Rusty letter art

The Secret Art Box – August 2019

Designer – Kore Sage

The August Secret Art Box included a personalised initial in mdf, a stencil, papers, a quote stamp and textured fabrics. Also Lead Powertex fabric hardener and colour pigments were in Aqua ink and Blue Bister granules. There was so much in the box to use but I knew straight away that I wanted to use Rusty Powder with the mdf, ink and Bister to create rusty letter art.

Powertex UK secret art box august 2019
Powertex UK Secret Art Box August

Materials list

  • Tag
  • Lead Powertex Fabric Hardener
  • Printed papers
  • Pieces of fabrics
  • Mdf letter
  • Aqua ink spray
  • Bister granules
  • Powercotton

Optional and other supplies

Powertex Rusty Letter wall art
Rusty Letter Art by Kore Sage

1. Make a start

Step 1
Step 1

Laying down the first textures with printed papers and Lead Powertex Fabric Hardener to cover the canvas.

2. Create background textures

Step 2 Easy Structure
Step 2

Use Easy Structure with a plastic palette knife through the stencil. Clean your stencil straight away.

3. Build fabric layers

Step 3 adding fabric with Powertex
Step 3

I added fabric textures to build up a background for the mdf letter. Lead Powertex hardens and adheres the fabric. Use a hairdryer to dry.

4. Add mdf letters and shapes

Step 4 Adding MDF with White Powertex
Step 4

To create depth I used White Powertex to paint and glue the mdf letter and shapes. I painted it lightly over most of the background. Dry with a hairdryer.

TIP: Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener will also work well if you don’t have White.

5. Spray Aqua ink

Step 5 Spray on Aqua Acrylic ink
Step 5

Spray the Aqua ink generously over the textures, let it pool, drip and run off to the side.

6. Add Rusty Powder

Mix up 1 tbsp Transparent Powertex with a little white vinegar and 1/2 – 1 tbsp Rusty Powder. Pour onto the letter, background and fabrics. (It will look grey and the rust will take a few hours to form.)

TIP: For a thicker rust mixture add 3D Sand or Small balls

7. Using Bister granules

Add spots of Transparent Powertex and sprinkle Bister granules onto wet areas. Spray with water and vinegar spray so the colour runs.

TIP: Using white vinegar in the water spray alters the colour of the Bister and encourages the rust.

Step 6 Sprinkle on Blue Bister granules
Step 6 and 7
Step 7 Rusty Powder
Step 6 and 7 rusted

Powercotton vines

Step 8 Powercotton
Step 8

I used Powercotton strands coated with White Powertex to look like vines around the letter.

Brush up highlights

Step 9 White Powertex Highlights
Step 9

White Powertex is dry brushed on highlights over the whole canvas using a flat brush.

Finishing touches

I repeated the Rusty Powder and Bister granules until I was happy with the contrast. Highlighting with White or Ivory Powertex at the end just lifts the letters away from the background. You can layer up as much as you like.

Powertex rusty letter art by Kore Sage
Powertex Rusty Letter Art by Kore Sage

There’s so much left in the Secret Art Box I’ll be making more with these supplies. Tutor Gill has also used this month’s subscription box here.

Keep an eye on The Powertex Studio and my Facebook Page where I’ll be posting my Powertex art. Join us at Powertex Addicts United where you can share your makes.

You can find all the details on the Powertex UK website for your own Powertex subscription box, along with many of these supplies.

Until next time, make some time to let your art out,

Kore x

Moonlit sea with Powertex

Designer – Kore Sage

I’m lucky enough to live a short walk from the sea. I love to visit under the moonlight and listen to the waves. The colours of the water and the beach are so magical under a full moon. The nautical themed mdf was perfect for creating moonlit sea scenes.

The lighthouse had a lovely message in this piece. That no matter how deep the water gets, trust that you will find your way. I hope my plaques inspire you to create your own underwater scenes.

Moonlit sea scene with Powertex and metallic pigments by Kore Sage
Moonlit sea scene by Kore Sage

Metallic pigments for a moonlit night

Metallic pigments are perfect for creating a moonlit glow on my scenes. For the base colour I used Black Powertex on one design and White Powertex on the other.

On this first plaque, I used Black Powertex to paint and adhere layers of mdf with a nautical theme. Stone Art clay was used in the tiny ammonite mould for the little fossils. I also used lumps of the clay for rocks, building dimension and lifting the mdf shapes.

Powertex mixed media detail by Kore Sage
Texture details

Tiny fabric scraps, 3d balls and Powercotton completed the underwater look. I left it to dry before adding the colours.

Pigments were mixed with Easy Varnish and dry brushed over the textures. I use Golden Olive, Violet Valentine and Blue Curacao which made a beautiful moonlit glow.

Powertex moonlit sea plaque by Kore Sage
Moonlit scene

Ivory Powertex and Bister

Powertex Moonlit sea scene
Under the sea scene

My second scene used Ivory Powertex to paint the pieces and adhere it all together. I used tissue paper and cardboard for the back ground. Stone Art clay built up the scene with the mdf shapes. Small, medium 3d balls and sand added extra texture.

Wite Powertex base
White Powertex

When dry I sprayed it heavily with Blue and Black Bister sprays. I used a strong Rust mix and poured this over some of the textures. I sprayed this with a vinegar and water mix.

When that was all dry I chose Aqua Metallic ink and Copper pigment to highlight my textures.

Copper details on Powertex scene
Copper highlights

These watery moonlit sea scenes were really fun to create and will look great hanging in my home. Be inspired and have a try yourself. Do share your makes over on the Facebook group too, we love to see your creations. Or you can tag us on Instagram with #powertexaddict

Powertex mixed media plaques by Kore Sage

If you like the watery theme you might also like this project. You can also find more of my Powertex art at Kore Sage Art. Until next time, find some time to let your art out.

Mixed Media Rusting Techniques

You have probably guessed that we LOVE mixed media rusting techniques. And what better way to achieve these than with rusty powder from Powertex!

You can see some great rusty images here and there have been some excellent articles from our fabulous design team recently.

Here I am sharing the manufacturers instruction sheet with you, have fun and enjoy experimenting!

Keep Powertexing! Tracey x

Mixed Media Rusting techniques
Rusty Powder Techniques

Secret Art Box Love

True Love in a Secret Art Box- Shell North

February is the month of love so what better theme than ‘True Love’ could you have for this months Secret art box? So I decided to mix it up, take on a challenge and embrace my fears. So I am about to share with you some Secret Art Box Love.

In this article I show my first EVER video demo. But I have to admit I took on a more monumental task than anticipated. This is because it took far longer than expected (doesn’t it always when you learn something new). I was stalled by illness and it’s safe to say I came across more than a few technical challenges. This included loosing files so please bear with me!

When I say monumental task, there are 5 demo videos plus the box opening for you too get your teeth into. But you don’t have to watch all the videos at once. Perhaps come back again and view each video another time. Because this is a article on an online magazine you can view at anytime to suit you.

To start off I’ve decided to share opening my box. This is to show everyone a version of what theses delicious box full of goodies can contain.

The video didn’t turn the right way, so I’m off to a great start :D….However I have several video demos. And if you to bear with my first ever videos I’m sure you’ll still pick up lots of tips or cringe with me 🙂

True Love is free

My first Ever demo is called ‘True love is free’. It was my first inspiration upon opening all of the art box contents. I incorporated it with something I found in a charity shop. Unfortunately my memory card became faulty half way through filming. Because of this the parts where I made the leaves , roses, and where I rustied up the cage, cupid and the key are missing.

Heres a collage of the finished piece

Shell North, The Crafty Little Corner, True Love is Free, Secret Art box love.
True Love is Free

Love Notes

My second make with February’s Secret art box goodies was a journal. I named this piece “love notes’. So if journals are your thing this video demo could be right up your street.

Please excuse the fact that the begining of the video was lost due to a corrupt memory card so this is halfway through.

I used a variation of textured wall paper and stenciled images on the MDF hearts using Easy Structure. Next all items were coated and attached using Ivory Powertex fabric hardener. After drying with a hair dryer I then painted the whole journal in Secret art loft Raspberry acrylic Ink.

Here is the finished journal.

Shell North, The Crafty Little Corner, Love Notes, Secret Art Box Love
Love Notes.

Love Actually

Next on my agenda was the Pendant. I called this the ‘Love actually pendant’. Because after editing the video it became apparent that I use the word actually an awful lot (cringe!!!)

…and here is the finished piece

Shell North, The Crafty Little Corner, Love Actually, Secret Art Box Love
Love Actually.

Bee Mine

So I’ve been a busy bee as you can see, oh dear, I now have bees on my mind. My next creation was inspired by the other half heart and the sunflower mould that came in the box.

Once the heart was covered in sunflowers I wanted to incorporate bees for some reason?! I named this one unsuprisingly ‘Bee mine’. This took me further out of my comfort zone, can you guess why? But it may be your thing? Watch and find out!

Here’s my Bee-utiful finished ‘Bee mine’ canvas

Shell North, The Crafty Little Corner, Bee Mine,
Bee Mine

Reflections of love

To finish off the month of love, I came to be inspired for this creation by my partner. We were discussing how busy\stressed I’ve been when I should of been resting. How maybe I need to ‘reflect’ on my needs by not taking on too much. Or taking what could have been a small task and making it a monumental one….now distracted from the said conversation by one word…..Reflect…….yes….my mind pinged with my last creation. Watch now to find out.

Here’s the finished treasure.

Shell North, The Crafty Little Corner, reflections of love, secret art box love
Reflections of Love

Well thats it from me, what a journey this article has been. Despite my reservations I’m glad I faced my fear of videoing and working out of my comfort zone. I hope I’ve inspired you to create something unique. To do something out of your comfort zone with crafting or perhaps inspired you further to order next month’s Secret art box.

If you have any questions from products to techniques. Or you would like to make something similar to the projects in this article. Please don’t hesitate to send me a message at The Crafty Little Corner.

That all from me, List of items with links used right at the end.

Don’t forget to leave a comment.

Peace, love and video blog shenanigans

Shell 🙂

Red Powertex fabric hardenerlead grey Powertex fabric hardenertransparent Powertex fabric hardenerIvory Powertex fabric hardeneryellow ochre Powertex fabric hardenerpolystyrene heartembellishmentsMDF keyAngel cast embellishmentrose mouldsrust powderred ochre powercolor pigmentEasy coat varnishstone art3D flex, MDF hearts, MDF heart flowersMDF journalMDF name plate, Raspberry acrylic ink, white powercolor powder pigmentlipstick fizz SAL powder pigmentTerra-violet colourtrix powder pigmentparty pearls pigment pigment trayviolet valentine SAL pigmentSilver colortrix powder pigmentsunflower moulddaisy mouldspansy mouldsegg yolk acrylic inkpalm leaf acrylic inkvictorian papersEasy coat mattpink flamingo SAL powder pigmentterra-green colortrix powder pigmentbronze gold colortrix powder pigment,  heart rice paper.Edit”True love in a Secret Art Box-Shell North”

Powertex Art Doll Time

Powertex art doll Kore Sage

Powertex Art Doll time on the blog again. These kits are a wonderful project to do if you’re looking to spread your creative wings. The template gives you a starting point with lots of room to try new techniques and ideas. I used a few techniques on my art doll to represent “time flies” but you could just choose the parts you like. That’s the beauty of these kits. Having no rules can be scary like a blank canvas but just try a technique or two that you like and make it yours. Here she is, my Powertex art doll using the small template.

Powertex Art Doll project by Kore Sage
Powertex Art Doll by Kore Sage

Supplies

Powertex small art doll mdf kit
Powertex Small art doll kit

These were the supplies used on this art doll.

Small art doll mdf kit

Powertex Universal Medium in Transparent, Ivory and Black

Rice Paper

Easy Coat Mat

Rusty Powder

Easy Structure

3d Sand and Small balls

Acrylic paints in Red Velvet and Orange Marmalade

Mdf drop outs

Powercotton

Assorted keys from Treasure boxes

Paper fasteners

Getting started

First pop out your Mdf shapes and try some layouts that you like. When you’re settled on a placement, start to prepare your pieces. I tore up a piece of rice paper to roughly fit the body. The theme is “time flies” so I chose a paper with pocket watches on. This fits the rectangular base of the “box”.

Gathering some of my favourite embellishments makes the art doll unique. I added a circle of hessian fabric that was hardened with Black Powertex, to support the plaster face because I wanted to tilt her head. Small wooden shapes add interest and the Mdf drop outs were perfect for this. At this stage I decided I wanted to give her two halves.

Powertex Art Doll arranging pieces by Kore Sage
Laying out the pieces

Powertex art doll time, assemble the pieces

To start, get your pieces together with your chosen Powertex and a flat paintbrush. Apply the pocket watch rice paper to the mdf using Easy Coat Matt. Brush it onto the mdf first and lay the paper on top and gently coat with a brush, from the centre outwards. Easy Coat allows any accidental Powertex to be wiped away from the paper. Transparent Powertex will also work but will be less wipeable.

With Black Powertex, start to assemble your doll by painting and sticking the pieces together. Be careful to turn the base panel so the holes are at the bottom. Layer the “frame” underneath the “box” and do not add the bottom panel. Put the “hooks” into place here with the hooks facing forwards. I waited until the textures had been added but you can do it at this stage. Focus on painting the front first and paint the back when it’s dry. At this stage you can start to see how you can decorate your art doll.

Assembling the art doll by Kore Sage
Assembling the Art Doll

While the doll is drying, it’s a great time to prepare any embellishments with acrylic paint, Black and Ivory powertex. Decorate your pieces how you like but at this stage I’m starting to identify which pieces I want to be coloured and which pieces I’m keeping Black or Ivory. Don’t forget the “leg” pieces too, I prepared these with acrylic paints.

Adding texture

When your doll is touch dry use Easy Structure on a plastic palette knife to add thick texture on the wings and around the sides of the body. Use the paste to hide the hard edges where the “frame” part is used to lift up the box. Create indentations and marks on the wings and sides.

At this point I’m also starting to define the two halves of the doll using Ivory Powertex on the box sides and on the rays around her head. Leave this to dry for several hours as the Easy Structure is quite thick in places.

Powertex Art Doll choosing pieces embellishments Kore Sage
Preparing mdf pieces

Rusty Powder

Rusty Powder adds real rust texture and colour. I wanted a dark rust that would show off layers of the transparent acrylic paints on one side but appear very dark on the other side. The mixture I made is Rusty Powder 50/50 with Transparent Powertex and a little white vinegar. Use 3d sand to thicken the mixture and 3d small balls to add texture. Prepare a spray bottle with white vinegar and water and make sure it has plenty of vinegar for a dark rust, about 40%.

Plastic palette knives are perfect for applying the rusty mixture over the wings, head base (not the plaster) and the sides. Paste a little on the “leg” pieces too for texture and colour. Spray these areas generously with the vinegar and water spray and leave it to rust for a few hours before repeating the process. Doing the same again with a slightly weaker rust mixture will give you different shades of rust although this is optional.

Art Doll with Rusty Powder by Kore Sage
Art Doll Texture with Rusty Powder

Acrylic paints

The Secret Art Loft acrylic paints from Powertex UK are easy to blend and their transparency makes them perfect for this project. I layered Red Velvet and Orange Marmalade paints onto the rusty areas but only on the left side of the doll. This defined the halves and brightened one side. I also painted the left side of the plaster face with Red Velvet paint and left it to dry. You can repeat these steps as often as you need to get the colour you like.

Art Doll Acrylic paint by Kore Sage
Adding Colour with Acrylic paint

The body of the art doll

The body of the doll is the “box” part and this is a great place to get creative, it’s like a mini canvas. Your chosen rice paper might determine the style of embellishments you use. The rice paper is already in place but I wanted to add some details to the body. I had already prepared my embellishments for this but didn’t use everything that I’d chosen. Coat a small wooden heart with Red Velvet paint and use transparent Powertex to adhere some Small balls. Paint it again with red paint when dry. Glue the heart and silver key in place with Transparent Powertex.

Paint some tiny circles from the drop outs pack in Black and Ivory Powertex to match the dark and light sides of the doll. The threads you can see criss-crossing over the doll are threads pulled from some hessian fabric. Cut strands roughly to size, cover them in black Powertex and leave to dry on a plastic mat while checking they are straight.

When dry, use Transparent Powertex to stick these into a criss-cross pattern over the box. After this, use the drop out circles to cover the ends of the threads and create a pattern around the edge. Coat the body and the hooks on the right side of the doll with Ivory. Your doll is coming together nicely but there’s something crucial missing!

Powertex art doll body by Kore Sage
Decorating the Body

The doll’s head

Transparent Powertex is perfect as a glue to keep the plaster face in place, slightly tilted to one side. Cut six chunks of Powercotton into thick pieces about 3 inches long to create the hair. Lay them on a non stick mat and use a paintbrush to carefully push Ivory Powertex into the fibres however try to keep the strands fairly straight and not too tangled! Brush down in the same direction until the Powertex is massaged into the fibres. When it’s well coated, curl the pieces around the head and down the side of the doll keeping lots of texture. You could apply hair to both sides of course but I chose to keep the “halves” of the doll.

When I applied the curls they were starting to fall quite flat so I used some Large 3d balls underneath and in her hair to keep it propped up! I just glued them in place with Transparent Powertex. In addition, this added extra texture and where the balls could be seen they looked like bubbles in her hair!

To add a bit of colour and texture to this side, I brushed her face, hair and small cardboard stars with Ivory Powertex, pushed the stars into her hair and sprinkled a little Rusty Powder over the wet Powertex. I spritzed a quick spray of the vinegar and water mixture to get the rusting started and because the spray is strong I didn’t need to repeat it.

Art Doll Face and Hair by Kore Sage
The Face and Hair

Finishing touches

There’s just a few finishing touches before our doll is ready to display. I’ve already painted the “legs” and given them a rust treatment so now I just paint one leg with Ivory to match the light side. Fit paperfasteners through the holes as “knees” and “hips” for the doll so the legs could hang underneath. Dab black Powertex on the paper fasteners to cover their metallic colour.

The tiny padlock was given the rust treatment earlier and was attached with a little jump ring. I chose tiny keys from the Treasure box which were hung on jump rings and then off the hooks at the bottom. Brush a quick flick of Ivory Powertex to add a highlight to the red side of her face and she’s done!

Art Doll finishing touches by Kore Sage
Art Doll finishing touches

I can really recommend the art dolls if you like a project you can get creative with. The clock is next on my list! The design team members have created their own unique art dolls and you can see them here.

Time flies Powertex art doll

Powertex art doll Kore Sage
Powertex Art Doll by Kore Sage

I hope you enjoyed the art dolls project as much as I have. Join us over on Facebook if you have a Powertex project to share, just pop by Powertex Addicts United and join The Powertex Studio group. We love to see your makes and it’s a great place to get some inspiration or ask questions. You can find out more about me and my art on Facebook at Kore Sage Art.

Rusty Powder

Rusty Powder -February – Powertex Product of the month

This month the team at Powertex Uk have picked rusty powder as their product of the month! Read on to find out how to mix it and see some examples of work with the rust effect created with this product.

How to mix


You can mix the powder with Powertex or Easy Structure and spread with pallet knife or brush. Next you need to spray a mix of water and vinegar on the wet surface. You can then repeat this as much as necessary. Next step is letting your piece dry for 24 hours or longer because this allows the rust process to take place.

How to create a coarse paste

You can obtain a rust paste by mixing Easy Structure with the Rusty Powder and a dash of vinegar. The other thing you can do is mix Powertex with 3DSand, the Powder and a dash of vinegar. This results to a coarser paste and a rough rust effect. 

 

Gorgeous Powertex rust by Tracey Evans
rusty art doll
Rusty Art Doll by Tracey Evans
Close up of texture and rust created with Powertex by Tracey Evans
Powertex and rust by Tracey Evans
DSC00452.JPG
A gorgeous textural canvas by Sam Butler
photo.jpg
Fabulous Steampunk clock by Annette Smyth
thumbnail_20180929_150831.jpg
Beautiful rusty wings canvas
by Shell North @thecraftylittlecorner.co.uk

Fi Potter
by Fi Potter for Mixed Up Creative

We hope you have enjoyed seeing pieces created by the team. Enough so that it inspires you to have a go! Join us over on Facebook in The Powertex Studio and share your makes. Until next time.

Inspiration for an Artwork

Texture inspiration

Where to find Inspiration for an artwork

I am often asked where I get my inspiration for an artwork from. Well mostly the answer is, “it’s all around me”. Because I see inspiration when I’m out for daily walks with my camera. It might be in nature, in architecture, in the many working environment. In the weather, the clouds, a sound, a smell, a texture or a chance conversation. So these are all things that spark ideas in my head which lead me to the creation.

The images below were all taken within 20 minutes of one of these walks. I have worked in my day job for 8 years and never noticed this door before, but the light on that day was so bright that it drew me in. Just look at all that detail in the texture, layers of paint, rust and dust.

A hopper door that has lots of texture, years of dust, rust and layers of colour
Hopper Door – Look at the texture!
Layers of paint, rust and texture in a recessed door handle. Inspiration for an artwork.
Rusty inset door handle

Rusty Inspiration

The detail in this image is perfect for using Powertex Rusty Powder with lead and yellow ochre Powertex to recreate a rusty element.

This measures around 15cm x 10cm on a door that is around 6 meters high.

When you’re out and about be mindful, look out for the detail as well as the bigger picture. You never know what you might find to inspire a new piece of work especially a Powertex project! .

The image on the right is the bottom edge of the door in the first image.

Look at that luscious texture and rust. The tongue and groove in this piece have given me an idea for the base of my next Powertex project, can you guess what it will be?

All three of these images have inspired and will play apart in my March Powertex project.

Bottom edge of door with hinge and rust and lots more texture. Inspiration for an artwork.
Bottom edge of door with hinge and rust
Oak boule with deeply textured bark
Oak Boule with bark

This final image was also captured on the same day and is the deeply textured bark on an oak boule.

For those who don’t know and I didn’t until last year when these started appearing in our timber yard, a boule is the whole tree trunk that is cut into planks.

This too will play a part in my March project.

What will my inspired artwork be?

So have you guessed what my March step by step Powertex project will be? Can you guess what Powertex products I am planning to use to re-create these wonderful textures and colours? If you have an idea then why not leave a comment below. You might think of something I haven’t!

I hope you found some inspiration for an artwork in this article. Keep ‘texing and pop back in March for the finished step by step project. Looking for more inspiration. Do have at my look last project for more inspiration, which you can find here.

Bye for now, Fi

Butterfly dreams of Powertex

Have you noticed an animal theme this month with Abigail’s adorable elephant and Donna’s beautiful afghan hound? Hi it’s Kore here with my August blog. So how about a butterfly? I know, it’s an insect really but it’s a beautiful creature that needs celebrating! I live in a busy city and don’t see too many butterflies but I have lovely memories of Buddleia bushes full of Red Admirals and Peacocks. The wonderful thing about this butterfly is that it can be made with whatever materials you have and what ever size you like for home or garden.

 

Creating the base

Make wings from wire and foil or cut them from thick card. Masking tape is great for covering foil. I made the body from some rolled up foil and taped this too. Rolled up paper would work too. A quick look on the internet for a template was helpful with the shape. Then the Powertex came out!

Using bright Powertex 

I used Red Powertex because I wanted to experiment. There are no rules here. Use what you have to cover the wings and the body pieces. I cut pieces of cotton fabric, massaged in some red Powertex and wrapped these around the body and wings until they were all covered on both sides. It was fun to create lots of texture in the wings and make ragged edges.When the parts were covered I used pieces of fabric in Powertex to attach the wings to the body. I tucked a couple of wire antennae into the body too.

Decorating the butterfly

This where you can get really play with your favourite materials. Use what you have to add texture and colour. I covered the “back” of the wings with a mix of red Powertex and Rusty Powder and small balls. It’s one of my favourite combinations and the red gives the rust a lovely warm glow.

Try this:Spray Bister through stencils or allow it to “puddle” in the texturesSprinkle small balls or sand onto wet PowertexUse Easy Structure to create lines and shapesSprinkle Bister granules onto wet Powertex for little shots of intense colour and textureSplatter acrylic inks and paints

There are so many ways to add colour but I was really happy with using Bister sprays on my butterfly. I chose Red and Yellow and sprayed generously to let the colour run around in the textures. I also used the brown Bister to paint circles onto the back of the wings. I also used some acrylic inks from The Secret Art Loft at Powertex UK. I let Viola ink just run all over it. Let it dry!

Decorate both sides of the wings using your favourite products. The wings are a great place to try something new. This is where it’s fun to have no plan! I really enjoyed just playing and if I didn’t like something I either wiped it off or painted over it!

Final touches

Adding the last highlights is really fun with Powertex. I dry brushed with orange and yellow ochre pigments in Easy Varnish first. I chose to highlight with Ivory Powertex and Limoncello metallic pigment which worked beautifully to add some sparkle.

Then a timely delivery of Metallic gold ink Powertex UK. I couldn’t resist adding some to my butterfly. It’s lush and rich and it’s going to be amazing for some autumn projects! A little on the wings and antennae for a finishing touch.

While I was waiting for one stage to dry, I took the chance to make a couple of tiny butterflies. I printed a couple of butterfly templates from the internet. I glued them onto card so I could cut out two sturdy little butterflies and then painted them with Powertex. I used less texture on these but still applied some rusty texture and then played with acrylic paints and metallic pigment powders.

The acrylic paints were in Blueberry Pie and Orange Marmalade and the pigments in Berry sour and Tequila sunrise. Gorgeous! The puddles of bister on the back of these is wonderful.

 

I think I’ll keep adding different textures and colour to these butterflies. Just when I think I’m done I have an idea to add something else! She’s a big butterfly too. When she’s finished, a coat of varnish (to fix the Bister) and she’ll be a lovely on an outside wall.

After a few days the Powertex will harden and fix your butterfly. In my pictures she’s still new and not hardened so I can move the wings. When you leave your butterfly to set I recommend propping up the wings so they can harden in your preferred position.

So pick out your favourite materials and decorate a butterfly. It’s time to let your art out!

If you would like to see more Powertex creations pop along to The Powertex Studio facebook group where you can share your makes too. Powertex Addicts United on Instagram has lots of inspiration from across the world.

You can also follow my Powertex experiments and projects @skysagestudio on Facebook and Instagram or find my personal Powertex blogs over at koresageart.com.

Until next time,
Kore x

Steampunk Jewellery Plier Stands (by Anne)

I have been meaning to decorate my jewellery plier stands for ages and finally got them finished.
I had a bit of a problem with these in that they started off as a plain varnished wood surface. I initially coated them with white Gesso with a view to painting them with acrylics. However, the Gesso did not bind well to the varnish layer – eek! All ideas were halted. These need to be fairly robust and a tonne of flaky chips after a short use was not what I wanted!
I then discovered Powertex and yay, I would be able to rescue and decorate my plier stands after all. Coating the entire surface with rice papers and torn kitchen towels would create a tough protective skin over the surface and prevent the feared chipping off of the base layers.
HOW IT WAS DONE
I first collected together lots of embellishments; die cut cogs and pipework (Sizzix dies), MDF Keyplate (Powertex), metal clock hand and chains, old light bulbs and screws.
I tore out images from Creative Rice Paper (Powertex). This particular sheet seems to be out of stock but there is a similar Victorian Steampunk Paper available. I also separated layers of kitchen paper and tore them into pieces to coat the surface. This would add texture and a protective layer.
STAGE ONE
First I applied the torn decorative papers using Easy Coat Mat Medium. Ivory Powertexwas then painted on to blend in the image edges.
STAGE TWO
Next layers of kitchen paper were bonded all over the surface. Some were glued down with Ivory and some with Terracotta Powertex. Die cut card embellishments were also coated with Powertex and glued down.
Texture was added by applying Easy Structure Pastethrough a texture stencil.
I also had a try at the rust technique. I mixed some Rusty Powder into Ivory Powertex along with a few drops of white wine vinegar. This was painted and dribbled over the surface (extra powder sprinkled on top) and spritzed with water and vinegar before leaving overnight to develop. I spritzed at intervals, several times. I avoided the areas that will be in contact with my pliers.
STAGE THREE
Next I brushed over and added colour using Acrylic Inks in Tangerine, Egg Yolk, Aqua and Metallic Gold.
STAGE FOUR
I also applied a little gold Pebeo Gilding Wax on some areas. When fully dry and cured (I left them for 3 weeks) I coated the surface with Easy Varnish to fully seal and protect.
I have included lots of images of how all the surfaces were built up.
Texture and die cut cogs have been added.
Rust and colour added.
Side finished with stronger thick greyboard embellishments. Any large embellishments protruding from edges need to be strong (thinner card would be prone to warp and bend).
I started with a larger clock image on the other side.
Die cuts and texture added plus a metal clock hand for dimension.
Finally finished with thicker embellishments and more dry brush work and gilding wax.
Love this character.
Texture and layers built up. Waiting for the rust to develop.
Building up the layers of transparent colour makes so much difference.
The second plier stand started off in the same way.
At this stage you might feel like giving up. What a mess!
Just keep going, adding layers of rust texture and colour. 

 

Just loving the gorgeous layers of texture and colour.
I used several layers of the die cut pipework together to make them thicker and stronger on this side.
Wooohooo – this is soooooo yummy (or is it just me – tee hee).
Another end panel.
I used an MDF keyplate (Powertex) to embellish this end.
The final colouring makes such a difference.
The final side had a couple of little storage wells. I won’t really be using these so a perfect place to embellish with larger items.
I had fun adding recycled light bulbs, screws and bits of chain etc. I used structure paste and Powertex treated kitchen paper as a 3D glue to hold things in place.
Initially I had added a thinner die cut cog to the end but it wasn’t really strong enough. Here I added another thick greyboard cog over the first. Much more practical. I also added a small MDF Butterfly.
Here you can see more of the Steampunk treasures added. I also added some 3D Sand and Balls.
Love this Steampunk birdie peering out.
Well I hope that all these pictures have not overwhelmed you. I wanted to show how all the stages were built up. It also shows the stages that look awful, perhaps where a beginner might give up! Remember, if it all goes wrong just keep applying colour, inks or coloured varnishes. If this fails and you are really not happy – just paint over the whole thing with a base colour of Powertex and start again.
Hugs, Anne xxx.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

The White rabbit’s watch

 
                    If you see the White Rabbit please tell him I’ve found his pocket watch! 


 I’ve used the ivory Powertex to stick and paint my March project pack together and sprinkled on sand and balls to give some amazing texture.
Then I sprinkled some of the black bister crystals onto my work where I wanted some real depth.  I diluted my blue and green bisters and put them into spray bottles I gave everything a really good spray, this diluted the black crystals and it seeped around the textured areas just as I had hoped.
When everything was dry I mixed some rusty powder with some vinegar, sand and ivory Powertex and used an old brush to apply this where I wanted my rust. Over the next 24 hours I resprayed the watch with a vinegar and water mix to reactivate the rusting effect. When I was happy with the rust I left everything to dry and brushed on Powercolor and Colortrix pigments mixed with Easy Varnish to accentuate a few areas and add some metallic elements.

 

 

I hope you like the results!
Thanks for looking, Traceyx