Leo the Powertex Lion

Designer – Abigail Lagden

Every now and then I have to grudgingly accept that a brush has gone past it’s usable life as a brush. The clue is usually when only the top 2mm of the bristles bend! However, I hate to throw things away, so I have almost three years worth of dud brushes hoarded away, awaiting a purpose. Well, that purpose has finally arrived and here is Leo the Lion to give a few of them a new life.

Leo the Lion

One of my favourite animals has to be the beautiful and majestic lion. Not really very surprising as my star sign is Leo. So when I was asked to create an animal sculpture using recycled materials, it just had to be a lion using my dud brushes.

Leo the Powertex lion by Abigail Lagden.
Leo the Powertex Lion by Abigail Lagden

Materials List

Step by Step Guide

Remove the brush heads

Firstly, I removed the brush heads from the 14 old brushes (tip: soaking in boiling water will help loosen the adhesive).

Removing the brush heads
Step 1

Arrange the brush heads

The brush heads were then arranged in a sunburst to created the outline of the lion’s mane.

Create the mane with brush heads
Step 2

Stone Art clay

I mixed stone art with bronze Powertex universal medium to form a clay and used this to hold the brush head arrangement together.

Use Powertex Stone Art clay to hold the brush heads together.
Step 3

Sculpt the face

I then built up the central area using some tin foil before sculpting the face of my lion over the top with the bronze stone art clay.

Sculpt the face
Step 4

Create the mane

To create the lion’s mane, I used pieces of powercotton soaked in bronze Powertex universal medium. For the whiskers I used some of the bristles from the brushes.

Add Powertex Powercotton mane
Step 5

Dry brushing

Finally, I applied copper, bronze gold and rich gold Colortricx pigments mixed with easy varnish.

Dry brush technique to paint metallic pigments onto the lion.
Step 6

I hope you have enjoyed seeing how I created my Leo and that you are inspired to get creating your own project. Please do share any of your makes with us over in the Powertex Studio Facebook group.

If you like astrology themed projects, why not visit Shell’s article about how she made her stunning taurus inspired headdress.

You can also see more of what I’ve been creating and information about my workshops on my website and my Curiously Contrary facebook page.

Until next time, Abs xx

Powertex Easy 3D Flex

Product of the Month for July 2019

Easy 3D comes as a heavy powder that is mixed with Powertex Fabric Hardener to create a clay. The clay is like dough and can be applied to canvas art as well as sculpture. It’s designed to crack as it dries which can leave deep cracked textures in the surface.

If you would like to try some Easy 3D Flex for yourself you can find it at Powertex UK. Need a little help to make up the clay? Just go to the instruction sheet at the bottom.

Powertex Design Team examples

The Design Team love to use this clay. Here’s some examples of how they’ve used it in their creations.

Sheep sculpture with Easy 3D Flex by Annette Smyth
Sculpture by Annette Smyth
Powertex Mixed media canvas by Anna Emelia Howlett
Mixed media canvas by Anna Emelia Howlett
Soul Sister sculpture with Powertex Easy 3D Flex by Donna Mcghie
Soul sister by Donna Mcghie

This planet art project by Jill has a tutorial in the Magazine, click on the image to open.

Powertex planet with Easy 3D Flex by Jill Cullum
Planet art by Jill Cullum
Canvas art by Fiona Potter Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Canvas art by Fiona Potter
Luxury egg by Jinny Holt with Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Mixed media egg by Jinny Holt

Shell’s beautiful Mandala art also has a tutorial, click on the image to see her step by step blog.

Mandala wall art by Shell North Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Mandala art by Shell North

This art doll kit is highly textured. You can see how Abigail puts this together in her tutorial, click on the image.

Powertex Art doll by Abigail Lagden
Art doll by Abigail Lagden
Canvas art by Kore Sage with Powertex textures
Canvas by Kore Sage

Find other project tutorials in this online magazine, just use the search bar to look for Easy 3D Flex in the categories.

Head over to Powertex Addicts United and join our community group, The Powertex Studio, share your creations. If you have a creation using Easy 3D clay, we’d love to see your makes.

If these projects have inspired you to try, you can get your own Easy 3D Flex at Powertex UK. Don’t forget you can use all your Powertex pigments, inks, paints and bister to colour these textures.

Here’s how to use Powertex Easy 3D Flex

If you’d like to mix your own Easy 3D clay but can’t get to a tutor, this will help you out.

Powertex Easy 3D Flex instruction sheet Powertex UK Easy3Dflex
How to use Powertex Easy 3D Flex

Feeling Grey? It’s not a bad thing with Powertex.

Feeling grey? Using Lead grey Powertex Fabric hardener by Abigail Lagden

Feeling grey? One of the things that people often comment on when they see my creations, is the colours. Words such as rich, deep, bright and vibrant are common.

Therefore, they are often surprised to hear that almost all of them are made with either the bronze (brown) or the lead (grey) Powertex universal medium as the base colour.

Why Bronze & Lead for the Base Colour?

1. Final Colour Considerations

Bronze and lead are both neutral colours and therefore will look good when dry brushed using any of the powercolor pigments. In fact they are perfect for my signature rainbow colours created using Powercolor pigments!

Rainbox fairy house by Curiously Contrary
Rainbow fairy house with bronze base

If you start with a bold base colour such as red, blue, green, etc you have already limited what colours will work well on top and the final pieces can look a bit ‘flat’ and lacking in depth.

Fabric sculpted bottles by Curiously Contrary
The bottle on the left has green Powertex as the base colour, the middle bottle has black and the bottle on the right has a terracotta base. I think the middle bottle appears to have much more depth than the other two which look a little ‘flat’.

2. Depth vs Brightness

The thing I love most about fabric sculpting is the textures and depth that can be created. To create the illusion of greater depth, the colours within the folds of the fabric should be as dark compared to the top of the folds.

Therefore black and bronze Powertex will give you the appearance of greater depth. My preference is bronze as I like the warmth that it creates.

Rainbow dragon treasure chest by Abigail Lagden
This dragon’s treasure chest uses a bronze base colour, creating lots of depth.

Feeling grey?

To achieve a slightly lighter/brighter feel I use the lead Powertex. Whilst it loses just a little of the depth that bronze creates, the lighter base colour lifts the overall brightness of the piece.

Sea themed treasure chest by Curiously Contrary using Lead Grey Powertex Fabric Hardener
This sea-themed treasure chest has a lead base colour giving it a lighter, brighter feel.

Here are a few more of my creations to demonstrate the colours that can be achieved using black, bronze and grey Powertex with powercolor pigments :

Blue bird box by Curiously Contrary
Bird box created using lead Powertex with ultramarine blue and turquoise Powercolor pigments
Bird box created using bronze Powertex and a rainbow of Powercolor pigments
Feeling grey? Using Lead grey Powertex Fabric Hardener by Abigail Lagden
Business card holder created for ‘The Ugly Duckling’ using lead Powertex with lilac and ultramarine blue Powercolor pigments
Custom made business card holder made using black Powertex with red and burgundy Powercolor pigments

See more uses of bronze and lead Powertex in my previous articles. I used Bronze Powertex for my Steampunk Top Hat and lead Powertex for my Storage Caddy.

What are you favourite colour combinations? Let us know in the comments.

Curiously Contrary

Many of my creations are available to purchase and I also make customised pieces and take commissions. If you’d like to see where in the north east of England I’ll be with my creations over the summer, pop across to my Curiously Contrary website or facebook page.

Until next time, Abs xx

(Please note that the images I have shared in this article are of my own designs and are there to illustrate my points around colour. Please respect the time and creativity that goes into generating original designs by not recreating these pieces for sale or for other commercial purposes. If my designs inspire you to create something similar, that is fantastic, and if you are sharing them online, it would be lovely if you would acknowledge my designs (and the Powertex Magazine) as your source of inspiration.)

Powertex Steampunk Flying Machine

The Secret Art Box June 2019

Designer: Abigail Lagden

Powertex steampunk flying machine by Abigail Lagden
Steampunk Flying Machine by Abigail Lagden

There is nothing better than getting a surprise parcel is the post – especially when it is full of Powertex goodies. So I was super excited to receive and have the chance to play with June’s Secret Art Box. The box didn’t disappoint as you can see from my Powertex steampunk flying machine!

This month’s theme is steampunk and as many of you will know, I am a regular at the Whitby Steampunk Weekends, so this was the perfect kit for me.

Powertex UK Secret Art Ox Subscription box contents June 2019
Secret Art Box June 2019

The first thing that struck me was just how much was in the kit, here are the contents in and out of the box. If you have been getting these each month, you will be building up a pretty good stash of products, embellishments and reusables like the moulds and stamp.

In case this is your first box or even your first foray into Powertex, I wanted to create a project that could be completed with very little extras than the contents of the box. So here is my Powertex Steampunk Flying Machine.

Materials used from June’s Secret Art Box:

Additional materials used:

  • Foil
  • Masking tape
  • Cotton fabric
  • A zip
  • Wallpaper
  • Jute string
  • Air drying clay (or Stone Art clay)

How to create your Steampunk Flying Machine

Step 1

To turn the flat MDF balloon into something three dimensional, scrunch up pieces of tin foil to form the sides of a rough balloon shape. Cover the foil shapes in masking tape to give a better surface for the Powertex to adhere to and cut a piece of textured wallpaper to fit in the gap in the middle of the foil.

Adding dimension to mdf with foil
Step 1

Step 2

Paint the front of the MDF balloon shape with yellow Powertex. Use the yellow Powertex to stick the wallpaper and MDF wings in place and then paint the top surfaces. Attach and paint the foil shapes and the cogs using yellow Powertex.

Using Yellow Powertex Universal Medium
Step 2

Step 3

Coat the zip with Powertex and position in the middle of the balloon with the sides of the zip sitting on the foil shapes on either side. Then use strips of cotton fabric coated in Powertex to cover the foil shapes and create some ruffled texture.

Also cut the grey cord into pieces, coat with powertex and lay onto the basket element of the balloon. Mould a switch using one of the switch moulds and affix to basket. (I used some stone art clay I had laying about, but you can use any air drying clay).

Adding embellishments and textures with Powertex
Step 3

Step 4

Spray the whole piece with Mahogany Bister spray.

Using Mahogany Bister spray for colour
Step 4

Step 5

Once the bister has had a chance to dry a little, use a damp sponge to clean some of it back off the upper surfaces of the fabric.

Highlight textures by wiping away Bister
Step 5

Step 6

Time to add highlights and pigments. Use a little bit of the yellow Powertex to dry brush over the fabric to add highlights. Use the Black Magic and Silver pigments mixed with the easy varnish to colour the cogs and the teeth of the zip.

Adding metallic pigments
Step 6

The last thing is to attach the basket to the balloon of my flying machine using some jute string.

Powertex Steampunk Flying Machine by Abigail Lagden
Powertex steampunk flying machine

A little extra Powertex steampunk bonus…

As I had so much left from the kit, I couldn’t help having a little play with some of the other bits and created this little piece.

Powertex steampunk heart by Abigail Lagden

Here I used some Stone Art to make a clay with the yellow Powertex and pressed this onto an MDF heart template. I used the clock stamp and one of the small wooden angel wings to impress designs into the clay.

I added parts of the large MDF clockfaces, the rest of the cogs and a stone art clay switch using the yellow Powertex before spraying it all with the mahogany bister. Once dry I cleaned back the bister and highlighted with copper, bronze gold, rich gold and silver colortricx pigments.

And I’ve still got all this left, along with around three quarters of the Powertex, Bister and Easy varnish, plus loads of the two pigments! What shall I create next?

Pieces left from Powertex UK Steampunk Secret Art Box after 2 projects

I hope you’ve enjoyed my projects and hopefully been inspired to get creating yourself. If you’ve got this month’s Secret Art Box, have fun. We’d love to see what you’ve created with it – please come and share your work in the Powertex Studio Facebook group.

If you’d like a surprise package full of Powertex goodies, check out the subscription options for The Secret Art Box here.

Thank you for reading my article. To see more of my creations to you can visit my Curiously Contrary facebook page, instagram or website.

If you’re a fan of a bit of steampunk, you can read about my Steampunk Top Hat, here (you’ll see I like my zips and cogs!).

Or why not come and visit me at the next Whitby Steampunk Weekend – Friday 26th – Sunday 28th July. Everyone is welcome, including those who are just a little bit steam curious…

Until next time, Abs xx

Powertex Moulds

Fossil Mixed Media canvas art by Anna Emelia Howlett

In May the Product of the Month is silicon moulds. Powertex UK have a range of highly detailed silicon moulds for adding dimension to your mixed media art and crafts. Use with a Powertex and Stone Art mix for easy air drying clay. From tiny ammonite fossils, to flowers and leaves to extra large egyptian heads, take a look at the full range here. Don’t forget, when used with Powertex or Easy Varnish your pieces are also weatherproof and suitable for outdoor projects!

Powertex UK Fossil Ammonite mould

The Design Team using Powertex Moulds

Here are some examples of work using Powertex UK moulds by the design team.

Mixed media canvas with fossil ammonite mould and textures by Anna Howlett
Mixed media canvas with ammonites by Anna Emelia Howlett
Mixed media canvas with fossil ammonite mould and textures by Anna Howlett
Textured fossil canvas by Anna Emelia Howlett
Layered flower and leaves from Powertex UK moulds by Annette Smyth
Layered flowers and leaves sculpture by Annette Smyth
MDF plaque with Powertex and embellishments by Annette Smyth
Powertex plaque with flower embellishments by Annette Smyth
Mirror frame with Powertex and fossil ammonite embellishments by Donna Mcghie
Mirror frame with fossil detail by Donna Mcghie
Wonderland inspired mdf Powertex project by Donna Mcghie
Stone Art flower details by Donna Mcghie
Seascape with Stone Art Clay ammonite fossils by Jinny Holt
Seascape with Stone Art ammonites by Jinny Holt
Bottle vase with Stone Art embellishments by Jinny Holt
Curved bottle vase with Stone Art clay flowers by Jinny Holt
Ocean inspired journal with fossil ammonites from Stone Art Clay by Shell North
Journal cover with ammonite fossils from Stone Art clay by Shell North
Decorated picture frame with Powertex stone art clay flowers by Shell North
Picture frame with flower details in Stone Art clay by Shell North

Using moulds is a lovely way to use embellishments in your project. Because you have the mould you can make as few or as many pieces as you need and you can apply them while soft to curve around your surface like on Jinny’s bottle. You can also change the colour easily and Stone Art clay is very easy to work with.

If you like the look of the flower moulds you might want to take a look at this beautiful flower girl project by Anne. You can find the whole range of Powertex UK moulds here. Don’t forget to pick up some Stone Art while your there!

Powertex Flower lady with flower detail by Anne Waller
Detail of Flower Girl by Anne Waller

Pirate’s Powertex Treasure Chest

Designer: Abigail Lagden

Treasure Chest by Abigail Lagden

Whenever I think of the open sea and what might be underneath, it always conjures up stories of pirates, shipwrecks and treasure. So for this month’s article I wanted to share a project to create a Pirate’s Powertex Treasure Chest, bursting with gold, coins and jewels. To give it a personal touch and a bit of bling, I used ‘jewels’ rescued from some broken jewellery which I think gives it some extra sparkle.

Materials Used:

How to create a Pirate’s Powertex Treasure Chest

Step 1: Paint the wooden box all over with bronze Powertex. Add some details using die cut shapes and metal embellishments and some straps using fabric.

Treasure Chest by Abigail Lagden

Step 2: Before adding the contents, scrunch up a piece tin foil to use to fill about two thirds of the chest. Covered with a piece of fabric coated in bronze Powertex. Add a piece of netting over the corner of the box.

Top tip: Work on a plastic surface. Powertex will not stick to plastic, I worked on a piece of laminated paper so that I could peel the finished piece off to add it cleanly to the base.

Step 3: I filled my treasure chest by coating 1p coins and medium 3D balls with bronze Powertex and placing them over the fabric. Fragments of abalone shell were added for magical iridescence.

Treasure Chest by Abigail Lagden

Step 4: Dry brush chest with bronze gold colortricx pigment. Rich gold colortricx pigment to colour the contents. To give some iridescence, I also added touches of the following pearl pigments to the contents – violet valentine, green ginger, sherbet dip and pink flamingo.

Treasure Chest by Abigail Lagden

Step 5: Once all of the pigments had been applied, I then used transparent Powertex to stick the ‘jewels’ into the chest.

Step 6: Create an interesting base by coating a wooden disc with a good layer of ivory Powertex. Sprinkle on some small 3D balls and whilst wet, spray with blue bister. Use a hairdryer over the top to create a cracked effect.

The last thing to do was to affix the treasure chest the base using transparent universal medium.

Pirate Treasure Chest by Abigail Lagden

I hope you’ve enjoyed my article and have been inspired to get creating a Pirate’s Powertex Treasure Chest. Don’t forget to share your makes with us all in the Powertex Studio Facebook group.

If you’d like to see more of my creations, please visit my website or my Curiously Contrary facebook page.

If you missed my last article on how to make a bright canvas full of textures, you can find it here.

Until next time, Abs xx

Summer Bright Powertex Canvas

Designer: Abigail Lagden

Create a summer bright powertex canvas

To celebrate the clocks going forward, and the lengthening days, I wanted to create something bright and colourful. So this summer bright powertex canvas uses the gorgeous Secret Art Loft acrylic paints to add some fabulous colour and also incorporates some clock elements.

However, when I came to design and create my project I was half way through the Open Studio event and the vast majority of my art materials were at the event location and not at home where I needed them. So, this project was also a lesson in making the best of what you have available.

People are often surprised to see the journey that my pieces take and how much they can change from start to finish, and this project is no exception. Who’d have thought it started out black?

Materials Used:

Top tip: As most of my students will know, I really don’t like flat surfaces in my work, so my first thought was to stencil some texture onto the canvas as a base. However, my easy structure paste was at my open studio so I needed to improvise. Rather than turn to wallpaper, I raided my stash of die cut card shapes instead…

How the canvas was created

Step one:

Paint the canvas with black Powertex, position the die cut shapes onto the canvas and paint over with the black Powertex.

Step two:

Add the wooden numbers and MDF shapes and paint over with black Powertex

Step three:

Mix Easy 3D Flex with white Powertex to make a thick paste and apply thickly to the corners and more thinly across other areas. Leave to crack.

Step four:

To give the project a good base for the acrylic paints, paint the black areas with the white Powertex and allow to dry.

Step five:

Add the Secret Art Loft acrylic paints using a sponge. Build up the colours, layering them to get a blended effect.

Step six:

Dry the acrylic paint before gently dry brushing highlights using white Powertex to make all the textures pop.

summer bright powertex canvas

To help the numbers stand out a little more, I gave them a little coat of colortricx rich gold pigment mixed with easy varnish.

summer bright powertex canvas
summer bright powertex canvas
summer bright powertex canvas

I hope this summer bright powertex canvas has brought some colour to your day. Don’t forget to share your makes with us all in the Powertex Studio Facebook group.

If you’d like to see more of my creations, please visit my website or my Curiously Contrary facebook page.

If you missed my last article on how to make a pretty hanging heart plaque, you can find it here.

Until next time, Abs xx

Pretty Powertex Hanging Heart

Pretty Powertex Hanging Heart by Abigail Lagden

Pretty Powertex Hanging Heart by Abigail Lagden

It’s lovely to start seeing the signs of spring outside, so this month I have been inspired to share a nice pretty piece inspired by flowers, with a touch of belated Valentine’s romance. So you will know how to make your own pretty Powertex hanging heart.

It is a nice a simple project, using basic techniques, that I hope anyone will feel they can attempt.

To complete this project I used the following:

I started by mixing the different coloured Powertex together. I wanted a pale purple so I mixed the red and blue together first and then slowly added some white to lighten it. You can achieve almost any colour by mixing the different colours – just make sure you mix enough for your project as it can be difficult to get the exact same colour twice. You can also store any leftovers in an airtight container to use on another project. Also remember that it will always dry a shade or two darker than it appears when wet.

Red and blue mixed
With white added

I then drew around the heart onto some wallpaper embossed with leaves and cut it out. I used my purple Powertex like a glue to attach the cut out wallpaper heart to the MDF heart, before painting it over the front of the wallpaper.

I coated some pieces of cotton lace with the purple Powertex and added them to the heart. I always recommend cutting the lace longer than you need as it has a habit of shrinking when it gets coated. The ends can then be trimmed off with scissors.

I coated a piece of t-shirt fabric and some ruffled lace and arranged them down one side of the heart before coating and arranging various metal filigree embellishments down the other side. Finally I added metal leaves and three mulberry paper flowers onto the fabric, all coated with my purple Powertex.

This little project didn’t use very much purple Powertex at all, maybe just 50ml total. So I have plenty left over and another perfect project in mind already.

The heart was left to dry before dry brushing with lilac, orange, yellow and white powercolor pigments mixed with varnish. Once coloured I finished it off with a piece of lilac ribbon through the holes to hang it from.

Pretty Powertex Hanging Heart by Abigail Lagden
Pretty Powertex Hanging Heart by Abigail Lagden
Pretty Powertex Hanging Heart by Abigail Lagden

I hope you have enjoyed this simple little project and that it may just inspire you to crack open your bottle of Powertex. We’d love to see what you create so please do share your makes in our Powertex Studio facebook group.

If you’d like to see more of my creations, please pop over to my Curiously Contrary facebook page or visit my website www.curiously-contrary.co.uk

Did you catch my article last month? If not why not pop over and take a look here.

Until next time, Abs xx

Powertex Medium Art Doll

mixed media powertex medium art doll tutorial

Powertex Medium Art doll – Goddess of Mystery – by Abigail Lagden

Hello and welcome to my latest project! For this one I have used the Powertex medium Art Doll kit with the contents shown below.

Kit contents

I love working with the project kits from Powertex UK. They provide the perfect level of structure to work with and stimulate ideas. But also have the flexibility to put your own style into them. By how you construct them, which other products and embellishments you use and finally how you add colour to them.

As usual, I started by playing with the MDF kit pieces and arranging them in different ways. The picture below shows my initial guide design. As you can see it evolved and changed a fair bit as the project progressed. This always happens to some degree with my creations. So don’t worry that you have to stick rigidly to your first design. It helps to have an idea of where you are going at the start. I find the best results happen when you just go with the creative flow once you start building your piece.

Original design

As well as the Medium MDF Art Doll Kit, I used the following for this project:

First I used Easy Structure through the ‘arty quotes’ stencil to add the words ‘mystery’ and ‘wonder’ to the wings. The thing I love about this stencil is that not only do you have the lovely quotes in their entirety. But you can also just use specific words or phrases from within the quotes. To keep the stencilling clean for single words, I use masking tape to cover the words. Placing around the ones that I want to use before using Easy Structure paste through it.

Stencil masking

I wanted there to be lots of texture in this project. I mixed three different pastes using yellow Powertex with Easy 3D Flex, 3D sand/small balls and Stone Art.

Three pastes

First, I covered the base of the shadow box with the Easy 3D Flex paste. Before using yellow Powertex to attach and paint the sides of the box. I applied the sand and balls paste to the ‘crown’ pieces and pushed them into the 3D flex paste. Then I painted the plaster face with yellow Powertex. Pushed it into the 3D flex paste and sprinkled a few small balls into the box.

Box frame

Next, I worked on the back piece of MDF. Randomly adding areas of the three different pastes I mixed earlier. Creating lots of textures and submerging the MDF row of hooks at the bottom. Then I sprinkled some medium 3D balls onto a few areas followed by some small balls to fill the gaps. Whilst the background piece was still wet, I attached the box frame and the other MDF shape into the pastes.

I smeared a little left over 3D Flex paste onto the princess’ face and onto parts of the crown piece.

Pre-bister

The top piece of the shadow box was painted just with yellow Powertex. The wings were covered with the sand and balls paste.

Wings 1

All of the pieces were then left to dry and/or crack before they were sprayed with brown bister.

Bistered piece

Bistered bits

This was dried and then the bister cleaned back using a damp sponge. Leaving the stronger colour in the depressions, giving more depth to the textures and lightening the uppermost parts.

Cleaned back bister

Cleaned back bister wings

Now for the fun part… adding a little bit of extra colour to bring the piece to life. I wanted this piece to have quite an earthy, rustic, natural quality. I used different blends of light blue, moss green, yellow ochre, lilac and white powercolor pigments. Mixed with easy varnish and applied using a dry brush technique.

Close up 2

Close up 1

The final step was to secure the wings to the front of the frame with powertex. Then the front of the frame to the main piece. I also hung a little metal key charm through the hole at the bottom of the frame.

Close up 3

Powertex Princess Art Doll - Abigail Lagden

I hope you’ve enjoyed seeing how I made this piece. Please do share your own creations on the Powertex Studio facebook page. Where you will find lots of inspiration as well as support from our fabulous Powertexing community.

You can also see more of my work on my Curiously Contrary facebook page and on my website. If you didn’t catch my blog last month take a look here.

Until next time, Abs xx

Powertex Stone Art Clay Pendant – Abigail Lagden

Powertex Stone Art jewellery pendant

Well, Happy New Year and I hope you had a lovely Christmas.

For my first blog of 2019 I thought I would take a festive left over and re-purpose it into something fun and funky for the new year.

So for this project, I started with an MDF bauble shape, some red Powertex, Stone Art, macrame cord and some texture mats.

Starting point

I began by mixing some stone art clay using the red Powertex and the Stone Art. When mixing small amounts of stone art clay I pour a little Powertex into a yogurt pot, then using an old paintbrush handle, I gradually mix in small handfuls of stone art. I keep adding stone art until the mixture thickens up and starts to pull away quite cleanly from the sides of the pot rather like a dough. It can then be turned out and a little more stone art worked in by hand to get a  consistency a little like polymer clay.

Part mixed clay
Part-mixed clay

Mixed clay
Clay ready to turn out

Once the clay was the right consistency, I rolled it out using an acrylic rolling pin to a thickness of approximately 3mm and a little larger than the size of the bauble. Then I positioned one of the texture mats on top and rolled the rolling pin over the top to impress the pattern into the clay.

Next I placed the bauble on top of the impressed clay and carefully cut around the edge using a craft knife to make a perfect circle of clay.

Bauble cut clay

I have recently acquired some macrame cord and love the simple texture of it when rolled into a coil, so I wanted to incorporate this into my project. To make it sit within the clay I needed to cut a circle out of it, so I used the lid of a fabric conditioner bottle like a pastry cutter to remove a circle of the clay.

Cut out circle

To attach the clay, I painted the bauble with Powertex before placing the clay on top.

Macrame cord was then coated in red Powertex and coiled to fit in the circular hole and also to create a border around the edge. The piece was then left to dry overnight.

Macrame cord added

Once dry, I sprayed brown bister over the clay to enhance the impressed texture and once this was dry I gently used a damp sponge to remove the bister from the uppermost surfaces and reveal the red colour again.

Bistered
Sprayed with brown bister

Cleaned Bister
Bister wiped back

Finally, I added colour by mixing Powerwax with yellow ochre, orange and moss green powercolor pigments and applying with a sponge.

The last step was to add a piece of ribbon through the hanging hole to make this piece into a beautiful wearable pendant.

Pendant

Pendant on driftwood

I hope you have enjoyed this project and you have been inspired to get creative this year. Please do share your makes with us through the Powertex Studio facebook group and let others know about the Powertex blog and the fabulous inspiration you can find here.

You can see more of my curious creations and the Powertex workshops I am running in County Durham, by popping by my Curiously Contrary facebook page or my website.

Until next time, here’s to an awesome 2019,

Abs xx