Festive Powertex decorations

If you love to make seasonal decorations then this article is for you! From tree decorations to door wreaths, we’ve got ideas for your Powertex festive decorations.

Patricia Williams Powertex Wreath
Powertex Wreath by Alex Henry Mixed Media

Supply ideas for your festive decorations

Jacqueline Frances Butler Powertex Wreath
Wreath by Isalei Craft

TOP TIP: If you’d like to create something for outside like a door wreath, use Powertex Universal Medium. Remember your makes will need 3 weeks curing time before they are weatherproof.

Michele Brewer Christmas Reindeer Powertex Decorations
Reindeer by Creative Power UK

Try MDF, card or polystyrene shapes as a base

Use Powertex Universal Medium to coat fabric and embellishments to decorate an mdf or polystyrene shape or cardboard gift boxes. Create trees, baubles, wreaths and more.

Karen Hewitt Christmas Baubles Powertex
Tree baubles by Inky Escapades
Christmas tree by Jinny Holt Powertex
Christmas tree by Mums Shed
Christmas tree by LoveKnott Creations
Irene Snow globe Powertex
Snow globes by Purrfect Crafting

Festive sculptures

Donna Mcghie Three KIngs Powertex
Three kings by Donna Mcghie
Powertex clay penguins Donna Mcghie
Powertex clay penguins by Donna Mcghie
Rachel Pullen Powertex Christmas Santa Gnomes
Christmas gnomes by CraftmyDay

Crack open the Red Powertex for a bright base and use Gold pigments or inks for a festive finish.

Jinny has an article about making Christmas baubles and you can pop over to Facebook Powertex Addicts and join the group for more inspiration. Share your makes there too!

There are also two tutorials on offer, available on the website to get you started.

Enjoy making your Wintery creations.

Van Gogh Inspired Powertex

This article is about how my favourite artist influences what I create with Powertex. Gosh, making this choice was as tricky as choosing a design from one of my fellow Powertex design team members. The main three artists I whittled it down to were Vincent Van Gogh, Lucian Freud and Frida Kahlo. 

Vincent Van Gogh style Powertex
Swirly patterns reminiscent of Van Gogh often work their way into my art

“I want to touch people with my art. I want them to say ‘he feels deeply, he feels tenderly’.”

Vincent Van Gogh

All three have very different styles, but each of these artists work, move’s me on an emotional level. To me their work has a kinaesthetic quality to it.  I almost want to dive right into the painting and feel the textures of paint they have layered on. Obviously I hold myself back from doing this as I’m not a fan of getting thrown out of art galleries.

Van Gogh quote with Powertex art
I incorporate some of Van Gogh’s quotes into my art using the Powertex stencils

“If you hear a voice within you say ‘you cannot paint’, then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced.”

Vincent Van Gogh

Looking back on my Powertex work

When I looked back over my Powertex work, the style of Van Gogh seems to have influenced me the most. Maybe it is because the textural aspect of Powertex works so well for creating those swirling patterns of colour, that can carry add such emotional clout to an image.

paint brush incorporated into powertex journal
I added an old paint brush as it just felt like it belonged in this piece

A while back I did a step by step on how I created a Van Gogh inspired bottle, complete with starry starry lights which you can find here.

I had fun incorporating the twisted willow into this design

“The heart of man is very much like the sea, it has its storms, it has its tides and in its depths it has its pearls too.”

Vincent Van Gogh

I have also created a journal using the same techniques.

“It is with the reading of books the same as with looking at pictures; one must, without doubt, without hesitations, with assurance, admire what is beautiful.'”

Vincent Van Gogh

I stumbled across a book of Van Gogh’s letters some years ago, and was blown away by the beauty of his words. He used words just as beautifully and just as brutally honestly as he used his paint brush.

I am a doodler and a scribbler, and never keep my journals clean and tidy. They tend to get lost in the chaos of my studio, and resurface when the time is right for me to use them. But this one is precious to me. This one I never lose.

front and back of my van gogh powertex journal
The one journal I always keep safe and sound

Who inspires you?

Here at Powertex UK we love to see photos of your creations, and to find out who you have been inspired by. Please feel free to share them over on our Facebook group.

If you would like to leave any comments here, they are also very welcome. You can see more of what I get up to over on my own Facebook page.

That’s all from me for now folks, keep on Powertexing and I will see you in December.

Acrylic inks

Secret Art Loft acrylic ink sprays at Powertex UK

The spray acrylic inks add vibrant colour to your Powertex mixed media art and crafts. The inks are transparent so they can be layered and blended into each other for juicy colour.

This month there is 10% off Tracey Evans’ range of Secret Art Loft acrylic ink sprays at Powertex UK.

Take a look at these gorgeous samples using the acrylic inks, from Powertex tutors. They use Powertex Universal Medium with mdf, fabric, clay and texture mediums with the inks for stunning projects.

Annette Smyth mdf frame with cow skull, Powertex and acrylic inks
Mixed media art by Annette Smyth
Patricia Williams lighthouse Powertex triptych
Sea triptych by Patricia Williams

Use the ink sprays on figures and sculpture

Wendy Reed bright acrylic ink geisha sculpture
Geisha figure by Wendy Reed
Buddha box by Annette Smyth
Buddha box by Annette Smyth
Japanese fish Powertex sculpture by Annette Smyth
Fish sculpture by Annette Smyth

The inks are available in a range of colours including metallics

Cow skull art
Cow skull art by Kore Sage
Mermaids by Patricia Williams
Mermaids by Patricia Williams
Wall letters by Samantha Thompson

Add textures with clay, mdf and fabric

Cow skull dream catcher by Donna Mcghie with Powertex acrylic inks
Dreamcatcher by Donna Mcghie

Donna has written a step by step tutorial for her dreamcatcher art.

Shell North Powertex box with cow skull
Cow skull box by Shell North
Fi Potter tea cups
Tea set by Fi Potter
Fairy door by Kore Sage with Powertex acrylic inks
Fairy door by Kore Sage

The acrylic inks are on special offer in October with 10% off to celebrate Tracey’s birthday. The gorgeous colours available are Raspberry, Aqua, Palm, Viola, Egg yolk, Tangerine, Deep sea, Lava and Damson. There’s also 5 metallic inks in Aqua, Golden, Copper penny, Silver sixpence and Coral pearl.

Shop now to take advantage of this offer. If you have any questions about using the acrylic inks you can always head to the Powertex Studio Facebook group for advice.

Powertex Dreamcatcher

Designed by Donna Mcghie

Powertex dreamcatcher by Donna Mcghie
Step by step guide to creating a Powertex Dream Catcher

The story behind my Powertex dreamcatcher. I will always have a bit of a soft spot for dream catchers.  When my daughter was young she suffered awfully from night terrors. 

We tried many techniques to get her to have a peaceful night, and spoke to many professionals as well.  One of the things we tried,  hoping that it would help her even if just a through a placebo effect was a dream catcher. 

I’d be lying if I said she slept perfectly once we hung up her dream catcher. The thought of it catching those bad dreams and holding them at bay definitely had a calming effect on her before she closed her eyes at bedtime to go to sleep.

Thankfully those days are long behind us now, and my daughter is now a young woman.  But she has seen the dream catcher shown here and I know this is something she would still hang up in her bedroom or living room.

For this dream catcher I used the gorgeous ink sprays now available from Powertex UK.  I just love how vibrant and easy to use these are, and how they automatically blend into each other to create almost an air brushed effect. 

Materials List

How to make my Powertex dreamcatcher

Prepare the frame

Prepare the frame
This mdf frame is so easy to use


Paint the Powertex mdf frame and panel with Ivory Fabric Hardener and set aside to dry.

Mix up Stone Art clay

Mix up Stone Art Clay
I used the mould for one cow’s head, but made lots of the flowers to add onto my final design

Mix up  Stone Art with Ivory Fabric Hardener to form a clay. I  pressed this into the Cow Skull and Flowers mould.

Spray with acrylic inks

Spray with acrylic inks
I put the small raised square to one side for now and only sprayed the larger piece

I wanted to create a surreal dreamy effect, so popped out the shapes from the MDF Dream Catchers and used them as stencils, spraying over with my ink sprays randomly.

Add Easy Structure texture

Add easy structure feathers
The easy structure adds texture to the design

Put Easy Structure onto a pallet knife and smear it through a leaf stencil.  I also sponged silver acrylic onto the leaves.

Use Bister spray for depth

Use Bister sprays for depth
Bister gives added depth to the design.

I added more texture by soaking my natural paperdecoration in transparent hardener and placing around the edges. I also sprayed the edges with Mahogany Bister Spray.

Lay out Paperdecoration

Using Paperdecoration
I sprayed the cow’s head with acrylics to keep in with my colour scheme

Put together the inner section and add paperdecoration (soaked in transparent hardener) and the cow’s head. I did not glue it in just yet.

Layering paperdecoration
Once I was happy with this section, I secured it onto the larger piece.

I soaked my light pink paperdecoration in transparent fabric hardener and add this to my design also.

Mdf feathers

mdf feathers
Once the easy structure was dry I painted my feathers with Raspberry Sorbet Acrylic and also dry brushed them.

My next step was to add texture to my mdf feathers by using the Easy Structure and my feather stencil. I put them to one side to dry.

Paint and add clay flowers

Stone Art clay flowers
I used lots of these little flowers

Painted all the small flowers with Acrylic Paint and once dry, dry brush with White Powercolor.

Add crochet fabric

Create the dreamcatcher
If you are clever enough crochet your own middle, or do what I do and scour the charity shops

I soaked some crochet in the Ivory Hardener and secured it into the mdf circles. Once dry, I sprayed with my inks and added flowers

Glue the pieces together

Glue the dreamcatcher pieces together with Powertex
My mdf feathers are glued to the dream catcher to help secure the whole piece together

Glue the dream catcher into place and add feathers to the design.

Dry brushing

Powertex dream catcher with feathers by Donna Mcghie
The finished Dream Catcher

Finally I dry brushed my whole piece using the interference pigments and the white Powercolor.

Finishing Touches

The interference colours were gorgeous to use with this project, as I honestly do think they have a dreamy quality to them.  I also used a sponge to add just a touch of the aqua ink to the tips of the feathers. I felt they needed something extra to help them blend in. 

TOP TIP: I was slightly concerned about the dream catcher adhering to the square, but found by putting glue on both the top of the dream catcher, and also the larger feathers it secured on nicely.

That’s all from me for this month. If you’ve enjoyed this Powertex dreamcatcher, I would be really grateful if you popped over to check out my Facebook page as well. You can also see my last design team project that’s great for Halloween.

Until next time, keep powertexing 🙂

Becoming a Powertex tutor

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be a Powertex tutor? Our tutors come from different backgrounds and have built creative businesses that suit them, from weekend crafty meet-ups to full time, social entrepreneur. Read their stories and if you think you have what it takes to be a Powertex tutor, get in touch.

Tutor retreat Abyssimo workshop Powertex UK
Powertex UK with Abyssimo Workshop 2019

Building a dream

Abigail Lagden Powertex tutor
Abigail Lagden from Curiously Contrary

Abigail from Curiously Contrary says “Being made redundant was the push that I needed to properly consider developing my part time creative practice into a business. It has been a lot of hard work and a steep learning curve but it has also been fantastic fun and infinitely rewarding. I still have to pinch myself to make sure it isn’t all a dream and I have absolutely no plans to go back to having a ‘real job’ any time soon!”

Does this sound like your dream come true? Find out more about becoming a Powertex tutor by emailing Michele at Powertex UK.

Tutor Training

Training in the different products and techniques is available and you can succeed with hard work and supported by Powertex UK and fellow tutors. Every tutor runs their own unique workshops, allowing them to be creative with the products and offer something personal. There are now Powertex Academies across England offering tutor training too.

Supporting and encouraging others

Jaxs from Vintage Crafts by Jaxs says “I discovered Powertex and loved it straight away and I’ve been a tutor just over a year. I’m also a Slimming world consultant and a Zumba instructor. My Saturdays are free so that’s usually when I’m doing workshops. I’d say to anyone thinking about becoming a tutor, Go for it!!!! It’s that moment when your students see the finished item and their face is saying wow, it makes me think yep, I’m glad I did this.”

Do you love watching others create and succeed like Jaxs? Take a look at Powertex UK on Facebook to see what we’re about.

Giving back to the community

Donna Mcghie Powertex workshop with Donna Mcghie Art and Murals
Donna Mcghie Art and Murals

Donna from Art and Murals says “I love running Powertex workshops because they enable me to make a contribution to the Royal Papworth Hospital Charity. I call my workshops Art 4 A Heart Workshops and a part of my profits gets donated to the hospital as my way of saying thank you for giving me back my husband when he had his heart transplant.

I get the freedom of running my business as an independent business woman, with the added bonus of the support and advice from my fellow tutors and the guys at headquarters if I need it. Win win really.”

Would you like to run a socially minded creative business like Donna?

Sharing experience

Dawn Culver Powertex Tutor
Powertex tutor Dawn Culver

Dawn from Daybreak Crafts says “I have crafted for a number of years, right back to the 1980’s when I used to create cross stitched items to sell at craft fairs. One of my friends owned a well known craft company and offered me a job. Whilst I was working on a stand at the NEC, I met Tracey Evans and loved what she was demoing. I mentioned to Tracey I would be interested in becoming a tutor and did my training. I am currently in the process of selling off all my ‘clean’ crafting items as I have concluded I am not a clean crafter and much prefer mixed media type crafting.”

Are you looking to share your crafting experience like Dawn?

Getting creative and making friends

Bridget Griffiths Magic Garden Lyddle Folk, Powertex Tutor
Bridget from Magic Garden – Lyddle Folk

Bridget from Magic Garden – Lyddle Folk says “During the week I’m a meticulously tidy, organised accounts assistant. At the weekend I’m up to my elbows in Powertex letting my imagination run free and helping others to do the same. I do the workshops in my dining room with groups of 3-4 or one to ones. I’m able to do one or two a month, with the odd commission thrown in.

Most of my customers just want the chance to get out, have fun and meet others. The fact that they are so delighted by what they achieve is a bonus. Whether I do a whole day or just a half day, the workshops are always something I look forward to.”

Do you want to get creative and connect with other like minded people like Bridget?

Find out more about becoming a tutor

If you’re passionate about Powertex and would love to share it with others through your own creative business, we’d love to hear from you. Email Michele at Powertex UK if you think being a Certified Powertex Tutor is for you. You can also find us on Facebook. We’re looking forward to hearing from you.

If you’d like to see what some of our tutors are creating, browse the Design Team articles on the Powertex UK Mixed Media Magazine.

Powertex Ghoul Shoulder Accessory

Designer – Donna Mcghie

For this month’s articles the Powertex Design Team were asked to look back over the archives and put our own spin on a previous creation by one of our colleagues. What an inspiration it was going back over past Powertex sculptures and creations.  I was spoilt for choice.  However, the one creation that stopped me in my tracks was the Powertex Halloween Ghoul from October 2018, by the very talented Anna Emelia Howlett, of Rosehart Designs. 

Powertex ghoul for Halloween
A spooky little Powertex Ghoul shoulder buddy for Halloween by Donna Mcghie

I have to admit to have never having watched a Harry Potter film in my life. I was unsure what a dementor was, but I liked the challenge of doing something so outside of my comfort zone.

However, this was not to be an exact copy of Anna’s brilliant design.  My take on it was to create a smaller one, who could be worn on the shoulder to watch over me as Halloween approaches.  Whether he is friend or foe remains to be seen.

“Where there is no imagination there is no horror” So says Sherlock Holmes in Arthur Conan Doyle’s book  A Study in Scarlet.

Anyone who has ever watched a horror film with me will testify that I have a very vivid imagination.  It was still great fun creating this little Powertex dementor though

Materials List

How to make a Powertex Halloween Ghoul

Step 1

Skeleton base for Powertex skull
In Anna’s original she adapted her skull to have an open mouth. Mine was too small to do this.

I  poked some wire in the base of my skull for a neck, and then built shoulders using wire, foil and masking tape.

Step 2

powertex skull base sitting on shoulder
I placed my ghoul on the jacket shoulder to check it fitted

I added on long bony fingers with some extra wire.

Step 3

Powertex ghoul stage 4
I propped him up on a plastic container so I could work on him without it sticking

I painted him in black Powertex and added kitchen roll for texture.

Step 4

Black Powertex adds texture to the halloween ghoul
As well as material I added texture with Paperdec and string

I soaked thin cloth in Black Powertex Fabric Hardener for his cloak.

Step 5

Powertex Skull Head
Scary Face!!

I decided to enlarge his mouth and eyes by making holes with scissors.

Step 6

Final dry brushing of the Powertex ghoul
Dry brushing brings out all that texture

Finishing touches

Once my ghoul had dried I added the final touches of dry brushing, using Anna’s choice of pigments.

Getting it to sit upright on my jacket was a challenge. Initially I had planned to use velcro, but decided I didn’t want his company on a permanent basis, only on spooky nights.

I compromised by using big safety pins. As I had only used thin material I was able to push pins through his cloak, and also hook them over his bony hands. This ensured my ghoul stayed in place and looks over my shoulder as long as I want him to.

Powertex Halloween Ghoul by Donna Mcghie

I hope you have enjoyed my take on Anna’s Powertex ghoul. Any comments you wish to leave would be greatly appreciated. You can see the original ghoul over on Anna’s blog here. We’d love to see your take on a Powertex Ghoul, over on our Facebook page The Powertex Studio.

You can see more of what I get up to over on my website or my facebook page. That’s all from me for this month. Until September take care, keep on creating, and may all your ghouls be friendly ones 🙂

Powertex Giraffe

Unique Powertex giraffe garden feature

Designer – Donna Mcghie

For this article I was asked to create a 3D animal using Powertex and recycled materials.  As anyone who is familiar with Powertex will know, the possibilities for this are endless. My brain was buzzing with ideas.  However, it was when I was sorting out stuff to take to the dump, that inspiration hit for a Powertex giraffe.

Step by step blog on how to create a powertex giraffe
Follow my step by step to create a unique Powertex Giraffe for your garden

I was loading a broken floor mop into my van that I settled on what I was going to create. The mop was speaking to me, and what it was saying was one word.  Giraffe.  As I turned it round in my hands, a picture started to form in my mind.  I even had a ready made pose, with the head lifted high, as though nibbling on leaves.  Yes I thought, I’m going to make you into a giraffe’s head sticking out of a plant pot in my garden. 

A strange thing to think?  Maybe, but I’m willing to guess that anyone who is into Powertex will have had similar thoughts on a regular basis.

mop to use for giraffe
Look at that, a ready made Giraffe shape

We have a plant that overhangs our fence and I decided to turn this into a feature by placing my giraffe so that it can decoratively nibble on the leaves. I opted to only make the neck as I thought it would look quirky sticking out amongst my plants.

Materials List

Making a Powertex Giraffe Garden Feature

Create the head

mop head for giraffe
I like to recycle a lot of packaging in this way

I scrunched up old plastic from packaging and old rubber gloves to form the shape of the face, before covering tightly with masking tape.

Create the base

sand base
Sand in the base that contained the disinfectant holder gives a bit of weight to stop it being too top heavy.

I filled the part that held the disinfectant base with sand before also covering with tin foil and tape to add weight.

Create the neck

masking tape to prep the surface
Please excuse the photobombing from Logan my dog. He was very interested in what I was making

Using old plastic I padded out the shape of the neck all the way down, and bound tightly with masking tape before painting with Powertex Fabric Hardener.

Stone Art clay and horns

giraffe head with stone art clay
I used old toothbrushes for the horns, and stones for the eyes

I mixed Stone Art Clay  face and neck leaving some pole (and sand) free to bury in soil in my plant pot.

Make the eyes and ears

Top tip, leave some wire hanging over the end of the ears to dig into the clay to ensure they stay put

I molded some ear shapes using tin foil and wire, before covering with tape and clay and adhering to the head. I also pushed some stones in for the eyes.

Easy 3d Flex clay

Make 3D Flex Clay in exactly the same way you made the Stone Art Clay. Be sure to leave it somewhere warm to dry off and create crackle and texture

I dry brushed with Powertex Rich Gold Pigment before adding some Easy 3D Flex patches. A stamp added even more texture.

Fabric eyelashes

I wanted my Giraffe to have gorgeous long lashes

I used Black Powertex Fabric Hardener and some tassles from an old key ring to create luscious lashes for my Giraffe.

Use some fringing

fringing for neck
This fringing that I got from the Scrap Store was perfect for my Giraffe’s neck hair

I soaked some of this fringing in Bronze Powertex to create the hair for my giraffe’s neck, and left the whole thing to dry off completely.

Dry brushing

giraffe neck with Powertex texture
Just look at all that texture in that 3D Flex!

The finishing touches

The final step was to dry brush the whole thing in Bronze Gold Pigment. This create a contrast to the Rich Gold that was on the Clay underneath the 3D Flex patches.

I wanted to be sure that anything  I used apart from Powertex was recycled.  Hence the stones for eyes, and the toothbrushes for horns.  I had thought of using old corks for the horns, and toyed with using hessian for the patches, but my love for Easy 3D flex won
out. 

If you decide create something similar, to ensure it is weather resistant please be aware that Stone Art Clay needs to be kept indoors for 6 months initially.

Gerald will stay safely inside until next year. Just before putting him
outside I will give another couple of coats of Easy Varnish, especially on the
Easy 3D Flex patches.

Powertex giraffe by Donna Mcghie
Powertex giraffe by Donna Mcghie

Obviously if you choose to make your own Giraffe you can do it on as big, or as small a scale as you wish – using anything that is available to you at home. If you decide to make one please do post a photo over on our Facebook page as we love to see what people are inspired to create. 

If you are unsure about how to create Stone Art Clay, my fellow design team member Annette has great instructions in this blog.

Thanks so much for reading, I hope you are inspired by Gerald. You can see more of my work on my facebook page, and my website www.artandmurals.co.uk.

Until next month, take care and Happy Powertexing 🙂

Powertex Easy 3D Flex

Product of the Month for July 2019

Easy 3D comes as a heavy powder that is mixed with Powertex Fabric Hardener to create a clay. The clay is like dough and can be applied to canvas art as well as sculpture. It’s designed to crack as it dries which can leave deep cracked textures in the surface.

If you would like to try some Easy 3D Flex for yourself you can find it at Powertex UK. Need a little help to make up the clay? Just go to the instruction sheet at the bottom.

Powertex Design Team examples

The Design Team love to use this clay. Here’s some examples of how they’ve used it in their creations.

Sheep sculpture with Easy 3D Flex by Annette Smyth
Sculpture by Annette Smyth
Powertex Mixed media canvas by Anna Emelia Howlett
Mixed media canvas by Anna Emelia Howlett
Soul Sister sculpture with Powertex Easy 3D Flex by Donna Mcghie
Soul sister by Donna Mcghie

This planet art project by Jill has a tutorial in the Magazine, click on the image to open.

Powertex planet with Easy 3D Flex by Jill Cullum
Planet art by Jill Cullum
Canvas art by Fiona Potter Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Canvas art by Fiona Potter
Luxury egg by Jinny Holt with Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Mixed media egg by Jinny Holt

Shell’s beautiful Mandala art also has a tutorial, click on the image to see her step by step blog.

Mandala wall art by Shell North Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Mandala art by Shell North

This art doll kit is highly textured. You can see how Abigail puts this together in her tutorial, click on the image.

Powertex Art doll by Abigail Lagden
Art doll by Abigail Lagden
Canvas art by Kore Sage with Powertex textures
Canvas by Kore Sage

Find other project tutorials in this online magazine, just use the search bar to look for Easy 3D Flex in the categories.

Head over to Powertex Addicts United and join our community group, The Powertex Studio, share your creations. If you have a creation using Easy 3D clay, we’d love to see your makes.

If these projects have inspired you to try, you can get your own Easy 3D Flex at Powertex UK. Don’t forget you can use all your Powertex pigments, inks, paints and bister to colour these textures.

Here’s how to use Powertex Easy 3D Flex

If you’d like to mix your own Easy 3D clay but can’t get to a tutor, this will help you out.

Powertex Easy 3D Flex instruction sheet Powertex UK Easy3Dflex
How to use Powertex Easy 3D Flex

Stormy Sea Tag with Powertex

Designed by – Donna Mcghie

Powertex stormy sea tag scene using mdf tags by Donna Mcghie
Seascape tag

Tags are really popular in the crafting world at the moment. For my stormy sea tag, I’m using the A5 tag from Powertex UK. They are great quality to work with, whatever your style of crafting.

Don’t you just love the fact that we all have our own individual style?  Obviously style evolves as we experiment and learn new techniques.  My own style I would describe as rather haphazard.  I’ve never been one for over thinking a project. 

Once many years ago an art tutor declared my work to be very ‘organic’. Initially I wasn’t quite sure how to take this, but I think I know what she was getting at. As an artist I like to allow my paint, Powertex, or whatever medium I’m using to have a life of it’s own.  You could say I’m a ‘go with the flow’ kind of a girl.

Go With The Flow

What do I mean by ‘go with the flow?’ Well, according to the artist Jenny Holzer “Going with the flow is soothing but risky.” I find it soothing to allow Powertex to take on a life of it’s own. I also love the sense of risk, the excitement of never quite knowing what I will end up with.

That could be why I love stormy seascapes. How wonderful that everyone’s storm will end up slightly different.

Materials list:

1: Prepare with White Powertex

Prepare mdf with white powertex
A5 tag and lighthouse mdf

Sponge Powertex White over MDF pieces and set aside to dry.

2: Blue Bister

Powertex mdf tab with blue bister and white fabric hardener for sky
Powertex Blue Bister makes a perfect blustery sky

Spray Powertex Ready Mixed Blue Bister on the top third of the tag. Use a damp sponge wipe away spaces for the clouds.

3: Adding fabric strips

Powertex mdf lighthouse template
I set this aside to dry for a while

Soak denim strips in transparent hardener to for sections of the lighthouse and paint the top.  A blast of ready mixed black bister gives a rugged effect.

4: Pouring Powertex

powertex mdf tag with bisters and fabric hardeners for stormy waves
This was my favourite part, where I got to ‘go with the flow’

Fun Time! Pour blue fabric hardener with smidgeon of white for the wave. Whilst still wet spray with green bister and blast with dryer for movement and crackles.

5: Place the lighthouse

powertex stormy seascape tag with lighthouse
It’s starting to come together

Place the lighthouse into position. Almost there now, just a couple of final touches and your picture will be complete.

6: Adding texture

powertex texture on mdf tag
Time for some texture

Steel grey pigment with some easy structure paste create a rock for the lighthouse to stand on, and 3D Sand with Yellow Ochre Powertex form a shoreline. If you wish to add a few more wild white touches with a pallet knife, go for it.

Finished Piece

Although this is only A5 in size, I think it packs a punch.  As I stated above, this was very much a ‘go with the flow’ project. 

Of course does help to have a rough idea of composition to keep the image interesting. Being a fan of the so called rule of thirds so, I placed my focal point (the lighthouse) to the left of the scene.

I also roughly directed the white foam on the wave to guide the eye up towards my focal point.

Powertex tag by Donna Mcghie
Stormy sea tag
The finished stormy sea tag

Please do post photos of your own stormy sea tags over on the Powertex Facebook Page, we love seeing what you create. Also feel free to leave any comments on here.

You can get tips on using Stone Art clay on a canvas seascape in last month’s blog.

I’m the Powertex tutor for Southampton, so if you are interested in a workshop please pop over to my website where details can be found on the blog section. More info on Jenny Holzer can be found here.

That’s all from me for now folks. Keep on going with the flow and see you next month.

The Northern Lights in Powertex

Aurora Borealis in Powertex
Northern Lights using Powertex

Designer: Donna Mcghie

In this article I will show you how to recreate my interpretation of the Northern Lights using Powertex.

The Northern Lights, or Aurora Borealis have always fascinated me. Like the ocean which was the inspiration for my last blog, they have that ethereal, slightly unworldly quality. They are a reminder of just how wonderful nature can be.

The lovely Tracey Evans at Powertex HQ asked if I could use lots of colour and texture in this article. I used the gorgeous pigments to create the fluorescent greens and pinks for the sky. Textured stone art clay was added to signify water.

One thing I hadn’t realised before doing some research for this article, is that the Northern Lights also occur during the daytime.  However the human eye is unable to see them at these times as the sun is too strong for them to show up.

Materials List:

Cover the canvas

Powertex base for Northern Lights Blog
I mixed Sherbert Dip Pigment with White Fabric Hardener to create a luminous base

I roughly covered my canvas using a mixture of Sherbert Dip Pigment and White Powertex for the sky, and White and Blue Powertex for the sea.

Create crackles

Northern lights sky created using powertex pigments
I also added some Violet Valentine to the sky

After spraying with Black Bister I blasted with a hair dryer to create crackles, and used a palette knife to scrape back and allow the yellows to shine through.

Stone Art sea

Powertex Clay added to canvas for Northern Lights Blog
I had added in some trees in the background here, but they didn’t look right so I faded them out using my pigments over the top.

I used segments of Stone Art clay to create the illusion of a choppy sea. Powertex pearl pigments reflect the colours in the sky.

Tree textures

Powertex acrylic ink used to create trees on canvas
Rather than having the trees all along the shoreline, which didn’t look right, I opted to use an asymmetrical composition instead.

Putting a cluster of trees fading downwards, I painted some corrugated cardboard with acrylic and used a stubby brush to indicate branches.

Highlight waves

Powertex Power Wax to give highlights to waves on Stone Art Clay
Make Stone Art clay by mixing a small quantity of Stone Art with some Powertex until it forms a dough like substance

I liked the way the Stone Art clay waves were curling and decided to highlight this using Powercolor Titanium White Pigment.

Powerwax sky

I used Powertex Powerwax for a deep shine on the canvas
Powerwax is perfect for adding extra depth and shine.

Finally I added some extra depth to the colours in the sky using Powerwax and pigment. I dip my finger in the wax, then the pigment and gently rub on in a circular movement.

Using the Powerwax in the final stage really helped to bring the picture to life. I was able to create beautiful swirling patterns in the sky using the amazingly vibrant Pearl Pigments which gave just the ethereal atmosphere I was hoping for.

Northern Lights in Powertex

My finished Northern Lights Powertex Canvas

That’s all from me for this month. I hope you have enjoyed this step by step article, and would love to see any Northern Lights inspired artwork you create over on our Facebook page. Please feel free to leave any comments, (especially nice ones).

If you are in the Southampton area and fancy coming along to a workshop you can find all my upcoming events on the blog section of www.artandmurals.co.uk. My Facebook page also has my events listed.

Take care, and see you next month 🙂