell North

For my July article we are delving into ancient Rome and looking at incorporating Medusa and Stone Art. The Romans were renowned for their love of wine, both producing it and drinking it. So a wine Medusa jug is what I will teach you to make this time.

Medusa was a Gorgon and one of the most frequently repeated motifs in Greek and later, in Roman antiquities. The Legend has it that if you were to gaze into her eyes you would turn to stone. Or in our case…Stone art!

Powertex Stone Art Medusa jug by Shell North

Materials List

Powertex materials list for Medusa jug
Powertex item list

How to make a Stone Art Medusa jug

Make some Stone Art clay

To start I mixed my own colour using the Bronze, Lead and Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener to make my own shade of stone art clay. I mixed it with equal parts Stone Art powder to make the clay.

Mixing Powertex

TOP TIP Leave some of the Powertex mix aside before mixing in the Stone Art powder as you will need some for the cotton later.

Making the jug shape

Insert the bottle into the large yoghurt pot, add foil to create shape and cover in masking tape. Shape foil to create a handle and tape as above.

Make the jug shape with foil

The messy fun bit

Using the Stone Art clay, smooth pieces over the base little by little until covered. Shape a spout as desired with the Stone Art clay.

Add Stone Art clay

Adding the motif

Cover the back of your plaster face with a little Stone Art clay and smooth around the edges into position.

Plaster face
Use a plaster face

Creating the deadly snake hair

To create Medusa’s hair use some tiny strips of cotton and work them into the Powertex Fabric Hardener colour mix you made earlier.

Making fabric snake hair
Making snake hair

Creating moving hair

Using the wet strands, apply one by one in a wiggly position, over lapping and layering to create movement like living snakes!

Snake hair Medusa
Medusa

To finish

Dry brush lighter shades of Grey and Red ochre Powercolor pigments and Easy Varnish, finishing with lighter colours last to give a worn/aged appearance.

Powertex Stone Art Medusa jug by Shell North
Powertex Medusa jug by Shell North

Handy tip

TOP TIP To get even coverage with stone art, why not use a pasta machine to roll out your clay all in one equally level sheet. I have found many cheap second hand ones for £5 in charity shops! Just make sure your clay is not sticky before rolling through.

Did you see Kore’s planet canvas recently? I was hugely inspired by it so if you missed it, find it here and you too may find inspiration.

Hope you enjoyed this article? If so please comment below or share your inspiration on the Facebook Powertex Studio page.

Well that’s all for me this month,

Peace, love and a little splash of wine from my jug 😉

Shell xxx

Roman Column

Designer – Patricia Williams

As the theme for this month is the Roman Empire, for this article my thoughts turned to all those wonderful columns. They are quite majestic as they tower above us reaching for the sky. Before I started work on my project, I researched styles so I could get a feel for where I was heading.

Roman Column with Powertex by Patricia Williams Alex Henry
Powertex Roman Column

Materials list

Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener

Stone Art

Brown Bister

Yellow ochre Powertex Fabric Hardener

Corrugated cardboard

MDF or wood squares

Building My Column

Corrugated card column

I started by rolling my corrugated cardboard to size. Use a former underneath if you wish. The centre of a large tin foil would do to give it a bit of strength. Glue firmly together using Powertex Fabrc Hardener and leave to dry.

Add Stone Art

I gave my column a good covering of Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener and rubbed in a generous layer of Stone Art. I left it to settle while doing the same for the top and bottom of my Column. Repeating this stage a second time made sure it was well covered. 

Cover the card with Powertex and Stone Art

Spray with Bister

I finished by spraying generously with Brown Bister. This did give it a lovely look of worn stone. I left it all to dry overnight.

The Finishing Touches

I started to work on my decoration, I made scrolls from the corrugated cardboard I had used for the main structure, this worked well and added that extra touch.  I used the same technique of coating with Powertex and rubbing in Stone Art, attaching these to the column with a dab of Ivory Powertex.

Happy with that it was now onto dry brushing,  I decided to keep it simple and dry brush with Yellow Ochre and Ivory Powertex.

Powertex Roman Column with Stone Art
Powertex Roman Column by Patricia Wiliams

I am pleased with the result, what do you think? Would look great just standing in a corner of the garden or as a plinth for another one of your Powertex creations, its nice to elevate pieces of work to create layers and depths to a display.

I would love to see some of your makes so why not show them on The Powertex Studio. Also, if you would like to see more of my work pop over to Alex Henry on FB. I work in a wide variety of styles.

There are also lots of other fabulous articles on the Powertex Magazine, be sure to check them out they make very good reading and fill you with inspiration.

Thank you for reading I will be back again with more articles,

Patricia

Roman Chalice in Powertex

Designer – Jinny Holt

Our theme for this month was Roman Empire/Julius Caesar. I wanted to do a lot from this theme but I decided to make a Powertex Roman chalice.

I searched online for some ideas and already had a large brandy type glass, that I knew would be perfect for this article.

Did you know…

July is the seventh month of the year and the fourth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. It was named by the Roman Senate in honour of Roman general Julius Caesar, it being the month of his birth. Prior to that, it was called Quintilis, being the fifth month of the 10-month calendar.

How I made my Roman Chalice

Materials list

Powertex supplies
Items used for Roman Chalice

Prepare the glass

I started by using masking tape to cover the glass.

TOP TIP This is the best way to prepare the surface when using glass or plastic items.

Cover glass with Masking tape before using Powertex
Masking tape is your friend

Add fabric and clay

I dipped lace and material into IVORY POWERTEX Fabric Hardener and added to my glass. I used air dry clay to make mouldings as they reminded me of Roman shapes.

TIP… You could always mix Powertex Fabric Hardener with STONE ART to make your own clay.

Add fabric and clay textures
Fabric and clay textures

Coat the surface

Next I coated the whole piece with Ivory Powertex and rubbed in the Stone Art and let dry.

Remove the excess

I rubbed off any excess Stone Art with my hands.

Remove excess Stone Art
Stone Art applied

Paint the surface

I painted the whole thing with BLACK POWERCOLOR mixed with Easy Varnish and let it dry.

Add highlights

Mix a dry paint with Easy Varnish and SILVER Colortricx powder pigment and dry brush to add highlights.

Dry brush with Silver pigment
Chalice fit for any Emperor

Here’s a close up of my Roman Chalice.

Close up of Roman Chalice with Powertex

I hope you have enjoyed seeing how I accomplished this project. If you have been inspired by mine or any of my fellow design team members, you could always come and say hello on the THE POWERTEX STUDIO. Don’t be shy to upload any photos of projects you have created too.

You can get all your Powertex goodies at POWERTEX UK.

I post all my other creations at MUMS SHED on Facebook. Find Powertex on PINTEREST and INSTAGRAM too.

So until next time.

~LIVE~LOVE~LAUGH~CREATE~

Jinny

Mosaic Madness

Designer – Annette Smyth

Hello Everyone, this month’s theme of Ancient Rome has got me really excited.

Why I hear you ask?…….Well, my Dad was born in the village of North Leigh in Oxfordshire.  It is here that the remains of one of the largest Roman villas can be found.  At its height, around the early 4th century it had 4 bath suites, 16 mosaic floors and 11 rooms with underfloor heating.  I expect the inhabitants found our climate a little cool!  

Mosaic madness

It was the mosaic floors that really grabbed my imagination and so I did a bit more digging into their symbolic meaning.  I found that homes often had a mosaic with medusa in. This was considered a lucky talisman as  it was thought to ward off evil,  as her stare would turn the viewer to stone.

Powertex Mosaic Madness by Annette Smyth

I immediately thought of using stone art to create the tiles and rather than Medusa I chose to use the Green man plaster , a more gentle image. The piece needed to be rustic and aged so bister was the perfect choice and having missing and misplaced tiles around the edge also gives it a timeworn feel.

If you would like to read more about the history of the villa please click here.

Materials List

Mdf circle or old hardboard place mat – mine was 28cm wide
Ivory Powertex Universal Medium
Stone Art
Green Man Plaster face
Brown Bister
Colortricx pigments – Red Ochre, Yellow Ochre, White, Mocha, Ultramarine blue
Easy Varnish
Powerwax (can be replaced with Stone Art see step 12)

You will also need
Non stick rolling pin
2 pieces of wood to be used as guides for rolling out your clay in step 2 – mine were just under 1cm thick 

1 Make Stone Art clay

Make the Stone Art clay by mixing the Ivory Powertex with the Stone Art.

2 Roll out the clay

Using the wooden guides, roll out the clay on a non stick surface.

Using guides allows you to roll to the same depth each time.

Texture added with sponge

3 Adding texture

Using a texture sponge, press into the clay to create texture then cut up into 1cm squares with scissors.

4 Dry enough tiles

Place these tiles to one side to start to dry.  I used 122 on my piece.

Designer tip – make spare tiles to test dry brushing colours on later.

5 Paint the base

Paint both sides of your base with Ivory Powertex and dry.

Place the plaster face on the base and roughly draw around it.

6 Make up your “grout”

Make up a paste of Stone Art powder and Ivory Powertex.  Think of this as your grout.

7 Attach the plaster face

Place some paste inside the line for your plaster face, paint the back of the plaster with Ivory Powertex and then place onto the base.

8 Place your tiles

Spread out more of paste, in a thickish layer, around the face and start placing your tiles in your chosen pattern.  

Mosaic sprayed with Bister

9 Spray with Bister

Spray with a light misting of brown bister and leave to dry overnight.

10 Add colour to the face

With a damp sponge, remove excess bister.

Using the Red and Yellow Ochre pigments mixed with Easy Varnish colour the plaster face.

Add Ultramarine Blue to the eyes.

Dry brushing the tiles

11 Colour the tiles

Using the Red Ochre, Yellow Ochre and Mocha pigments with Easy Varnish I coloured the outside 2 circles of tiles.

12 Colour the grout

Using Powerwax mixed with Yellow Ochre I created a paste to fill in the gaps between the tiles and up to the plaster.  Remove excess with a damp sponge.

Allow to dry overnight and polish with a soft cloth.

Top tip

Why not try using the Stone Art paste mixed with Yellow Ochre if you don’t have any Powerwax.

I have really enjoyed creating this piece and can see so many more projects that would work well with this technique. How about making your own plaque with your house number on?

I would love to know what you create following this article. Why not share your creations on the Powertex Studio Facebook group.

If you would like to see more inspiration ideas why not have a look at my previous article or join me for a workshop at my home studio.

Until next time, Happy Creative Adventures………Axx

Sweet dreams upon a Powertex night sky

By Shell North

I love the simplicity of using something like string or twine and knots to create something magical and unique. Wanting to step away from the full circle dream catcher I drafted a moon with star idea for sweet dreams.

I wanted to use techniques to create vegan feathers with twine. A lot of my past customers have been vegan and dislike the use of animal products so creating an ethical dream catcher was up there on my to do list. Created with a ‘boho’ style making from twine, a recycled lampshade ring, recycled jewellery (charity shop) and Ivory Powertex to make weatherproof for outdoor use.

Powertex sweet dreams dream catcher by Shell North
Dream Catcher by Shell North

What are dream catchers exactly?

Sometimes referred to as “Sacred Hoops”, Ojibwe dream catchers were traditionally used as talismans to protect sleeping people, usually children, from bad dreams and nightmares. Native Americans believe that the night air is filled with dreams, both good and bad.

When hung above the bed in a place where the morning sunlight can hit it, the dream catcher attracts and catches all sorts of dreams and thoughts into its webs. Good dreams pass through and gently slide down the feathers to comfort the sleeper below. Bad dreams, however, are caught up in its protective net and destroyed, burned up in the light of day.

Sweet dreams

Make as a soothing tool for kids! I made dream catchers for my children when they were young. Explaining how these would help ease their nightmares, quite handy indeed.

Call it a placebo effect for non-believers but my children believed what I said and they worked at soothing their nightmares, happy days!

Note – Use real feathers with children however as the twine ones will be slightly shape and pointy when hardened.

Putting it all together

Twine dream catcher for sweet dreams by Shell North
Pre Powertexed dream catcher by Shell North

I made the twine feathers first, using a knotting technique  around a length of twine, next I wrapped the lampshade hoop with twine. Using the standard catcher webbing but didn’t go all the way around so I could create the moon shape. I added a hanging beach wood cut star and then covered everything in Ivory Powertex hardener.

Finally once dry I finished by attaching the junk jewellery and beads I have collected from car boot sales, donations or charity shops. I don’t think I’m going to colour this, I like the simplicity of it. I enjoyed this so much I think I’m going to re-purpose some more broken lamp shades though and create different colours!

Sweet dreams dream catcher with Ivory Powertex by Shell North

Inspired?

Why not try create one of your own sweet dreams and share on our Powertex studio group page on Facebook? We always love to see what you create that’s inspired by our blogs. Also don’t forget to comment below. What would you have done differently? Does this inspire you to create your own? Share your inspired dream catcher in the Facebook group.

Did you like my charity shop upcycles here? Catch my February blog where I used a lot of recycled items along with the Secret Art Box subscription box.

The subscription boxes are exciting boxes of exclusive Powertex goodies that are delivered to your door each month! Don’t miss out on the fun, get yours today HERE .

Well that’s all from me this month,

Peace, love and sweet dreams,

Shell x

Powertex planets canvas art

Designer – Kore Sage

Powertex planets are a fun and easy canvas project to try. It doesn’t take much in the way of supplies and if you’ve used stencils or masks before you’re half way there! With Powertex you really can use basic techniques for amazing results.

Powertex planets canvas art by Kore Sage using Blue Powertex and Bister sprays
Powertex planets canvas art by Kore Sage

Materials list

  • Canvas – I used an inexpensive rectangular canvas
  • Blue and Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener
  • Ready Made Bister sprays in Black, Red, Yellow and Green
  • Stiff cardboard to cut own circular masks
  • Hairdryer

Prepare your canvas and card circles

Prep your canvas with Blue Powertex Fabric Hardener and while it’s drying cut your circle masks. Draw around plates or lids and carefully cut out. Keep both parts.

Prepare your canvas and cut card circle masks.
Step 1 Preparing your canvas and circles

Spray the background

Arrange your circular masks. Darken the background with Black Bister Spray. Vary the amount around the canvas. Leave this to dry naturally.

Spray the background with Bister spray in Black
Spray the background with Black Bister

Paint the planets

Swap the mask for the stencil on each planet and paint the circle with a layer of Ivory Powertex, not too thin. Do one at a time!

Swap to the stencil and apply a layer of Ivory Powertex
Swap to the stencil and apply a layer of Ivory Powertex

Spray the Bister

While the Powertex is still wet, leave the stencil in place and spray generously with Bister in your chosen colour. Notice I’ve protected the canvas.

Spraying Bister onto wet Powertex
Spray Bister onto wet Powertex

Create the Bister crackles

Heat the Bister with a hairdryer until cracks start to form in the surface. A heatgun or tool can be too hot for this. Repeat these steps for all your planets.

Using a hairdryer to create Bister crackles
Heat the Bister until crackles form

Starry night

Put half a teaspoon of Ivory Powertex on a plate and use a very wet paintbrush to splatter it across the surface for stars. I had a practice on paper first!

Use a wet paintbrush to spray on stars with Ivory Fabric Hardener
Adding stars with Ivory Powertex

Finishing touches

One of my planets had smeared a lot so I tidied it up with a bit of Blue Powertex and Black Bister when it was dry. I didn’t worry too much about the others and I thought they looked pretty good. I love the blue Powertex coming through the Black Bister too!

Powertex planets canvas by Kore Sage
Powertex planets canvas by Kore Sage

Top Tips for Powertex planets

Each planet will take a while to dry so be careful when masking the rest of your canvas. I used a piece of printer paper held near my planets while I sprayed them. Using more than one colour of Bister on a planet to give it a darker side helps them look dimensional. Try Easy Structure paste or 3d balls to add texture before you add Bister.

Thanks for reading my blog today. I hope you will have a go at painting your own Powertex planets! If you do, please share your art in the Powertex Facebook group as we love to see what you make.

If you like to see more of my Powertex art, you might like my under the sea mixed media project here on the magazine or you can follow me on Facebook or on my website where I love to share my Powertex tips and art.

Until next time, make time to let your art out!

Planet in the Night Sky

A fantasy planet

Designer – Jill Cullum

Planet in the night sky in Powertex by Jill Cullum
Powertex Planet in the Night Sky by Jill Cullum

For my planet in the night sky, inspiration came from warm summer nights, sat in the garden, looking out for shooting stars. I decided to try and replicate one of the planets. Hmmm, once started though, my imagination overtook and the finished article became much more magical.

Easy 3d flex makes beautiful cracks and texture. Experiment using different mediums to add colours. Here I have used layers of inks and acrylics, with a final layer of wax.

As you will see from the photographs, things changed along the way. This is what I love about mixed media. Some layers get covered, some peak through. It’s all part of the journey of creating what you love. Just go with it!

The Secret Art Loft acrylics and inks work wonderfully for layering up. Their translucent quality makes blending easy, and the metallic inks look like molten metal.

Top tip

I find it is really important with mixed media, to let each layer dry thoroughly before moving onto the next. Not an easy one for me, as I am an impatient crafter. However, your layers will become muddy if they aren’t dry.

Materials list

Creating a base

Creating a base for the planet with Powertex
Step 1 – creating a base

Pour Powertex liquid colour onto the canvas. Spray with Bister of a different colour then dry with a hairdryer, to create the crackle effect.

Add texture by creating a heavy crackle effect

Adding more texture to your planet base with Easy 3d Flex
Step 2 – adding texture

Mix Easy 3d flex with Ivory Powertex to create a clay. Layer over half of the canvas. Dry with hair-dryer spraying lightly with blue bister during the process.

Creating further texture

Use Powertex and fabric and clay to add texture layers to your planet
Step 3 – creating further texture

Using material, coated in Ivory Powertex and small ‘craters’ made from the 3d flex clay, build the layers of your planet.

Adding colour

Add green colours to the cracked areas of the planet
Step 4 – adding colour

Start by adding green ink to the deep cracked area and violet acrylic to the green side of the planet.

Building layers

add clay craters and shapes to the surface
Step 5 – building layers

Using greens, pinks and purples, layer the craters, blending as you go. Paint the material section with black acrylic, then add layers of metallic acrylic.

Powerwax

Use Powerwax mixed with powder pigment to layer on colour to your planet textures
Step 6 – Powerwax

On the side created by 3d flex, add a layer of Powerwax, mixed with pigment. Once dry, wipe with a damp sponge to add interest.

Finishing Touches

I decided my fantasy planet needed a touch more ‘bling’ so I added a few beads, blending in with the colours I had chosen along the way. The joys of creating a fantasy planet are that you can really be free with your choice of colours and the texture that you create. It’s nice not to be too rigid in your planning, as planets evolve, then so should a piece of art.

Planet in the night sky

Powertex planet in the night sky by Jill Cullum
Powertex planet in the night sky

I am looking forward to seeing lots of new planets, so feel free to share them in the Powertex Studio.

If you would like further planet inspiration take a look at this blog from Annette Smyth. Or why not join me for a workshop to create your own planet. Bye for now, Jill x

Ugly Ocean Fish Sculpture

Powertex Fish Sculpture by Jinny Holt

Designer: Jinny Holt

For this months article my theme was Fish Sculpture. So this got me thinking about the ocean and all the plastic that is killing off all the fish and other sea life in our waters.

Plastics and Powertex

Right now it’s estimated that over 12 million tonnes of plastic – everything from plastic bottles and bags to microbeads – end up in our oceans each year. That’s a lorry load of rubbish a minute.

Traveling on ocean currents this plastic is now turning up in every corner of our planet – from Cornish beaches to uninhabited Pacific islands. It is even being found trapped in Arctic ice.

So I executed my article on these facts above and this is a reason why I love using Powertex as my art medium of choice. We can slowly, one piece of plastic at a time reduce our plastic waste by turning it into art.

Supplies

Items needed

Ivory Powertex Universal Medium

Stone Art

Powercolor Pigments in Brown and Green

Polystyrene egg

Kitchen paper, plastic bottle, cardboard strips, textures from stash

Craft wire

Small canvas base

Step 1

For this article, I started by placing some cut wire lengths into the medium-sized polystyrene egg to create a basic fish shape. Some kitchen roll (which is tucked behind the other fibers) and painted it with the IVORY POWERTEX.

Basic fish shape

Step 2

It needed a nose, so I made up some clay by mixing STONE ART and the Ivory Powertex together. I then proceeded to cover the rest of the fish shape in kitchen roll and Powertex.

I added lace for the fins and dried these with a hair dryer to add movement to them.

Powertex fish by Jinny Holt
Added lace for the fins

Step 3

I then set about painting my fish with the PIGMENT POWDERS and Powertex varnish and I put this aside to dry.

I next got the canvas as this is going to be my base for the sculpture. Create the texture by painting on the Ivory Powertex and sprinkling on some sand, kitchen roll and textures from my stash. I set this aside to dry.

Powertex textured canvas
canvas as base

Step 4

I took the plastic bottle and cut a slit up one side of it, so I could add in my painted fish.

Powertex fish sculpture
Slit in plastic bottle

Now the best bit

I then painted the canvas in yellow and green Powertex pigment. I cut the bottle at an angle at the bottom and then adhered it to the canvas. To help hold up the bottle I used some dried moss and shells I had in my stash.

I dry brushed on the complete sculpture with brown pigment and added colour to some of the moss to depict coral. The seaweed is cardboard strips soaked in Ivory Powertex and painted with green pigment. Add them behind the bottle to create the scene.

Ugly ocean fish sculpture
Ugly Ocean Fish Sculpture

Food for thought

So I aim to use as much recycled plastic as I can in my artwork at least I know I am doing my bit to help save our planet.

If I am the rest of the Powertex Design team have left you inspired, we would love to see some of your creations at THE POWERTEX STUDIO over on Facebook. You can also get loads of Powertex inspiration over on Pinterest and Instagram.

Find me sharing my latest makes over on MUMS SHED.

Thank you for reading my article for this month. Did you catch my dragon eggs article from last month?

Live~Love~Laugh~Create

Jinny

Clowning around with Powertex Clownfish

Powertex Clownfish sculptures by Annette Smyth

By Annette Smyth

Powertex Clownfish sculptures by Annette Smyth
Clown Fish

Hello everyone and welcome to my latest article.  I was so excited when I found out the theme for this month was UNDER THE SEA.  I love anything connected with the ocean.  So much so that I think I could have been a mermaid in another lifetime. In fact my dream home is next to the sea with an airy, light cliff top studio looking over the waves and beach – I did say it was dream!

My inspiration for my creation came from old photographs I had taken during a diving holiday.  Whilst flipping through the album these cute little clownfish kept appearing time and time again. Obviously they were crying out to be made into a sculpture.

I like to use StoneArt clay for my Powertex clownfish sculptures.  Making my clay up and giving it time to rest before using it, I find gives me the best results.  Resting it overnight double wrapped in clingfilm in my usual method.

DID YOU KNOW –  Stone Art clay will keep for at least two weeks if kept in an airtight wrapping.  

Materials List
Kitchen foil
Masking tape
Ivory Powertex Universal Medium
Powertex Stone Art
Powercolor pigments – White, Orange, black
Powertex Easy Varnish
2 black glass eyes on metal wire

You will also need 
Plastic gloves
Paintbrush
Plastic container to pour Powertex into and mix Stone Art clay in

Create Clownfish Armature

  1. Using the foil, form a teardrop shape with slightly pointed ends and flat bottom approximately 10cm long and 2cm thick – don’t worry about fins, they come at the clay stage

2.  Cover the shape with masking tape

3. Paint with a layer of Ivory Powertex Universal Medium

Adding Stone Art clay

Powertex Clownfish Stone Art clay

4. Make Stone Art clay using Ivory Powertex – see the “how to” video from my previous article here.

5. Cover your fish with clay.  Blend the joins together with a slightly damp finger.  Pinch the clay away from the body to create the fins and tail.  

6. Place the eyes in position and push through the clay into the underlying tape and foil.  Leave aside to dry.

TOP TIP – Use a pointy tool or cocktail stick to make the hole for the eyes as this will go through the tape more easily.

Adding colour

7. Using the easy varnish and orange pigment dry brush the stripes onto the fish. See “how to” video here.

8.  Now repeat with the white pigment filling in the gaps between the orange stripes.

9. Finally using the black pigment paint thin lines where the orange and white stripes meet and dry brush black around the fins and tail.

I decide to create a soft coral for my fish to sit in using an old cotton mop head and Ivory Powertex.  

Powertex Clownfish by Annette Smyth
Clown fish in coral

Just think of all the other fish and sea creatures you could create. Have you seen the amazing Powertex Ammonite Light article by Jill Cullum. Your sea babies would look fantastic nestled into this.

I would love to see what you come up with.  Why not leave your comments on this article below and share your makes in the Powertex Studio group on Facebook.  

Until next time Happy Creative Adventures and remember you can always find me on my Facebook page and on my website.

Axx

Powertex DIY Lamp

Powertex DIY Lamp by Kore Sage

Designer: Kore Sage

Make a Powertex DIY lamp for lovely gifts or home decor and with Powertex you can make your own. Powertex fabric sculpture and fairy lights are an easy way to craft a lamp. I’m using battery powered LED fairy lights. Be sure to use LED lights for you project as these keep cool. Do not use a flame candle in this lamp.

I’m Kore and I want to show you how I made my own Powertex lamp using a bottle for a “mould”, simple Powertex techniques and a pack of battery LED fairy lights. Choose your own favourite embellishments to create the lamp in your own style. I’m using white fairy lights but coloured lights would be lovely too.

Powertex Lamp with LED fairy lights
Powertex DIY Lamp

Materials list

Powertex Universal Medium in Ivory

Ready Made Bister Spray in Blue

Colortricx pigment in Rich Gold

Easy Varnish

A large bottle or container for a mould

A plastic bag

Masking tape

Cotton fabric strips about 2″ – 3″ wide and a square for the bottom

MDF Dropouts

MDF Alphabet

3d Balls

Battery powered LED fairy lights

Prepare a mould

Wrap your bottle with plastic and secure with small pieces of tape. Don’t wrap too tight and ensure there are no holes.

Wrap the bottle in plastic
Step one

Wrap the bottle

Using fabric with Powertex, cover the bottom of the bottle first and apply strips in spirals upwards. Leave gaps in the wrapping for the light.

Use Powertex with fabric to wrap the bottle
Step two
Leave to dry for a few hours before removing the bottle

Decorate with embellishments

I used Powertex Ivory to add some 3d balls, mdf drop outs and letters. The structure is sturdy but avoid heavy embellishments at the top.

Add embellishments
Step three

Colour with Bister spray

Spray generously with Ready Made Bister Spray. Don’t forget the underneath, I left the inside Ivory.

Spray generously with Blue Bister
Step four

Create highlights

I used a damp cloth to wipe back some of the Bister from the raised textures.

Wipe away Bister form textures with a damp cloth
Step five

Add some shine

Metallics add a little extra shine on a lamp. I mixed Rich Gold powder pigment with Easy Varnish and dry brushed some textures.

Dry brush with Rick Gold pigment
Step six
Powertex DIY Lamp Insert LED lights for a lovely glow
Insert the LED lights for a lovely glow

I hope you have a go at making a lamp. Do share your creations with us in the Facebook group at Powertex Addicts United. If you’ve enjoyed this idea you might also want to take a look at Donna’s bottle light project too.

You can find more of my art and Powertex at Kore Sage Art but until next time, I hope you find some time to let your art out.