Venetian Mask

Secret Art Box July 2019

Hi this is Kore and this month I got my hands on my first Powertex Secret Art Box! I was really surprised how much was packed into the box and the sample sizes of Powertex products are perfect. It was full of gorgeous things and I used just a few of the items to make this Venetian mask.

Venetian Mask from Secret Art Box Powertex by Kore Sage
Venetian Mask from Secret Art Box

I loved the colours chosen for this box, Plum acrylic paint, Turquoise and Berry pigments which look beautiful together. There is lots left for future creations too. I think this would be a great way to try Powertex Fabric Hardener for the first time or build up your supplies. The themed box is a great starting point if you’re stuck for an idea.

I worked on the large mdf mask in the box to create a wall art. I’ll make the second mask to hang with it too.

Materials list

I used the contents of the July Secret Art Box. I also used Easy Coat Mat from my stash to apply the Rice Paper and Brown Bister spray to colour the Easy 3D Flex.

Powertex Uk Secret Art Box contents July 2019
Powertex Secret Art Box July 2019

Make first layers

Paint the mdf mask with White Powertex to prepare it.

Rice paper

I added rice paper to one half of the mask using Easy Coat on the mdf and then over the top of the paper.

Easy 3D flex

Mix up some Easy 3D Flex with White Powertex and drag it over the other half of the mask. Leave to dry.

Powertex Venetian Mask layers with rice paper and Easy 3D Flex
Rice Paper and Easy 3D Flex

Add mdf shapes

Paint the shapes and glue them in place with White Powertex.

MDF flourishes
Adding mdf shapes

Add some fabric

Use some of the lace coated in Powertex to create textures and flourishes. I pinched a fan shape and rolled a trim into a flower shape.

Add fabric shapes with lace trim
Add fabric textures

Bister

When the Easy 3D Flex is dry and cracked, spray it generously with Brown Bister. Also spray the fabric pieces.

Spray generously with Bister
Spray generously with Bister

Add colour

Use the Plum acrylic paint to add colour to the mdf flourishes as this will be the base colour. Use the Turquoise pigment mixed with Easy Varnish on the edges of the mask.

Use Plum paint on the flourishes and edge the mdf with Turquoise pigment
Add colour with paint and pigment

Dry brushing metallics and turquoise

Add more colour to the to the mdf and fabric flourishes with the metallic pigment. Mix with Easy Varnish.

Use the metallic pigment mixed with Easy Varnish to add more colour
Add more colour

Adding highlights

Adding highlights is simple with White Powertex. Use a damp flat paintbrush and gently apply to the raised areas. I used the plaster flourish to add a white highlight to the other side.

Adding highlights with White Powertex
Adding highlights

Finishing touches

Add some of the tiny jewels for a bit of sparkle. You can also use Powertex and a little tshirt yarn to make a hanging hook for the back!

Venetian Mask wall art from Powertex Secret Art Box
Venetian Mask
Powertex hanging hook for venetian mask wall art
Hanging hook

Share your art

If you’ve received a secret art box we’d love to see what you create. Left over items can be combined with other boxes for lots of possibilties.

You can always share your makes in the subscribers Facebook group The Secret Art Box or The Powertex Studio. Or if you’re stuck for ideas don’t forget you can see other examples of subscription box makes from the Design Team to get you started.

Powertex Easy 3D Flex

Product of the Month for July 2019

Easy 3D comes as a heavy powder that is mixed with Powertex Fabric Hardener to create a clay. The clay is like dough and can be applied to canvas art as well as sculpture. It’s designed to crack as it dries which can leave deep cracked textures in the surface.

If you would like to try some Easy 3D Flex for yourself you can find it at Powertex UK. Need a little help to make up the clay? Just go to the instruction sheet at the bottom.

Powertex Design Team examples

The Design Team love to use this clay. Here’s some examples of how they’ve used it in their creations.

Sheep sculpture with Easy 3D Flex by Annette Smyth
Sculpture by Annette Smyth
Powertex Mixed media canvas by Anna Emelia Howlett
Mixed media canvas by Anna Emelia Howlett
Soul Sister sculpture with Powertex Easy 3D Flex by Donna Mcghie
Soul sister by Donna Mcghie

This planet art project by Jill has a tutorial in the Magazine, click on the image to open.

Powertex planet with Easy 3D Flex by Jill Cullum
Planet art by Jill Cullum
Canvas art by Fiona Potter Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Canvas art by Fiona Potter
Luxury egg by Jinny Holt with Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Mixed media egg by Jinny Holt

Shell’s beautiful Mandala art also has a tutorial, click on the image to see her step by step blog.

Mandala wall art by Shell North Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Mandala art by Shell North

This art doll kit is highly textured. You can see how Abigail puts this together in her tutorial, click on the image.

Powertex Art doll by Abigail Lagden
Art doll by Abigail Lagden
Canvas art by Kore Sage with Powertex textures
Canvas by Kore Sage

Find other project tutorials in this online magazine, just use the search bar to look for Easy 3D Flex in the categories.

Head over to Powertex Addicts United and join our community group, The Powertex Studio, share your creations. If you have a creation using Easy 3D clay, we’d love to see your makes.

If these projects have inspired you to try, you can get your own Easy 3D Flex at Powertex UK. Don’t forget you can use all your Powertex pigments, inks, paints and bister to colour these textures.

Here’s how to use Powertex Easy 3D Flex

If you’d like to mix your own Easy 3D clay but can’t get to a tutor, this will help you out.

Powertex Easy 3D Flex instruction sheet Powertex UK Easy3Dflex
How to use Powertex Easy 3D Flex

Powertex planets canvas art

Designer – Kore Sage

Powertex planets are a fun and easy canvas project to try. It doesn’t take much in the way of supplies and if you’ve used stencils or masks before you’re half way there! With Powertex you really can use basic techniques for amazing results.

Powertex planets canvas art by Kore Sage using Blue Powertex and Bister sprays
Powertex planets canvas art by Kore Sage

Materials list

  • Canvas – I used an inexpensive rectangular canvas
  • Blue and Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener
  • Ready Made Bister sprays in Black, Red, Yellow and Green
  • Stiff cardboard to cut own circular masks
  • Hairdryer

Prepare your canvas and card circles

Prep your canvas with Blue Powertex Fabric Hardener and while it’s drying cut your circle masks. Draw around plates or lids and carefully cut out. Keep both parts.

Prepare your canvas and cut card circle masks.
Step 1 Preparing your canvas and circles

Spray the background

Arrange your circular masks. Darken the background with Black Bister Spray. Vary the amount around the canvas. Leave this to dry naturally.

Spray the background with Bister spray in Black
Spray the background with Black Bister

Paint the planets

Swap the mask for the stencil on each planet and paint the circle with a layer of Ivory Powertex, not too thin. Do one at a time!

Swap to the stencil and apply a layer of Ivory Powertex
Swap to the stencil and apply a layer of Ivory Powertex

Spray the Bister

While the Powertex is still wet, leave the stencil in place and spray generously with Bister in your chosen colour. Notice I’ve protected the canvas.

Spraying Bister onto wet Powertex
Spray Bister onto wet Powertex

Create the Bister crackles

Heat the Bister with a hairdryer until cracks start to form in the surface. A heatgun or tool can be too hot for this. Repeat these steps for all your planets.

Using a hairdryer to create Bister crackles
Heat the Bister until crackles form

Starry night

Put half a teaspoon of Ivory Powertex on a plate and use a very wet paintbrush to splatter it across the surface for stars. I had a practice on paper first!

Use a wet paintbrush to spray on stars with Ivory Fabric Hardener
Adding stars with Ivory Powertex

Finishing touches

One of my planets had smeared a lot so I tidied it up with a bit of Blue Powertex and Black Bister when it was dry. I didn’t worry too much about the others and I thought they looked pretty good. I love the blue Powertex coming through the Black Bister too!

Powertex planets canvas by Kore Sage
Powertex planets canvas by Kore Sage

Top Tips for Powertex planets

Each planet will take a while to dry so be careful when masking the rest of your canvas. I used a piece of printer paper held near my planets while I sprayed them. Using more than one colour of Bister on a planet to give it a darker side helps them look dimensional. Try Easy Structure paste or 3d balls to add texture before you add Bister.

Thanks for reading my blog today. I hope you will have a go at painting your own Powertex planets! If you do, please share your art in the Powertex Facebook group as we love to see what you make.

If you like to see more of my Powertex art, you might like my under the sea mixed media project here on the magazine or you can follow me on Facebook or on my website where I love to share my Powertex tips and art.

Until next time, make time to let your art out!

Moonlit sea with Powertex

Designer – Kore Sage

I’m lucky enough to live a short walk from the sea. I love to visit under the moonlight and listen to the waves. The colours of the water and the beach are so magical under a full moon. The nautical themed mdf was perfect for creating moonlit sea scenes.

The lighthouse had a lovely message in this piece. That no matter how deep the water gets, trust that you will find your way. I hope my plaques inspire you to create your own underwater scenes.

Moonlit sea scene with Powertex and metallic pigments by Kore Sage
Moonlit sea scene by Kore Sage

Metallic pigments for a moonlit night

Metallic pigments are perfect for creating a moonlit glow on my scenes. For the base colour I used Black Powertex on one design and White Powertex on the other.

On this first plaque, I used Black Powertex to paint and adhere layers of mdf with a nautical theme. Stone Art clay was used in the tiny ammonite mould for the little fossils. I also used lumps of the clay for rocks, building dimension and lifting the mdf shapes.

Powertex mixed media detail by Kore Sage
Texture details

Tiny fabric scraps, 3d balls and Powercotton completed the underwater look. I left it to dry before adding the colours.

Pigments were mixed with Easy Varnish and dry brushed over the textures. I use Golden Olive, Violet Valentine and Blue Curacao which made a beautiful moonlit glow.

Powertex moonlit sea plaque by Kore Sage
Moonlit scene

Ivory Powertex and Bister

Powertex Moonlit sea scene
Under the sea scene

My second scene used Ivory Powertex to paint the pieces and adhere it all together. I used tissue paper and cardboard for the back ground. Stone Art clay built up the scene with the mdf shapes. Small, medium 3d balls and sand added extra texture.

Wite Powertex base
White Powertex

When dry I sprayed it heavily with Blue and Black Bister sprays. I used a strong Rust mix and poured this over some of the textures. I sprayed this with a vinegar and water mix.

When that was all dry I chose Aqua Metallic ink and Copper pigment to highlight my textures.

Copper details on Powertex scene
Copper highlights

These watery moonlit sea scenes were really fun to create and will look great hanging in my home. Be inspired and have a try yourself. Do share your makes over on the Facebook group too, we love to see your creations. Or you can tag us on Instagram with #powertexaddict

Powertex mixed media plaques by Kore Sage

If you like the watery theme you might also like this project. You can also find more of my Powertex art at Kore Sage Art. Until next time, find some time to let your art out.

Powertex DIY Lamp

Powertex DIY Lamp by Kore Sage

Designer: Kore Sage

Make a Powertex DIY lamp for lovely gifts or home decor and with Powertex you can make your own. Powertex fabric sculpture and fairy lights are an easy way to craft a lamp. I’m using battery powered LED fairy lights. Be sure to use LED lights for you project as these keep cool. Do not use a flame candle in this lamp.

I’m Kore and I want to show you how I made my own Powertex lamp using a bottle for a “mould”, simple Powertex techniques and a pack of battery LED fairy lights. Choose your own favourite embellishments to create the lamp in your own style. I’m using white fairy lights but coloured lights would be lovely too.

Powertex Lamp with LED fairy lights
Powertex DIY Lamp

Materials list

Powertex Universal Medium in Ivory

Ready Made Bister Spray in Blue

Colortricx pigment in Rich Gold

Easy Varnish

A large bottle or container for a mould

A plastic bag

Masking tape

Cotton fabric strips about 2″ – 3″ wide and a square for the bottom

MDF Dropouts

MDF Alphabet

3d Balls

Battery powered LED fairy lights

Prepare a mould

Wrap your bottle with plastic and secure with small pieces of tape. Don’t wrap too tight and ensure there are no holes.

Wrap the bottle in plastic
Step one

Wrap the bottle

Using fabric with Powertex, cover the bottom of the bottle first and apply strips in spirals upwards. Leave gaps in the wrapping for the light.

Use Powertex with fabric to wrap the bottle
Step two
Leave to dry for a few hours before removing the bottle

Decorate with embellishments

I used Powertex Ivory to add some 3d balls, mdf drop outs and letters. The structure is sturdy but avoid heavy embellishments at the top.

Add embellishments
Step three

Colour with Bister spray

Spray generously with Ready Made Bister Spray. Don’t forget the underneath, I left the inside Ivory.

Spray generously with Blue Bister
Step four

Create highlights

I used a damp cloth to wipe back some of the Bister from the raised textures.

Wipe away Bister form textures with a damp cloth
Step five

Add some shine

Metallics add a little extra shine on a lamp. I mixed Rich Gold powder pigment with Easy Varnish and dry brushed some textures.

Dry brush with Rick Gold pigment
Step six
Powertex DIY Lamp Insert LED lights for a lovely glow
Insert the LED lights for a lovely glow

I hope you have a go at making a lamp. Do share your creations with us in the Facebook group at Powertex Addicts United. If you’ve enjoyed this idea you might also want to take a look at Donna’s bottle light project too.

You can find more of my art and Powertex at Kore Sage Art but until next time, I hope you find some time to let your art out.

Pastel Powertex Bottle Vases

Powertex bottle vases in pastels

Designer: Kore Sage

How to create Pastel Powertex

Pastel colours can be mixed with Powertex universal medium to create soft effects for your projects. Pastel Powertex is perfect for Spring projects, florals and even Mother’s Day gifts. I’m Kore and I want to show you how I mix pastel colours and highlight the textures. I’ll be transforming small glass drink bottles into floral Spring vases.

Powertex bottle vases in pastels
Powertex pastel bottle vases

Powertex Universal Medium colours are all mixable and with the exception of Transparent, will be weatherproof when cured. Pastel colours can be mixed using Ivory or White although I used Ivory for my project.

I recommend you experiment with tiny amounts of your colours to find your favourite combinations. I’m using my favourite pale blue. I add small amounts of blue Powertex to Ivory (or White) until I have a shade I like.

It is possible to mix more than two colours together. For example Blue and Yellow Ochre to make green then mix with Ivory for a lighter shade.

Materials list

Prepare the fabric

Cut strips of light fabric approximately 1-2 inches wide, pieces of string 2 – 4 inches long and choose embellishments.

Preparing strips of fabric for Powertex bottle
Step one

Mix pastel Powertex

Pour your Ivory Powertex onto a plate or dish and add a tiny amount of Blue Powertex. Add a little until you have a pastel shade.

Mixing Powertex pastel colours with Blue and Ivory
Step two

Wrap the bottle

Coat fabric strips with the Powertex mix and wrap around the bottle until it’s covered. Wrap loosely in spirals.

Bottle wrapped with fabric in blue Powertex
Step three

Add embellishments

Add string and floral embellishments. I created spiral shapes with string and coated embellishments with Powertex and adhered them to the bottle.

Blue Powertex bottle adding string and wooden embellishments
Step four

Mix dry paint

Mix a dry paint with white Powercolor and Easy Varnish

Mixing white paint with Easy Varnish and White Powercolor powder
Step five

Highlight textures

Use a dry brushing technique to highlight the textures of the fabric and the enbellishments. Keep your brush flat and in the same direction.

Using a dry brushing technique to highlight textures
Step six

Pastel Powertex bottle

These Spring vases use simple techniques to create textured vases that can be made in your favourite colours. They look lovely in groups with your favourite single stem flowers. 

Finished pastel blue bottle

Please do leave me a comment if you would like to try Powertex in pastels. Or hop over to this article where Abigail is mixing purple for her mixed media project. Like our Facebook page where you can join the private group and share your own makes.

I hope you make some time to let your art out. Find more of my work at Kore Sage Art, until next time, Kore x

Powertex Art Doll Time

Powertex art doll Kore Sage

Powertex Art Doll time on the blog again. These kits are a wonderful project to do if you’re looking to spread your creative wings. The template gives you a starting point with lots of room to try new techniques and ideas. I used a few techniques on my art doll to represent “time flies” but you could just choose the parts you like. That’s the beauty of these kits. Having no rules can be scary like a blank canvas but just try a technique or two that you like and make it yours. Here she is, my Powertex art doll using the small template.

Powertex Art Doll project by Kore Sage
Powertex Art Doll by Kore Sage

Supplies

Powertex small art doll mdf kit
Powertex Small art doll kit

These were the supplies used on this art doll.

Small art doll mdf kit

Powertex Universal Medium in Transparent, Ivory and Black

Rice Paper

Easy Coat Mat

Rusty Powder

Easy Structure

3d Sand and Small balls

Acrylic paints in Red Velvet and Orange Marmalade

Mdf drop outs

Powercotton

Assorted keys from Treasure boxes

Paper fasteners

Getting started

First pop out your Mdf shapes and try some layouts that you like. When you’re settled on a placement, start to prepare your pieces. I tore up a piece of rice paper to roughly fit the body. The theme is “time flies” so I chose a paper with pocket watches on. This fits the rectangular base of the “box”.

Gathering some of my favourite embellishments makes the art doll unique. I added a circle of hessian fabric that was hardened with Black Powertex, to support the plaster face because I wanted to tilt her head. Small wooden shapes add interest and the Mdf drop outs were perfect for this. At this stage I decided I wanted to give her two halves.

Powertex Art Doll arranging pieces by Kore Sage
Laying out the pieces

Powertex art doll time, assemble the pieces

To start, get your pieces together with your chosen Powertex and a flat paintbrush. Apply the pocket watch rice paper to the mdf using Easy Coat Matt. Brush it onto the mdf first and lay the paper on top and gently coat with a brush, from the centre outwards. Easy Coat allows any accidental Powertex to be wiped away from the paper. Transparent Powertex will also work but will be less wipeable.

With Black Powertex, start to assemble your doll by painting and sticking the pieces together. Be careful to turn the base panel so the holes are at the bottom. Layer the “frame” underneath the “box” and do not add the bottom panel. Put the “hooks” into place here with the hooks facing forwards. I waited until the textures had been added but you can do it at this stage. Focus on painting the front first and paint the back when it’s dry. At this stage you can start to see how you can decorate your art doll.

Assembling the art doll by Kore Sage
Assembling the Art Doll

While the doll is drying, it’s a great time to prepare any embellishments with acrylic paint, Black and Ivory powertex. Decorate your pieces how you like but at this stage I’m starting to identify which pieces I want to be coloured and which pieces I’m keeping Black or Ivory. Don’t forget the “leg” pieces too, I prepared these with acrylic paints.

Adding texture

When your doll is touch dry use Easy Structure on a plastic palette knife to add thick texture on the wings and around the sides of the body. Use the paste to hide the hard edges where the “frame” part is used to lift up the box. Create indentations and marks on the wings and sides.

At this point I’m also starting to define the two halves of the doll using Ivory Powertex on the box sides and on the rays around her head. Leave this to dry for several hours as the Easy Structure is quite thick in places.

Powertex Art Doll choosing pieces embellishments Kore Sage
Preparing mdf pieces

Rusty Powder

Rusty Powder adds real rust texture and colour. I wanted a dark rust that would show off layers of the transparent acrylic paints on one side but appear very dark on the other side. The mixture I made is Rusty Powder 50/50 with Transparent Powertex and a little white vinegar. Use 3d sand to thicken the mixture and 3d small balls to add texture. Prepare a spray bottle with white vinegar and water and make sure it has plenty of vinegar for a dark rust, about 40%.

Plastic palette knives are perfect for applying the rusty mixture over the wings, head base (not the plaster) and the sides. Paste a little on the “leg” pieces too for texture and colour. Spray these areas generously with the vinegar and water spray and leave it to rust for a few hours before repeating the process. Doing the same again with a slightly weaker rust mixture will give you different shades of rust although this is optional.

Art Doll with Rusty Powder by Kore Sage
Art Doll Texture with Rusty Powder

Acrylic paints

The Secret Art Loft acrylic paints from Powertex UK are easy to blend and their transparency makes them perfect for this project. I layered Red Velvet and Orange Marmalade paints onto the rusty areas but only on the left side of the doll. This defined the halves and brightened one side. I also painted the left side of the plaster face with Red Velvet paint and left it to dry. You can repeat these steps as often as you need to get the colour you like.

Art Doll Acrylic paint by Kore Sage
Adding Colour with Acrylic paint

The body of the art doll

The body of the doll is the “box” part and this is a great place to get creative, it’s like a mini canvas. Your chosen rice paper might determine the style of embellishments you use. The rice paper is already in place but I wanted to add some details to the body. I had already prepared my embellishments for this but didn’t use everything that I’d chosen. Coat a small wooden heart with Red Velvet paint and use transparent Powertex to adhere some Small balls. Paint it again with red paint when dry. Glue the heart and silver key in place with Transparent Powertex.

Paint some tiny circles from the drop outs pack in Black and Ivory Powertex to match the dark and light sides of the doll. The threads you can see criss-crossing over the doll are threads pulled from some hessian fabric. Cut strands roughly to size, cover them in black Powertex and leave to dry on a plastic mat while checking they are straight.

When dry, use Transparent Powertex to stick these into a criss-cross pattern over the box. After this, use the drop out circles to cover the ends of the threads and create a pattern around the edge. Coat the body and the hooks on the right side of the doll with Ivory. Your doll is coming together nicely but there’s something crucial missing!

Powertex art doll body by Kore Sage
Decorating the Body

The doll’s head

Transparent Powertex is perfect as a glue to keep the plaster face in place, slightly tilted to one side. Cut six chunks of Powercotton into thick pieces about 3 inches long to create the hair. Lay them on a non stick mat and use a paintbrush to carefully push Ivory Powertex into the fibres however try to keep the strands fairly straight and not too tangled! Brush down in the same direction until the Powertex is massaged into the fibres. When it’s well coated, curl the pieces around the head and down the side of the doll keeping lots of texture. You could apply hair to both sides of course but I chose to keep the “halves” of the doll.

When I applied the curls they were starting to fall quite flat so I used some Large 3d balls underneath and in her hair to keep it propped up! I just glued them in place with Transparent Powertex. In addition, this added extra texture and where the balls could be seen they looked like bubbles in her hair!

To add a bit of colour and texture to this side, I brushed her face, hair and small cardboard stars with Ivory Powertex, pushed the stars into her hair and sprinkled a little Rusty Powder over the wet Powertex. I spritzed a quick spray of the vinegar and water mixture to get the rusting started and because the spray is strong I didn’t need to repeat it.

Art Doll Face and Hair by Kore Sage
The Face and Hair

Finishing touches

There’s just a few finishing touches before our doll is ready to display. I’ve already painted the “legs” and given them a rust treatment so now I just paint one leg with Ivory to match the light side. Fit paperfasteners through the holes as “knees” and “hips” for the doll so the legs could hang underneath. Dab black Powertex on the paper fasteners to cover their metallic colour.

The tiny padlock was given the rust treatment earlier and was attached with a little jump ring. I chose tiny keys from the Treasure box which were hung on jump rings and then off the hooks at the bottom. Brush a quick flick of Ivory Powertex to add a highlight to the red side of her face and she’s done!

Art Doll finishing touches by Kore Sage
Art Doll finishing touches

I can really recommend the art dolls if you like a project you can get creative with. The clock is next on my list! The design team members have created their own unique art dolls and you can see them here.

Time flies Powertex art doll

Powertex art doll Kore Sage
Powertex Art Doll by Kore Sage

I hope you enjoyed the art dolls project as much as I have. Join us over on Facebook if you have a Powertex project to share, just pop by Powertex Addicts United and join The Powertex Studio group. We love to see your makes and it’s a great place to get some inspiration or ask questions. You can find out more about me and my art on Facebook at Kore Sage Art.

Create faux stone effect with Powertex by Kore Sage

Stone effect Powertex Stone Art

Powertex Stone art is a product for creating fine textures, faux stone effect and of course air drying clay. Use with Powertex Universal Medium for convincing stone results.

Stone effect Powertex Stone Art

Hi it’s Kore! So this month is all about Stone Art at Powertex HQ. It’s the perfect opportunity to show you a favourite technique of mine. I’m demonstrating how to create a faux stone effect on almost any surface. In this demonstration I’ll be using a piece of styrofoam. Watch the video for my demonstration and pop the sound on. I’ve listed my supplies below.

Supplies

Powertex Stone Art Faux Stone

Pop the sound on for this video demonstration or continue for photo description.

Step 1

Applying Powertex

Put a little Powertex medium onto your plate and use your fingers to apply it unevenly to the surface, not too thin. Wear a glove for this if you like.

Step 2

Applying Stone Art

addingstoneart

Use a dry hand to sprinkle Stone Art powder onto the wet Powertex. Cover it completely and be generous. Don’t worry we won’t waste any! Press the Stone Art onto the wet Powertex firmly. Use your fingers to brush off any excess powder into your spare container. Repeat this process as many times as you like to create your textures. You can apply it more in some areas. I recommend leaving to dry for a while before moving to the next step. You can use a hairdryer to speed this up if you wish.

Step 3

Buffing your textures

Powertex Stone Art layer on styrofoam

When you have your dry layers of Stone Art we want to remove any loose powder. Use your fingers flat over the textures, rubbing firmly to remove any Stone Art that’s not stuck down. Any loose powder can be saved into your container and used again. It will be more textured than the “new” Stone Art. Buff over the whole piece until your happy. You should be able to see your textures well now.

Step 4

Using Bister sprays

Adding Bister spray to Stone Art textures

To make the most of the textures, spray Bister generously onto the piece. You can use any colours, layer them up and mix them together. Dry them off in between if you like. I find the more the better here.

Next use a damp sponge to wipe the Bister from the raised areas. This creates highlights. Repeat these steps until you get a result you like. The Bister is water based and not permanent so you can wipe this back and repeat as much as you like.

You can use this technique on most surfaces including glass, canvas and wood. If you have a plastic surface, the Powertex will likely peel off. It’s a good idea to prime the surface first with masking tape, gesso or a spray primer.

As Bister is not permanent you may wish to seal your project with varnish. You can use Easy Varnish but a spray varnish will also work well.  These pieces make great bases for animal sculptures! Note that Stone Art is made of paper and varnish is also highly flammable so is not suitable for use with real candles.

I hope you’ve learnt something you can use.  There are other Stone Art projects on the blog if you feel inspired. If you have a question about this technique, leave me a comment and I’ll do my best to help.

You can find more of my projects over at Kore Sage Art.

Until next time, let your art out!

Kore x

Powertex Happiness Jars – Kore Sage

Powertex Happiness Jars

With the festive season in full swing, it’s a time we give thanks and reflect before moving into the new year. Many of us state intentions and plan to start something new. Maybe you make resolutions or choose a word for the year. I’m trying something new with this project too. Every day I write three things I’m thankful for in my journal but with this project I’m keeping them in a jar instead. These Happiness Jars will help me to keep focused on positive things into the new year and through 2019.

GratJarCUWide

Happiness Jars have been around a long time in craft circles but I’ve never decorated my own with Powertex. Of course with endless Powertex possibilities I needed to narrow down a couple of techniques! I chose Stone Art and Easy Structure techniques but fabric wrapping or Stone Art clay would be fantastic. These are the jars I made using simple techniques.

Powertex Happiness Gratitude Jars by Kore Sage

Powertex Happiness Jars

The idea is to fill them up with your wishes, intentions or thanks. Use pieces of coloured paper and write thanks each day to add to your Gratitude jar or maybe a hope to your Wish Jar or a happy moment to a Memory Jar. Read these anytime or save them up for the end of the year. They make a great boost on tough days.

Gratitude Jar with Easy Structure

Supplies:

A glass jar with lid, Easy Structure, 3d Balls, mdf alphabet, clay flowers from the daisy mould, some mdf Dropouts and some bits from my stash. To finish, Red and Blue Powertex Universal Medium and Easy Varnish with Copper Colortricx pigment. Use what ever you have to embellish and colour your jar.

Clean the jar to remove any glue from the outside. Use a plastic palette knife to add the Easy Structure paste over a couple of areas on the jar and to cover the lid. I had my embellishments ready and just pushed them into the paste. The Easy Structure is super strong and holds everything really well. I added letters, a few flowers and leaves, mdf circles from the drop outs pack and some 3d balls.

It’s a good idea to clean off any paste smudges you don’t want with a wet cloth before you leave it to dry. I left mine overnight.

GratJar2

Paint your textures with Powertex, I used a mix of Red and Blue Powertex (to make a dark purple) but any dark colour will work well. Wipe off any excess Powertex from the glass and leave to dry for an hour or so.

Finishing touches are done with a dry brushing technique with Copper Colortricx. Mix a little powder pigment into a tiny amount of Easy Varnish with a flat brush, for a dry paint. Wipe off the excess onto a paper towel before brushing over the textures to highlight them.

GratJarCUSq600

Wish Jar

Supplies:

I used Transparent Powertex (but any colour will work for this), Stone Art and Colortricx Powerpearl pigment with Easy Varnish.

I stenciled shapes onto the jar (the Wonderland stencil was good for this). This was fairly easy because of the flat sides but would also work on a round jar. A little masking tape to hold the stencil in place helped before I applied a little Powertex through the stencil with a brush. Then press on a little Stone Art Powder while it’s wet. Brush away any excess. Repeat the shapes all over the jar and leave to dry for an hour.

For the lid, coat with Powertex and then Stone Art and add an embellishment. I added a wooden star left over from my Christmas stash.

Mixing up some Powerpearl pigment with a bit of Easy Varnish was a quick way to highlight the raised areas. I used a small brush to add the Powerpearl finish to the stenciled shapes and over the lid. Then a quick brush of Copper over the star. The perfect little jar for my wishes!

WishJarFinSqWeb2

A note about working on glass

Powertex will stick to glass however it can be a bit slippery! If you want to wrap fabric around your jar, small pieces of tape can help. A light weight fabric is a good choice for this project as it might not need tape.

A new start

These jars are the perfect way to start the new year, full of thanks and hope for the coming months. There are so many ways to alter the jars and make something you can treasure all year. Whether you make a wish jar, a memory keeper or a pick-me-up jar I hope you share your creation at Powertex Addicts United so I can see! How will you use your Happiness Jar?

I’m so pleased to say that I’ll be back next year with more projects for the Powertex Design Team. It’s such a pleasure to be part of this amazing team and to be creating new projects to share here. You can also find more of my projects and blogs at Kore Sage Art.

The festive season is well under way and it’s a busy time for many. However you’re spending this time of year I hope you find some time to let your art out.

Until next time,

Kore x

Introducing the Powertex UK Design Team and Guests 2019

received_327395237855903

You will notice some familiar faces to the Powertex UK Design Team 2019 and some new ones too.

0.JPG

Abigail Lagden – Back for her second year.

I am a self taught artist based on the outskirts of Bishop Auckland, County Durham. I absolutely adore the rich, intense colours and the amazing depth and textures that you can create with Powertex. I love all things magical, mystical and fantastical, and find this influence has a tendency to creep into most of my creations!

0.JPG

Annette Smyth – Back for her third year

‘I live in Leamington Spa with my husband and three dogs. I’ve created all my life and love the flexibility Powertex gives me to use my existing skills and develop new ones. Every day is a creative adventure. ‘

0.JPG

Donna Mcghie – Back for her second year

I am a level 4 Powertex tutor and continue to be inspired and amazed by the variety of ways this medium can be used both for my individual art projects, and also for my art 4 a heart workshops. £5 from each booking under the Art 4 A Heart banner gets donated to the brilliant Papworth Hospital Charity who saved my husbands life with an emergency heart transplant a few years ago.

0.JPG

Fiona Potter – Back for her third year

Hi Fi Potter here and boy I am so excited to be back for a third year on the Powertex DT. I am basedin north Warwickshire a stones throw from the NEC. I’m a lifelong crafter working with textiles,mixed media and found objects. I enjoy creating everything from delicate to chunky jewellery, wall art and home decor and this coming year I’m challenging myself to be more sculptural and push myself out of my comfort zone. Join me for the ride and lets see where 2019 takes us!

0.JPG

Jill Cullum – New to the Team

I live in North Lincolnshire with my partner Karl and guinea pig, Toffee. I have always been creative so discovering Powertex was the icing on the cake! I am a mother and Nanny as well as having a busy, stressful ‘day’ job. I love using my creativity to switch off from day to day stresses, finding it therapeutic and rewarding. My favourite Powertex products? Difficult one, but Rusty Powder along with 3D Sand Balls would be at the top of my list.

0.JPG

Jinny Holt – Back for her second year

Hi I’m Jinny Holt.
I live in Scotland, wife, mother, nanny.
During the day I am a support worker for adults with additional needs.
Creativity is my life misson and therapy!
I love working with Powertex, love Stone art and Easy 3D, more texture the better. I tend to do darker pieces but enjoy pretty sometimes.

0.JPG

Kore Sage – Back for her second year

I’m a mixed media artist living in Brighton. I love walks on the beach, to paint, journal, create, share my process and live a creative life with an 80s soundtrack. Before art I had a dining room table. I really enjoy canvases that are very layered. My favourite products to use are Easy Structure and Rusty Powder because I can combine these with other products for so many different effects.

0.JPG

Shell North – New to the team

Mum of 3 grown children, Nanny to 2, Yorkshire born but living in Dorset with my Partner. I’m a full time artist with qualifications in substance counselling and special needs care so the importance of art therapy is a huge part of my artistic journey. I love immersing myself in mix media and sculpting. Whimsical, magical, and fantasy as well as nature inspire me artistically.

0.JPG

Anna Emelia Howlett –  Back for her third year

Based in Maidstone , Kent. I work in mixed media and I’m inspired by most things magical. I think in this day and age we never seem to make enough time for ourselves. I truly believe art can give us the space our bodies need to breathe. Being creative is continuing to improve my well-being, and I love sharing that and helping others make that time to enhance their creative side. I love EVERYTHING about Powertex I can’t chose a favourite product it’s way too hard!

And please welcome the Powertex UK 2019 guest bloggers.

AW Me & Tracey

Anne Waller – Back again for her 3rd year

My favourite product has to be the Transparent Powertex. It has so many uses in my textile work. Often it is the ‘unseen hero’ stabilising and securing thread work on the back of a piece. When it comes to mixed media, then it has to be the Bronze Powertex. It provides the perfect base for yummy shimmering pearlescent and metallic pigments. I just love a bit of bling!

0.JPG

Patricia Williams – Powertex tutor

I am a Mixed Media Artist using the name Alex Henry.  Specialising in Powertex products, creating sculptures and running workshops. I have worked with children in local youth groups and recently exhibited at the Jinney Ring Sculpture Trail. Many hours of my time is spent experimenting with Powertex.

992db-dsc01606

Sam Butler – I love to play, dabble and experiment and will give anything a go!! My favourite colour is green, however I do love the black Powertex! But my most, most favourite product at the moment is StoneArt, I can’t get enough of it.

Do sign  up to the blog so that you are able to receive all the latest tutorials and blogs brought to you by the design team!received_327395237855903