Inspiration for an Artwork

Texture inspiration

Where to find Inspiration for an artwork

I am often asked where I get my inspiration for an artwork from. Well mostly the answer is, “it’s all around me”. Because I see inspiration when I’m out for daily walks with my camera. It might be in nature, in architecture, in the many working environment. In the weather, the clouds, a sound, a smell, a texture or a chance conversation. So these are all things that spark ideas in my head which lead me to the creation.

The images below were all taken within 20 minutes of one of these walks. I have worked in my day job for 8 years and never noticed this door before, but the light on that day was so bright that it drew me in. Just look at all that detail in the texture, layers of paint, rust and dust.

A hopper door that has lots of texture, years of dust, rust and layers of colour
Hopper Door – Look at the texture!
Layers of paint, rust and texture in a recessed door handle. Inspiration for an artwork.
Rusty inset door handle

Rusty Inspiration

The detail in this image is perfect for using Powertex Rusty Powder with lead and yellow ochre Powertex to recreate a rusty element.

This measures around 15cm x 10cm on a door that is around 6 meters high.

When you’re out and about be mindful, look out for the detail as well as the bigger picture. You never know what you might find to inspire a new piece of work especially a Powertex project! .

The image on the right is the bottom edge of the door in the first image.

Look at that luscious texture and rust. The tongue and groove in this piece have given me an idea for the base of my next Powertex project, can you guess what it will be?

All three of these images have inspired and will play apart in my March Powertex project.

Bottom edge of door with hinge and rust and lots more texture. Inspiration for an artwork.
Bottom edge of door with hinge and rust
Oak boule with deeply textured bark
Oak Boule with bark

This final image was also captured on the same day and is the deeply textured bark on an oak boule.

For those who don’t know and I didn’t until last year when these started appearing in our timber yard, a boule is the whole tree trunk that is cut into planks.

This too will play a part in my March project.

What will my inspired artwork be?

So have you guessed what my March step by step Powertex project will be? Can you guess what Powertex products I am planning to use to re-create these wonderful textures and colours? If you have an idea then why not leave a comment below. You might think of something I haven’t!

I hope you found some inspiration for an artwork in this article. Keep ‘texing and pop back in March for the finished step by step project. Looking for more inspiration. Do have at my look last project for more inspiration, which you can find here.

Bye for now, Fi

Butterfly dreams of Powertex

Have you noticed an animal theme this month with Abigail’s adorable elephant and Donna’s beautiful afghan hound? Hi it’s Kore here with my August blog. So how about a butterfly? I know, it’s an insect really but it’s a beautiful creature that needs celebrating! I live in a busy city and don’t see too many butterflies but I have lovely memories of Buddleia bushes full of Red Admirals and Peacocks. The wonderful thing about this butterfly is that it can be made with whatever materials you have and what ever size you like for home or garden.

 

Creating the base

Make wings from wire and foil or cut them from thick card. Masking tape is great for covering foil. I made the body from some rolled up foil and taped this too. Rolled up paper would work too. A quick look on the internet for a template was helpful with the shape. Then the Powertex came out!

Using bright Powertex 

I used Red Powertex because I wanted to experiment. There are no rules here. Use what you have to cover the wings and the body pieces. I cut pieces of cotton fabric, massaged in some red Powertex and wrapped these around the body and wings until they were all covered on both sides. It was fun to create lots of texture in the wings and make ragged edges.When the parts were covered I used pieces of fabric in Powertex to attach the wings to the body. I tucked a couple of wire antennae into the body too.

Decorating the butterfly

This where you can get really play with your favourite materials. Use what you have to add texture and colour. I covered the “back” of the wings with a mix of red Powertex and Rusty Powder and small balls. It’s one of my favourite combinations and the red gives the rust a lovely warm glow.

Try this:Spray Bister through stencils or allow it to “puddle” in the texturesSprinkle small balls or sand onto wet PowertexUse Easy Structure to create lines and shapesSprinkle Bister granules onto wet Powertex for little shots of intense colour and textureSplatter acrylic inks and paints

There are so many ways to add colour but I was really happy with using Bister sprays on my butterfly. I chose Red and Yellow and sprayed generously to let the colour run around in the textures. I also used the brown Bister to paint circles onto the back of the wings. I also used some acrylic inks from The Secret Art Loft at Powertex UK. I let Viola ink just run all over it. Let it dry!

Decorate both sides of the wings using your favourite products. The wings are a great place to try something new. This is where it’s fun to have no plan! I really enjoyed just playing and if I didn’t like something I either wiped it off or painted over it!

Final touches

Adding the last highlights is really fun with Powertex. I dry brushed with orange and yellow ochre pigments in Easy Varnish first. I chose to highlight with Ivory Powertex and Limoncello metallic pigment which worked beautifully to add some sparkle.

Then a timely delivery of Metallic gold ink Powertex UK. I couldn’t resist adding some to my butterfly. It’s lush and rich and it’s going to be amazing for some autumn projects! A little on the wings and antennae for a finishing touch.

While I was waiting for one stage to dry, I took the chance to make a couple of tiny butterflies. I printed a couple of butterfly templates from the internet. I glued them onto card so I could cut out two sturdy little butterflies and then painted them with Powertex. I used less texture on these but still applied some rusty texture and then played with acrylic paints and metallic pigment powders.

The acrylic paints were in Blueberry Pie and Orange Marmalade and the pigments in Berry sour and Tequila sunrise. Gorgeous! The puddles of bister on the back of these is wonderful.

 

I think I’ll keep adding different textures and colour to these butterflies. Just when I think I’m done I have an idea to add something else! She’s a big butterfly too. When she’s finished, a coat of varnish (to fix the Bister) and she’ll be a lovely on an outside wall.

After a few days the Powertex will harden and fix your butterfly. In my pictures she’s still new and not hardened so I can move the wings. When you leave your butterfly to set I recommend propping up the wings so they can harden in your preferred position.

So pick out your favourite materials and decorate a butterfly. It’s time to let your art out!

If you would like to see more Powertex creations pop along to The Powertex Studio facebook group where you can share your makes too. Powertex Addicts United on Instagram has lots of inspiration from across the world.

You can also follow my Powertex experiments and projects @skysagestudio on Facebook and Instagram or find my personal Powertex blogs over at koresageart.com.

Until next time,
Kore x

Steampunk Jewellery Plier Stands (by Anne)

I have been meaning to decorate my jewellery plier stands for ages and finally got them finished.
I had a bit of a problem with these in that they started off as a plain varnished wood surface. I initially coated them with white Gesso with a view to painting them with acrylics. However, the Gesso did not bind well to the varnish layer – eek! All ideas were halted. These need to be fairly robust and a tonne of flaky chips after a short use was not what I wanted!
I then discovered Powertex and yay, I would be able to rescue and decorate my plier stands after all. Coating the entire surface with rice papers and torn kitchen towels would create a tough protective skin over the surface and prevent the feared chipping off of the base layers.
HOW IT WAS DONE
I first collected together lots of embellishments; die cut cogs and pipework (Sizzix dies), MDF Keyplate (Powertex), metal clock hand and chains, old light bulbs and screws.
I tore out images from Creative Rice Paper (Powertex). This particular sheet seems to be out of stock but there is a similar Victorian Steampunk Paper available. I also separated layers of kitchen paper and tore them into pieces to coat the surface. This would add texture and a protective layer.
STAGE ONE
First I applied the torn decorative papers using Easy Coat Mat Medium. Ivory Powertexwas then painted on to blend in the image edges.
STAGE TWO
Next layers of kitchen paper were bonded all over the surface. Some were glued down with Ivory and some with Terracotta Powertex. Die cut card embellishments were also coated with Powertex and glued down.
Texture was added by applying Easy Structure Pastethrough a texture stencil.
I also had a try at the rust technique. I mixed some Rusty Powder into Ivory Powertex along with a few drops of white wine vinegar. This was painted and dribbled over the surface (extra powder sprinkled on top) and spritzed with water and vinegar before leaving overnight to develop. I spritzed at intervals, several times. I avoided the areas that will be in contact with my pliers.
STAGE THREE
Next I brushed over and added colour using Acrylic Inks in Tangerine, Egg Yolk, Aqua and Metallic Gold.
STAGE FOUR
I also applied a little gold Pebeo Gilding Wax on some areas. When fully dry and cured (I left them for 3 weeks) I coated the surface with Easy Varnish to fully seal and protect.
I have included lots of images of how all the surfaces were built up.
Texture and die cut cogs have been added.
Rust and colour added.
Side finished with stronger thick greyboard embellishments. Any large embellishments protruding from edges need to be strong (thinner card would be prone to warp and bend).
I started with a larger clock image on the other side.
Die cuts and texture added plus a metal clock hand for dimension.
Finally finished with thicker embellishments and more dry brush work and gilding wax.
Love this character.
Texture and layers built up. Waiting for the rust to develop.
Building up the layers of transparent colour makes so much difference.
The second plier stand started off in the same way.
At this stage you might feel like giving up. What a mess!
Just keep going, adding layers of rust texture and colour. 

 

Just loving the gorgeous layers of texture and colour.
I used several layers of the die cut pipework together to make them thicker and stronger on this side.
Wooohooo – this is soooooo yummy (or is it just me – tee hee).
Another end panel.
I used an MDF keyplate (Powertex) to embellish this end.
The final colouring makes such a difference.
The final side had a couple of little storage wells. I won’t really be using these so a perfect place to embellish with larger items.
I had fun adding recycled light bulbs, screws and bits of chain etc. I used structure paste and Powertex treated kitchen paper as a 3D glue to hold things in place.
Initially I had added a thinner die cut cog to the end but it wasn’t really strong enough. Here I added another thick greyboard cog over the first. Much more practical. I also added a small MDF Butterfly.
Here you can see more of the Steampunk treasures added. I also added some 3D Sand and Balls.
Love this Steampunk birdie peering out.
Well I hope that all these pictures have not overwhelmed you. I wanted to show how all the stages were built up. It also shows the stages that look awful, perhaps where a beginner might give up! Remember, if it all goes wrong just keep applying colour, inks or coloured varnishes. If this fails and you are really not happy – just paint over the whole thing with a base colour of Powertex and start again.
Hugs, Anne xxx.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

The White rabbit’s watch

 
                    If you see the White Rabbit please tell him I’ve found his pocket watch! 


 I’ve used the ivory Powertex to stick and paint my March project pack together and sprinkled on sand and balls to give some amazing texture.
Then I sprinkled some of the black bister crystals onto my work where I wanted some real depth.  I diluted my blue and green bisters and put them into spray bottles I gave everything a really good spray, this diluted the black crystals and it seeped around the textured areas just as I had hoped.
When everything was dry I mixed some rusty powder with some vinegar, sand and ivory Powertex and used an old brush to apply this where I wanted my rust. Over the next 24 hours I resprayed the watch with a vinegar and water mix to reactivate the rusting effect. When I was happy with the rust I left everything to dry and brushed on Powercolor and Colortrix pigments mixed with Easy Varnish to accentuate a few areas and add some metallic elements.

 

 

I hope you like the results!
Thanks for looking, Traceyx