Powertex Christmas decorations

If you’re looking for Powertex craft and mixed media projects for Christmas or Winter home decorations then we’ve got what you need. These projects have all been featured in the Powertex UK Magazine with step by step tutorials to show you how to make them.

The Design Team have created some beautiful projects for you to make at home, from tree decorations to Winter wall art. Take your pick from these inspirational Powertex Christmas creations and crack open the Powertex this weekend!

Mixed media Christmas by the Powertex UK design team

Star decorations by Fiona

These simple star tree ornaments are a classic and pretty handmade addition to your tree this year. Use Stone Art for a soft snowy texture.

Powertex and Stone art star by Fiona Potter
Powertex star by Fiona Potter

Textured Baubles by Jinny

Tree ornaments can be as simple or detailed as you like and Jinny has some great tips for creating your own. Fabrics and texture products alter polystyrene balls.

Powertex textured Christmas Bauble by Jinny Holt
Textured baubles by Jinny Holt

Reindeer, robin and pudding baubles by Anna

These fun Powertex baubles can even be made with the kids. Reindeer, robin and Christmas pudding baubles make adorable gifts too. Anna mixes some Stone Art clay for these.

Reindeer, robin and Christmas pudding baubles by Anna Howlett
Reindeer, robin and pudding by Anna Howlett

Mixed media ornaments by Anna

Mini trees and baubles are a fun and easy craft and Anna shows you how with cones, balls and fabric scraps. Choose your favourite colours for the perfect Christmas display.

Powertex Christmas tree by Anna Howlett
Powertex ornaments by Anna Howlett

Three kings by Donna

These three kings by Donna could inspire a stunning Nativity scene. Donna dresses her figures with Powertex as a fabric hardener.

Three kings by Donna
Three kings by Donna McGhie

Shimmering Wreath

Do you hang a wreath on your door at Christmas? A Powertex wreath can be made weatherproof for outdoors. Add plenty of sparkle with pearl or your favourite metallic Colortricx pigments and Easy Varnish.

Shimmering Powertex Christmas wreath by Kore Sage
Shimmering wreath by Kore Sage

Winter scene by Jill

If you’re looking to create a Winter wall art with your Powertex, Jill uses her craft supplies with Powertex to make a beautiful mixed media Winter scene.

Winter scene Powertex art by Jill Cullum

Gonzo baubles by Abigail

More fun tree ornaments and this time, Abigail uses a favourite festive character to inspire her decorations. If you’d like to try out your sculpture skills, this will be fun for you.

Gonzo Powertex bauble by Abigail Lagden
Gonzo bauble by Abigail Lagden

Get more ideas, inspiration and tips

We hope these ideas have inspired you to try some handmade Christmas decorations this year. They can become treasured crafts that you bring out every year.

All the supplies for these design team projects were from Powertex UK, the UK distributor of Powertex products.

If you would like to keep up to date with the latest from Powertex Addicts you can follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

My Favourite Artist? …Nature!

Designer: Abigail Lagden

This month, I was asked to write about my favourite artist and how their style inspires/influences my work. Surely this should be quite easy, except the more I thought about it, the more I realised I don’t have a favourite ‘artist’ or even any one particular style I like more than another.

I see art in so many different things, made by many different creative people who may be makers, designers or artists, but may also be architects, engineers or builders. In fact I’m often more impressed by a dry stone wall, a knotted rope or a window display than by traditional art.

However, more often than not, the things that truly amaze and intrigue me, the things that make me stop and think are the things created by Nature. These are the things I feel the need to surround myself with, the things that make me smile and the things that feed my imagination.

I love all things magical and whimsical, and who does magic and whimsy better than Nature? Twisted tree roots and holes in tree trunks; magical waterfalls and still pools of water; mysterious caves that can only be reached by sea…

Hardraw Force, nr Hawes

Texture, pattern and colour

I love textures and who does texture better than nature? Velvety soft catkins; smooth, rounded pebbles; jagged, grooved tree barks…

I love patterns and who does patterns better than nature? The symmetry of snowflakes; the perfect spirals of shells; honeycomb made by bees, the scales on a snake…

I love colours and who does colour better than nature? The bright, fun colours of flowers; the warm fiery colours of autumn; the endless hues, shades and tones of green, the magic of a rainbow…

I love smells and nature does some of the best smells (although it does some of the worst too). The smell of rain after a long dry spell; the smell of wild garlic in the woods; the wonderful fresh smell of honeysuckle…

So, after a great deal of thought, I have to admit that my favourite artist is simply Nature.

Nature feeds my imagination. It makes me think of secret, hidden worlds with mysterious creatures and strange plants. These magical, secret worlds are where my creations come from and I hope this is where they will take people.

See my creations in the Magazine, or come and join me in my Curiously Contrary world of creativity.

Until next time,

Abs xx

Stone Art Temple

Designed by – Abigail Lagden

Powertex Stone Art Temple by Abigail Lagden
Powertex Stone Art Temple by Abigail Lagden

When I received the Buddha themed goodies from the Hochanda shows, my mind was immediately drawn to the temple of Ta Prohm in Cambodia where trees grow through the ruins. Although I have never been lucky enough to visit, it is a place that has always intrigued me and sparked my imagination. So it is from there that I drew my inspiration this month for my Stone Art Temple.

Materials

How to Create a Stone Art Temple

Step 1

First, I used Easy Structure paste through a stencil from my stash. Create some swirly patterns on the front and sides of the box frame and on the base piece where the recess would be.

Powertex Easy Structure through a swirl stencil
Step 1

Step 2

I then used ivory Powertex to attach some of the MDF shapes around the edge of the base piece and to construct the middle square. You can also see that I drew around the outer square with pencil to provide a guide when applying the stone art.

Mdf frame and pieces, build the temple
Step 2

Step 3

Stone effects were created by coating the surfaces with a layer of ivory Powertex and firmly pressing the stone art onto it, before gently rubbing off the excess. I applied the stone art lightly over the stenciled pieces and more thickly on the base. I then used ivory Powertex to fix all of the pieces together.

Apply Stone Art to the Powertex
Step 3

Step 4

I painted the plaster Buddha statue with black Powertex, let it dry and then painted it using rich gold Colortricx powder mixed with Easy Varnish. I secured the statue into the recess using ivory Powertex and surrounded it with large, medium and small 3D balls mixed with ivory Powertex.

Paint the plaster Buddha with Black Powertex and Gold Colortricx
Step 4

Step 5

The whole piece was sprayed with black and green Bister sprays.

Spray with Bister sprays in Black and Green
Step 5

Step 6

I mixed ivory and black Powertex together with some green Powercolor pigment to create a grey/green medium. I used this to coat some pieces of natural paper decoration and gently stretched them to create stringy tree roots across the box.

Paperdecoration
Step 6

The final step was to dry brush the whole piece using ivory Powertex to really enhance all the ‘stone’ textures. I also added a few blush tones using red and white Powercolor pigments mixed with Easy Varnish.

Powertex stone art temple close up
Finishing touches
Powertex temple by Abigail Lagden

If you treated yourself to any of the new products showcased on Hochanda in September, we’d love to see what you created. Please share your pictures in The Powertex Studio facebook group.

If you’d like to see more of what I am up to you can follow my Curiously Contrary Facebook page. If you’d like to find out about workshops that I am running please visit my website www.curiously-contrary.co.uk

You can also see another project of mine, the mixed media hanging heart tutorial here on the magazine.

Until next time, Abs xx

Becoming a Powertex tutor

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be a Powertex tutor? Our tutors come from different backgrounds and have built creative businesses that suit them, from weekend crafty meet-ups to full time, social entrepreneur. Read their stories and if you think you have what it takes to be a Powertex tutor, get in touch.

Tutor retreat Abyssimo workshop Powertex UK
Powertex UK with Abyssimo Workshop 2019

Building a dream

Abigail Lagden Powertex tutor
Abigail Lagden from Curiously Contrary

Abigail from Curiously Contrary says “Being made redundant was the push that I needed to properly consider developing my part time creative practice into a business. It has been a lot of hard work and a steep learning curve but it has also been fantastic fun and infinitely rewarding. I still have to pinch myself to make sure it isn’t all a dream and I have absolutely no plans to go back to having a ‘real job’ any time soon!”

Does this sound like your dream come true? Find out more about becoming a Powertex tutor by emailing Michele at Powertex UK.

Tutor Training

Training in the different products and techniques is available and you can succeed with hard work and supported by Powertex UK and fellow tutors. Every tutor runs their own unique workshops, allowing them to be creative with the products and offer something personal. There are now Powertex Academies across England offering tutor training too.

Supporting and encouraging others

Jaxs from Vintage Crafts by Jaxs says “I discovered Powertex and loved it straight away and I’ve been a tutor just over a year. I’m also a Slimming world consultant and a Zumba instructor. My Saturdays are free so that’s usually when I’m doing workshops. I’d say to anyone thinking about becoming a tutor, Go for it!!!! It’s that moment when your students see the finished item and their face is saying wow, it makes me think yep, I’m glad I did this.”

Do you love watching others create and succeed like Jaxs? Take a look at Powertex UK on Facebook to see what we’re about.

Giving back to the community

Donna Mcghie Powertex workshop with Donna Mcghie Art and Murals
Donna Mcghie Art and Murals

Donna from Art and Murals says “I love running Powertex workshops because they enable me to make a contribution to the Royal Papworth Hospital Charity. I call my workshops Art 4 A Heart Workshops and a part of my profits gets donated to the hospital as my way of saying thank you for giving me back my husband when he had his heart transplant.

I get the freedom of running my business as an independent business woman, with the added bonus of the support and advice from my fellow tutors and the guys at headquarters if I need it. Win win really.”

Would you like to run a socially minded creative business like Donna?

Sharing experience

Dawn Culver Powertex Tutor
Powertex tutor Dawn Culver

Dawn from Daybreak Crafts says “I have crafted for a number of years, right back to the 1980’s when I used to create cross stitched items to sell at craft fairs. One of my friends owned a well known craft company and offered me a job. Whilst I was working on a stand at the NEC, I met Tracey Evans and loved what she was demoing. I mentioned to Tracey I would be interested in becoming a tutor and did my training. I am currently in the process of selling off all my ‘clean’ crafting items as I have concluded I am not a clean crafter and much prefer mixed media type crafting.”

Are you looking to share your crafting experience like Dawn?

Getting creative and making friends

Bridget Griffiths Magic Garden Lyddle Folk, Powertex Tutor
Bridget from Magic Garden – Lyddle Folk

Bridget from Magic Garden – Lyddle Folk says “During the week I’m a meticulously tidy, organised accounts assistant. At the weekend I’m up to my elbows in Powertex letting my imagination run free and helping others to do the same. I do the workshops in my dining room with groups of 3-4 or one to ones. I’m able to do one or two a month, with the odd commission thrown in.

Most of my customers just want the chance to get out, have fun and meet others. The fact that they are so delighted by what they achieve is a bonus. Whether I do a whole day or just a half day, the workshops are always something I look forward to.”

Do you want to get creative and connect with other like minded people like Bridget?

Find out more about becoming a tutor

If you’re passionate about Powertex and would love to share it with others through your own creative business, we’d love to hear from you. Email Michele at Powertex UK if you think being a Certified Powertex Tutor is for you. You can also find us on Facebook. We’re looking forward to hearing from you.

If you’d like to see what some of our tutors are creating, browse the Design Team articles on the Powertex UK Mixed Media Magazine.

Horned Headpiece using Powertex

Designer: Abigail Lagden

This month we were given the challenge of recreating a project created by one of our fellow Design Team members. When I heard this, I knew exactly which project I wanted to try… Shell North’s fabulous Taurus Headdress from earlier this year. I loved every second of making my version, this horned headpiece.

Her step by step instructions were easy to follow and allowed me to put my own twist on the project. I sculpted curly horns rather than straight. Rather than adding silk flowers at the end I used flowers coated with bronze Powertex universal medium. I coloured them with powertex pigments.

Sculpting wearable art, horns sculpted. By Abigail Lagden
Horns sculpted from foil
Creating a wearable art By Abigail Lagden
Horns attached to base headband
Powertex fabric sculpture By Abigail Lagden
Wrapped with Powertex coated fabric
Powertex flowers added. By Abigail Lagden
Flowers added

It took me a couple of days to decide on the right colour for this piece. I was very tempted to go for rainbow horns but in the end went for something a bit more simple and I hope, sophisticated. Bronze gold over the horns and a mix of reds, oranges and yellows for the flowers.

Powertex horned headpiece wearable art by Abigail Lagden
Horned Headpiece by Abigail Lagden

Keep an eye on my Curiously Contrary facebook page to see where they turn up – I can’t wait to show them off.

Horned Headpiece by Abigail Lagden

If you’ve been thinking of trying one of the projects you’ve seen in the Powertex magazine then go for it. There are so many step by step articles that will guide you through lots of different projects. You are sure to find something to suit your style. Please do share your creations in our Powertex Studio facebook group.

If you’d like to see the inspiration for my horned headpiece, revisit Shell’s original article for her fabulous Taurus Headdress.

If you’d like to see more information about my upcoming workshops, please visit my Curiously Contrary website.

Until next time

Abs xx

Leo the Powertex Lion

Designer – Abigail Lagden

Every now and then I have to grudgingly accept that a brush has gone past it’s usable life as a brush. The clue is usually when only the top 2mm of the bristles bend! However, I hate to throw things away, so I have almost three years worth of dud brushes hoarded away, awaiting a purpose. Well, that purpose has finally arrived and here is Leo the Lion to give a few of them a new life.

Leo the Lion

One of my favourite animals has to be the beautiful and majestic lion. Not really very surprising as my star sign is Leo. So when I was asked to create an animal sculpture using recycled materials, it just had to be a lion using my dud brushes.

Leo the Powertex lion by Abigail Lagden.
Leo the Powertex Lion by Abigail Lagden

Materials List

Step by Step Guide

Remove the brush heads

Firstly, I removed the brush heads from the 14 old brushes (tip: soaking in boiling water will help loosen the adhesive).

Removing the brush heads
Step 1

Arrange the brush heads

The brush heads were then arranged in a sunburst to created the outline of the lion’s mane.

Create the mane with brush heads
Step 2

Stone Art clay

I mixed stone art with bronze Powertex universal medium to form a clay and used this to hold the brush head arrangement together.

Use Powertex Stone Art clay to hold the brush heads together.
Step 3

Sculpt the face

I then built up the central area using some tin foil before sculpting the face of my lion over the top with the bronze stone art clay.

Sculpt the face
Step 4

Create the mane

To create the lion’s mane, I used pieces of powercotton soaked in bronze Powertex universal medium. For the whiskers I used some of the bristles from the brushes.

Add Powertex Powercotton mane
Step 5

Dry brushing

Finally, I applied copper, bronze gold and rich gold Colortricx pigments mixed with easy varnish.

Dry brush technique to paint metallic pigments onto the lion.
Step 6

I hope you have enjoyed seeing how I created my Leo and that you are inspired to get creating your own project. Please do share any of your makes with us over in the Powertex Studio Facebook group.

If you like astrology themed projects, why not visit Shell’s article about how she made her stunning taurus inspired headdress.

You can also see more of what I’ve been creating and information about my workshops on my website and my Curiously Contrary facebook page.

Until next time, Abs xx

Powertex Easy 3D Flex

Product of the Month for July 2019

Easy 3D comes as a heavy powder that is mixed with Powertex Fabric Hardener to create a clay. The clay is like dough and can be applied to canvas art as well as sculpture. It’s designed to crack as it dries which can leave deep cracked textures in the surface.

If you would like to try some Easy 3D Flex for yourself you can find it at Powertex UK. Need a little help to make up the clay? Just go to the instruction sheet at the bottom.

Powertex Design Team examples

The Design Team love to use this clay. Here’s some examples of how they’ve used it in their creations.

Sheep sculpture with Easy 3D Flex by Annette Smyth
Sculpture by Annette Smyth
Powertex Mixed media canvas by Anna Emelia Howlett
Mixed media canvas by Anna Emelia Howlett
Soul Sister sculpture with Powertex Easy 3D Flex by Donna Mcghie
Soul sister by Donna Mcghie

This planet art project by Jill has a tutorial in the Magazine, click on the image to open.

Powertex planet with Easy 3D Flex by Jill Cullum
Planet art by Jill Cullum
Canvas art by Fiona Potter Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Canvas art by Fiona Potter
Luxury egg by Jinny Holt with Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Mixed media egg by Jinny Holt

Shell’s beautiful Mandala art also has a tutorial, click on the image to see her step by step blog.

Mandala wall art by Shell North Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Mandala art by Shell North

This art doll kit is highly textured. You can see how Abigail puts this together in her tutorial, click on the image.

Powertex Art doll by Abigail Lagden
Art doll by Abigail Lagden
Canvas art by Kore Sage with Powertex textures
Canvas by Kore Sage

Find other project tutorials in this online magazine, just use the search bar to look for Easy 3D Flex in the categories.

Head over to Powertex Addicts United and join our community group, The Powertex Studio, share your creations. If you have a creation using Easy 3D clay, we’d love to see your makes.

If these projects have inspired you to try, you can get your own Easy 3D Flex at Powertex UK. Don’t forget you can use all your Powertex pigments, inks, paints and bister to colour these textures.

Here’s how to use Powertex Easy 3D Flex

If you’d like to mix your own Easy 3D clay but can’t get to a tutor, this will help you out.

Powertex Easy 3D Flex instruction sheet Powertex UK Easy3Dflex
How to use Powertex Easy 3D Flex

Feeling Grey? It’s not a bad thing with Powertex.

Feeling grey? Using Lead grey Powertex Fabric hardener by Abigail Lagden

Feeling grey? One of the things that people often comment on when they see my creations, is the colours. Words such as rich, deep, bright and vibrant are common.

Therefore, they are often surprised to hear that almost all of them are made with either the bronze (brown) or the lead (grey) Powertex universal medium as the base colour.

Why Bronze & Lead for the Base Colour?

1. Final Colour Considerations

Bronze and lead are both neutral colours and therefore will look good when dry brushed using any of the powercolor pigments. In fact they are perfect for my signature rainbow colours created using Powercolor pigments!

Rainbox fairy house by Curiously Contrary
Rainbow fairy house with bronze base

If you start with a bold base colour such as red, blue, green, etc you have already limited what colours will work well on top and the final pieces can look a bit ‘flat’ and lacking in depth.

Fabric sculpted bottles by Curiously Contrary
The bottle on the left has green Powertex as the base colour, the middle bottle has black and the bottle on the right has a terracotta base. I think the middle bottle appears to have much more depth than the other two which look a little ‘flat’.

2. Depth vs Brightness

The thing I love most about fabric sculpting is the textures and depth that can be created. To create the illusion of greater depth, the colours within the folds of the fabric should be as dark compared to the top of the folds.

Therefore black and bronze Powertex will give you the appearance of greater depth. My preference is bronze as I like the warmth that it creates.

Rainbow dragon treasure chest by Abigail Lagden
This dragon’s treasure chest uses a bronze base colour, creating lots of depth.

Feeling grey?

To achieve a slightly lighter/brighter feel I use the lead Powertex. Whilst it loses just a little of the depth that bronze creates, the lighter base colour lifts the overall brightness of the piece.

Sea themed treasure chest by Curiously Contrary using Lead Grey Powertex Fabric Hardener
This sea-themed treasure chest has a lead base colour giving it a lighter, brighter feel.

Here are a few more of my creations to demonstrate the colours that can be achieved using black, bronze and grey Powertex with powercolor pigments :

Blue bird box by Curiously Contrary
Bird box created using lead Powertex with ultramarine blue and turquoise Powercolor pigments
Bird box created using bronze Powertex and a rainbow of Powercolor pigments
Feeling grey? Using Lead grey Powertex Fabric Hardener by Abigail Lagden
Business card holder created for ‘The Ugly Duckling’ using lead Powertex with lilac and ultramarine blue Powercolor pigments
Custom made business card holder made using black Powertex with red and burgundy Powercolor pigments

See more uses of bronze and lead Powertex in my previous articles. I used Bronze Powertex for my Steampunk Top Hat and lead Powertex for my Storage Caddy.

What are you favourite colour combinations? Let us know in the comments.

Curiously Contrary

Many of my creations are available to purchase and I also make customised pieces and take commissions. If you’d like to see where in the north east of England I’ll be with my creations over the summer, pop across to my Curiously Contrary website or facebook page.

Until next time, Abs xx

(Please note that the images I have shared in this article are of my own designs and are there to illustrate my points around colour. Please respect the time and creativity that goes into generating original designs by not recreating these pieces for sale or for other commercial purposes. If my designs inspire you to create something similar, that is fantastic, and if you are sharing them online, it would be lovely if you would acknowledge my designs (and the Powertex Magazine) as your source of inspiration.)

Powertex Steampunk Flying Machine

The Secret Art Box June 2019

Designer: Abigail Lagden

Powertex steampunk flying machine by Abigail Lagden
Steampunk Flying Machine by Abigail Lagden

There is nothing better than getting a surprise parcel is the post – especially when it is full of Powertex goodies. So I was super excited to receive and have the chance to play with June’s Secret Art Box. The box didn’t disappoint as you can see from my Powertex steampunk flying machine!

This month’s theme is steampunk and as many of you will know, I am a regular at the Whitby Steampunk Weekends, so this was the perfect kit for me.

Powertex UK Secret Art Ox Subscription box contents June 2019
Secret Art Box June 2019

The first thing that struck me was just how much was in the kit, here are the contents in and out of the box. If you have been getting these each month, you will be building up a pretty good stash of products, embellishments and reusables like the moulds and stamp.

In case this is your first box or even your first foray into Powertex, I wanted to create a project that could be completed with very little extras than the contents of the box. So here is my Powertex Steampunk Flying Machine.

Materials used from June’s Secret Art Box:

Additional materials used:

  • Foil
  • Masking tape
  • Cotton fabric
  • A zip
  • Wallpaper
  • Jute string
  • Air drying clay (or Stone Art clay)

How to create your Steampunk Flying Machine

Step 1

To turn the flat MDF balloon into something three dimensional, scrunch up pieces of tin foil to form the sides of a rough balloon shape. Cover the foil shapes in masking tape to give a better surface for the Powertex to adhere to and cut a piece of textured wallpaper to fit in the gap in the middle of the foil.

Adding dimension to mdf with foil
Step 1

Step 2

Paint the front of the MDF balloon shape with yellow Powertex. Use the yellow Powertex to stick the wallpaper and MDF wings in place and then paint the top surfaces. Attach and paint the foil shapes and the cogs using yellow Powertex.

Using Yellow Powertex Universal Medium
Step 2

Step 3

Coat the zip with Powertex and position in the middle of the balloon with the sides of the zip sitting on the foil shapes on either side. Then use strips of cotton fabric coated in Powertex to cover the foil shapes and create some ruffled texture.

Also cut the grey cord into pieces, coat with powertex and lay onto the basket element of the balloon. Mould a switch using one of the switch moulds and affix to basket. (I used some stone art clay I had laying about, but you can use any air drying clay).

Adding embellishments and textures with Powertex
Step 3

Step 4

Spray the whole piece with Mahogany Bister spray.

Using Mahogany Bister spray for colour
Step 4

Step 5

Once the bister has had a chance to dry a little, use a damp sponge to clean some of it back off the upper surfaces of the fabric.

Highlight textures by wiping away Bister
Step 5

Step 6

Time to add highlights and pigments. Use a little bit of the yellow Powertex to dry brush over the fabric to add highlights. Use the Black Magic and Silver pigments mixed with the easy varnish to colour the cogs and the teeth of the zip.

Adding metallic pigments
Step 6

The last thing is to attach the basket to the balloon of my flying machine using some jute string.

Powertex Steampunk Flying Machine by Abigail Lagden
Powertex steampunk flying machine

A little extra Powertex steampunk bonus…

As I had so much left from the kit, I couldn’t help having a little play with some of the other bits and created this little piece.

Powertex steampunk heart by Abigail Lagden

Here I used some Stone Art to make a clay with the yellow Powertex and pressed this onto an MDF heart template. I used the clock stamp and one of the small wooden angel wings to impress designs into the clay.

I added parts of the large MDF clockfaces, the rest of the cogs and a stone art clay switch using the yellow Powertex before spraying it all with the mahogany bister. Once dry I cleaned back the bister and highlighted with copper, bronze gold, rich gold and silver colortricx pigments.

And I’ve still got all this left, along with around three quarters of the Powertex, Bister and Easy varnish, plus loads of the two pigments! What shall I create next?

Pieces left from Powertex UK Steampunk Secret Art Box after 2 projects

I hope you’ve enjoyed my projects and hopefully been inspired to get creating yourself. If you’ve got this month’s Secret Art Box, have fun. We’d love to see what you’ve created with it – please come and share your work in the Powertex Studio Facebook group.

If you’d like a surprise package full of Powertex goodies, check out the subscription options for The Secret Art Box here.

Thank you for reading my article. To see more of my creations to you can visit my Curiously Contrary facebook page, instagram or website.

If you’re a fan of a bit of steampunk, you can read about my Steampunk Top Hat, here (you’ll see I like my zips and cogs!).

Or why not come and visit me at the next Whitby Steampunk Weekend – Friday 26th – Sunday 28th July. Everyone is welcome, including those who are just a little bit steam curious…

Until next time, Abs xx

Powertex Moulds

Fossil Mixed Media canvas art by Anna Emelia Howlett

In May the Product of the Month is silicon moulds. Powertex UK have a range of highly detailed silicon moulds for adding dimension to your mixed media art and crafts. Use with a Powertex and Stone Art mix for easy air drying clay. From tiny ammonite fossils, to flowers and leaves to extra large egyptian heads, take a look at the full range here. Don’t forget, when used with Powertex or Easy Varnish your pieces are also weatherproof and suitable for outdoor projects!

Powertex UK Fossil Ammonite mould

The Design Team using Powertex Moulds

Here are some examples of work using Powertex UK moulds by the design team.

Mixed media canvas with fossil ammonite mould and textures by Anna Howlett
Mixed media canvas with ammonites by Anna Emelia Howlett
Mixed media canvas with fossil ammonite mould and textures by Anna Howlett
Textured fossil canvas by Anna Emelia Howlett
Layered flower and leaves from Powertex UK moulds by Annette Smyth
Layered flowers and leaves sculpture by Annette Smyth
MDF plaque with Powertex and embellishments by Annette Smyth
Powertex plaque with flower embellishments by Annette Smyth
Mirror frame with Powertex and fossil ammonite embellishments by Donna Mcghie
Mirror frame with fossil detail by Donna Mcghie
Wonderland inspired mdf Powertex project by Donna Mcghie
Stone Art flower details by Donna Mcghie
Seascape with Stone Art Clay ammonite fossils by Jinny Holt
Seascape with Stone Art ammonites by Jinny Holt
Bottle vase with Stone Art embellishments by Jinny Holt
Curved bottle vase with Stone Art clay flowers by Jinny Holt
Ocean inspired journal with fossil ammonites from Stone Art Clay by Shell North
Journal cover with ammonite fossils from Stone Art clay by Shell North
Decorated picture frame with Powertex stone art clay flowers by Shell North
Picture frame with flower details in Stone Art clay by Shell North

Using moulds is a lovely way to use embellishments in your project. Because you have the mould you can make as few or as many pieces as you need and you can apply them while soft to curve around your surface like on Jinny’s bottle. You can also change the colour easily and Stone Art clay is very easy to work with.

If you like the look of the flower moulds you might want to take a look at this beautiful flower girl project by Anne. You can find the whole range of Powertex UK moulds here. Don’t forget to pick up some Stone Art while your there!

Powertex Flower lady with flower detail by Anne Waller
Detail of Flower Girl by Anne Waller