If Medusa could Stone Art you

Designer – Shell North

For my July article we are delving into ancient Rome and looking at incorporating Medusa and Stone Art. The Romans were renowned for their love of wine, both producing it and drinking it. So a wine Medusa jug is what I will teach you to make this time.

Medusa was a Gorgon and one of the most frequently repeated motifs in Greek and later, in Roman antiquities. The Legend has it that if you were to gaze into her eyes you would turn to stone. Or in our case…Stone art!

Powertex Stone Art Medusa jug by Shell North

Materials List

Powertex materials list for Medusa jug
Powertex item list

How to make a Stone Art Medusa jug

Make some Stone Art clay

To start I mixed my own colour using the Bronze, Lead and Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener to make my own shade of stone art clay. I mixed it with equal parts Stone Art powder to make the clay.

Mixing Powertex

TOP TIP Leave some of the Powertex mix aside before mixing in the Stone Art powder as you will need some for the cotton later.

Making the jug shape

Insert the bottle into the large yoghurt pot, add foil to create shape and cover in masking tape. Shape foil to create a handle and tape as above.

Make the jug shape with foil

The messy fun bit

Using the Stone Art clay, smooth pieces over the base little by little until covered. Shape a spout as desired with the Stone Art clay.

Add Stone Art clay

Adding the motif

Cover the back of your plaster face with a little Stone Art clay and smooth around the edges into position.

Plaster face
Use a plaster face

Creating the deadly snake hair

To create Medusa’s hair use some tiny strips of cotton and work them into the Powertex Fabric Hardener colour mix you made earlier.

Making fabric snake hair
Making snake hair

Creating moving hair

Using the wet strands, apply one by one in a wiggly position, over lapping and layering to create movement like living snakes!

Snake hair Medusa
Medusa

To finish

Dry brush lighter shades of Grey and Red ochre Powercolor pigments and Easy Varnish, finishing with lighter colours last to give a worn/aged appearance.

Powertex Stone Art Medusa jug by Shell North
Powertex Medusa jug by Shell North

Handy tip

TOP TIP To get even coverage with stone art, why not use a pasta machine to roll out your clay all in one equally level sheet. I have found many cheap second hand ones for £5 in charity shops! Just make sure your clay is not sticky before rolling through.

Did you see Kore’s planet canvas recently? I was hugely inspired by it so if you missed it, find it here and you too may find inspiration.

Hope you enjoyed this article? If so please comment below or share your inspiration on the Facebook Powertex Studio page.

Well that’s all for me this month,

Peace, love and a little splash of wine from my jug 😉

Shell xxx

Roman Column

Designer – Patricia Williams

As the theme for this month is the Roman Empire, for this article my thoughts turned to all those wonderful columns. They are quite majestic as they tower above us reaching for the sky. Before I started work on my project, I researched styles so I could get a feel for where I was heading.

Roman Column with Powertex by Patricia Williams Alex Henry
Powertex Roman Column

Materials list

Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener

Stone Art

Brown Bister

Yellow ochre Powertex Fabric Hardener

Corrugated cardboard

MDF or wood squares

Building My Column

Corrugated card column

I started by rolling my corrugated cardboard to size. Use a former underneath if you wish. The centre of a large tin foil would do to give it a bit of strength. Glue firmly together using Powertex Fabrc Hardener and leave to dry.

Add Stone Art

I gave my column a good covering of Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener and rubbed in a generous layer of Stone Art. I left it to settle while doing the same for the top and bottom of my Column. Repeating this stage a second time made sure it was well covered. 

Cover the card with Powertex and Stone Art

Spray with Bister

I finished by spraying generously with Brown Bister. This did give it a lovely look of worn stone. I left it all to dry overnight.

The Finishing Touches

I started to work on my decoration, I made scrolls from the corrugated cardboard I had used for the main structure, this worked well and added that extra touch.  I used the same technique of coating with Powertex and rubbing in Stone Art, attaching these to the column with a dab of Ivory Powertex.

Happy with that it was now onto dry brushing,  I decided to keep it simple and dry brush with Yellow Ochre and Ivory Powertex.

Powertex Roman Column with Stone Art
Powertex Roman Column by Patricia Wiliams

I am pleased with the result, what do you think? Would look great just standing in a corner of the garden or as a plinth for another one of your Powertex creations, its nice to elevate pieces of work to create layers and depths to a display.

I would love to see some of your makes so why not show them on The Powertex Studio. Also, if you would like to see more of my work pop over to Alex Henry on FB. I work in a wide variety of styles.

There are also lots of other fabulous articles on the Powertex Magazine, be sure to check them out they make very good reading and fill you with inspiration.

Thank you for reading I will be back again with more articles,

Patricia

Roman Chalice in Powertex

Designer – Jinny Holt

Our theme for this month was Roman Empire/Julius Caesar. I wanted to do a lot from this theme but I decided to make a Powertex Roman chalice.

I searched online for some ideas and already had a large brandy type glass, that I knew would be perfect for this article.

Did you know…

July is the seventh month of the year and the fourth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. It was named by the Roman Senate in honour of Roman general Julius Caesar, it being the month of his birth. Prior to that, it was called Quintilis, being the fifth month of the 10-month calendar.

How I made my Roman Chalice

Materials list

Powertex supplies
Items used for Roman Chalice

Prepare the glass

I started by using masking tape to cover the glass.

TOP TIP This is the best way to prepare the surface when using glass or plastic items.

Cover glass with Masking tape before using Powertex
Masking tape is your friend

Add fabric and clay

I dipped lace and material into IVORY POWERTEX Fabric Hardener and added to my glass. I used air dry clay to make mouldings as they reminded me of Roman shapes.

TIP… You could always mix Powertex Fabric Hardener with STONE ART to make your own clay.

Add fabric and clay textures
Fabric and clay textures

Coat the surface

Next I coated the whole piece with Ivory Powertex and rubbed in the Stone Art and let dry.

Remove the excess

I rubbed off any excess Stone Art with my hands.

Remove excess Stone Art
Stone Art applied

Paint the surface

I painted the whole thing with BLACK POWERCOLOR mixed with Easy Varnish and let it dry.

Add highlights

Mix a dry paint with Easy Varnish and SILVER Colortricx powder pigment and dry brush to add highlights.

Dry brush with Silver pigment
Chalice fit for any Emperor

Here’s a close up of my Roman Chalice.

Close up of Roman Chalice with Powertex

I hope you have enjoyed seeing how I accomplished this project. If you have been inspired by mine or any of my fellow design team members, you could always come and say hello on the THE POWERTEX STUDIO. Don’t be shy to upload any photos of projects you have created too.

You can get all your Powertex goodies at POWERTEX UK.

I post all my other creations at MUMS SHED on Facebook. Find Powertex on PINTEREST and INSTAGRAM too.

So until next time.

~LIVE~LOVE~LAUGH~CREATE~

Jinny

Mosaic Madness

Designer – Annette Smyth

Hello Everyone, this month’s theme of Ancient Rome has got me really excited.

Why I hear you ask?…….Well, my Dad was born in the village of North Leigh in Oxfordshire.  It is here that the remains of one of the largest Roman villas can be found.  At its height, around the early 4th century it had 4 bath suites, 16 mosaic floors and 11 rooms with underfloor heating.  I expect the inhabitants found our climate a little cool!  

Mosaic madness

It was the mosaic floors that really grabbed my imagination and so I did a bit more digging into their symbolic meaning.  I found that homes often had a mosaic with medusa in. This was considered a lucky talisman as  it was thought to ward off evil,  as her stare would turn the viewer to stone.

Powertex Mosaic Madness by Annette Smyth

I immediately thought of using stone art to create the tiles and rather than Medusa I chose to use the Green man plaster , a more gentle image. The piece needed to be rustic and aged so bister was the perfect choice and having missing and misplaced tiles around the edge also gives it a timeworn feel.

If you would like to read more about the history of the villa please click here.

Materials List

Mdf circle or old hardboard place mat – mine was 28cm wide
Ivory Powertex Universal Medium
Stone Art
Green Man Plaster face
Brown Bister
Colortricx pigments – Red Ochre, Yellow Ochre, White, Mocha, Ultramarine blue
Easy Varnish
Powerwax (can be replaced with Stone Art see step 12)

You will also need
Non stick rolling pin
2 pieces of wood to be used as guides for rolling out your clay in step 2 – mine were just under 1cm thick 

1 Make Stone Art clay

Make the Stone Art clay by mixing the Ivory Powertex with the Stone Art.

2 Roll out the clay

Using the wooden guides, roll out the clay on a non stick surface.

Using guides allows you to roll to the same depth each time.

Texture added with sponge

3 Adding texture

Using a texture sponge, press into the clay to create texture then cut up into 1cm squares with scissors.

4 Dry enough tiles

Place these tiles to one side to start to dry.  I used 122 on my piece.

Designer tip – make spare tiles to test dry brushing colours on later.

5 Paint the base

Paint both sides of your base with Ivory Powertex and dry.

Place the plaster face on the base and roughly draw around it.

6 Make up your “grout”

Make up a paste of Stone Art powder and Ivory Powertex.  Think of this as your grout.

7 Attach the plaster face

Place some paste inside the line for your plaster face, paint the back of the plaster with Ivory Powertex and then place onto the base.

8 Place your tiles

Spread out more of paste, in a thickish layer, around the face and start placing your tiles in your chosen pattern.  

Mosaic sprayed with Bister

9 Spray with Bister

Spray with a light misting of brown bister and leave to dry overnight.

10 Add colour to the face

With a damp sponge, remove excess bister.

Using the Red and Yellow Ochre pigments mixed with Easy Varnish colour the plaster face.

Add Ultramarine Blue to the eyes.

Dry brushing the tiles

11 Colour the tiles

Using the Red Ochre, Yellow Ochre and Mocha pigments with Easy Varnish I coloured the outside 2 circles of tiles.

12 Colour the grout

Using Powerwax mixed with Yellow Ochre I created a paste to fill in the gaps between the tiles and up to the plaster.  Remove excess with a damp sponge.

Allow to dry overnight and polish with a soft cloth.

Top tip

Why not try using the Stone Art paste mixed with Yellow Ochre if you don’t have any Powerwax.

I have really enjoyed creating this piece and can see so many more projects that would work well with this technique. How about making your own plaque with your house number on?

I would love to know what you create following this article. Why not share your creations on the Powertex Studio Facebook group.

If you would like to see more inspiration ideas why not have a look at my previous article or join me for a workshop at my home studio.

Until next time, Happy Creative Adventures………Axx

The Northern Lights in Powertex

Aurora Borealis in Powertex
Northern Lights using Powertex

Designer: Donna Mcghie

In this article I will show you how to recreate my interpretation of the Northern Lights using Powertex.

The Northern Lights, or Aurora Borealis have always fascinated me. Like the ocean which was the inspiration for my last blog, they have that ethereal, slightly unworldly quality. They are a reminder of just how wonderful nature can be.

The lovely Tracey Evans at Powertex HQ asked if I could use lots of colour and texture in this article. I used the gorgeous pigments to create the fluorescent greens and pinks for the sky. Textured stone art clay was added to signify water.

One thing I hadn’t realised before doing some research for this article, is that the Northern Lights also occur during the daytime.  However the human eye is unable to see them at these times as the sun is too strong for them to show up.

Materials List:

Cover the canvas

Powertex base for Northern Lights Blog
I mixed Sherbert Dip Pigment with White Fabric Hardener to create a luminous base

I roughly covered my canvas using a mixture of Sherbert Dip Pigment and White Powertex for the sky, and White and Blue Powertex for the sea.

Create crackles

Northern lights sky created using powertex pigments
I also added some Violet Valentine to the sky

After spraying with Black Bister I blasted with a hair dryer to create crackles, and used a palette knife to scrape back and allow the yellows to shine through.

Stone Art sea

Powertex Clay added to canvas for Northern Lights Blog
I had added in some trees in the background here, but they didn’t look right so I faded them out using my pigments over the top.

I used segments of Stone Art clay to create the illusion of a choppy sea. Powertex pearl pigments reflect the colours in the sky.

Tree textures

Powertex acrylic ink used to create trees on canvas
Rather than having the trees all along the shoreline, which didn’t look right, I opted to use an asymmetrical composition instead.

Putting a cluster of trees fading downwards, I painted some corrugated cardboard with acrylic and used a stubby brush to indicate branches.

Highlight waves

Powertex Power Wax to give highlights to waves on Stone Art Clay
Make Stone Art clay by mixing a small quantity of Stone Art with some Powertex until it forms a dough like substance

I liked the way the Stone Art clay waves were curling and decided to highlight this using Powercolor Titanium White Pigment.

Powerwax sky

I used Powertex Powerwax for a deep shine on the canvas
Powerwax is perfect for adding extra depth and shine.

Finally I added some extra depth to the colours in the sky using Powerwax and pigment. I dip my finger in the wax, then the pigment and gently rub on in a circular movement.

Using the Powerwax in the final stage really helped to bring the picture to life. I was able to create beautiful swirling patterns in the sky using the amazingly vibrant Pearl Pigments which gave just the ethereal atmosphere I was hoping for.

Northern Lights in Powertex

My finished Northern Lights Powertex Canvas

That’s all from me for this month. I hope you have enjoyed this step by step article, and would love to see any Northern Lights inspired artwork you create over on our Facebook page. Please feel free to leave any comments, (especially nice ones).

If you are in the Southampton area and fancy coming along to a workshop you can find all my upcoming events on the blog section of www.artandmurals.co.uk. My Facebook page also has my events listed.

Take care, and see you next month 🙂

Star dreaming inspiration

By Annette Smyth

Hello everyone. I wonder, is there such a thing as star dreaming?

I hope you are having lots of adventures in this lovely weather we are currently experiencing. One of the things I love at this time of year is being able to sit out in the warm evenings under clear skies and let my mind wander.

Star dreaming

When we look upwards with the naked eye, we can only see spots of light on a dark background. But what is really out there? Thanks to a very talented member of our family, I was able to get access to some amazing shots using astrophotography. This allowed me to get a more detailed view.

Barry Porteous has kindly allowed me to share some of his amazing work with you here. I think these images are just perfect inspiration for Powertex canvas projects. See the images below with my suggestions for the products you could use to recreate them as wall art.

Inspiration

Lunar eclipse

Lunar eclipse Powertex inspiration
Lunar eclipse by Barry Porteous

For this Powertex project – A canvas covered in Black Powertex Universal Medium with a White Powertex circle. Add Stone Art in a circle to give texture. Use Mahogany bister, Easy Varnish and white and red Powercolor to create the deep red colours.

3 day old moon

3 day old moon Powertex inspiration
3 day old moon by Barry Porteous

This Powertex project use Black Powertex Univeral Medium for the background and Ivory for the moon. Mix 3D Sand into a paste for texture. Yellow bister, White and Yellow Ochre Powercolor can be used to create these yellow colours. Mix your pigments with Easy Varnish to make a paint.

Constellation of Cygnus – The Crescent Nebula (5000 light years away)

Star dreaming inspiration
Constellation of Cygnus – the crescent nebula by Barry Porteous

Horsehead and flame nebula and the Leo triplet of galaxies

Star dreaming inspiration

Horsehead and flame nebula by Barry Porteous

Constellation of Cygnus – North American Nebula

Powertex canvas inspiration
Constellation of Cygnus – North American Nebula by Barry Porteous

Recreating Nebula images with Powertex

These Nebula images could all be recreated with Black Powertex Universal Medium for the background. Use Easy Varnish, White and Red Powercolor (dry brushed, splattered and painted for different effects.

I hope you have enjoyed these images and that you are inspired to create your own starscapes. Why not share your creations on the Powertex Studio Facebook group.

If you would like to see more inspiration ideas why not have a look at my previous article or join me for a workshop at my home studio.

Until next time, Happy Creative Adventures………Axx

Upcycled Powertex pot

Designed by – Anna Emelia Howlett

Upcycled Powertex Pot by Anna Howlett

If you saw my shows with Powertex UK on HOCHANDA on May 3rd at 12pm and 4pm you would have caught my water pot. Made from my mum’s giant yoghurt pot I felt it was only fair to gift it to her. I hope you felt inspired to make your own upcycled powertex pot. Here are some tips and a materials list for how I made mine.

Materials

Stone art clay ammonite fossils
All pearl pigments from the party pearls pigment tray were used on the fossils to make them pop.

What to use to create an upcycled Powertex pot

Don’t forget Powertex can do many things. It acts like a primer, glue and paint. It will harden most fabrics and textiles. If you would like them to be water resistant you need to use fibres with at least 80% cotton in them, then cure for 3 weeks. For my upcycled Powertex pot I used black Powertex fabric hardener on different fabrics and textiles to cover the pot. Coated the mdf starfish with a mixture of black Powertex, 3d sand and balls. I created some stone art clay, pressed into the new super cute fossil moulds and stuck down with Powertex.

Dry brushing with White Powertex
Dry brush white Powertex on the black Powertex to pick out the detail.

How to make your pearl pigments pop

Leave your black base layer to harden by leaving to dry, either in the air or with a hair dryer. Then use the new White Powertex to dry brush over the top because this helps to bring out all the texture in the materials. It also gives a base for your colours to lie on top of. The pearl pigments are translucent and this technique allows them to show up and pop on a black base. This is because you’ve put the white layer down over the black.

Using pearl pigments to highlight
Pearl pigments

Share your upcycled Powertex pot with us

These make super water pots or plant pots. Why not give it a go! And don’t forget to share your makes in The Powertex studio, I love knowing I’ve inspired you to create your own works of art. Please leave a me a note in the comments if you have found this article useful. You can find me at Rosehart Studio. You might also be interested in my mixed media canvas project. Toodles Anna xXx

Upcycled Powertex Pot by Anna Howlett

The sea is my heart, a Powertex octopus

Designer – Shell North

A Powertex octopus. The theme this month is Underwater, this is one of my favourite go to themes I love to create with as I love the sea. Living in Dorset I’m close to the sea and often find myself seeking respite on some of the peaceful secluded beach spots I know of. There are so many interesting aspects of the sea I get inspiration from, the creatures, colours, sounds and textures.

One of my favourite sea creatures are octopuses, they are such interesting creatures, incredibly intelligent and majestic.

So then, it’s decided that in this article I will be creating an octopus sculpture. I chose to work with both fabric and Stone Art clay to get the look I wanted.

Powertex Octopus sculpture by Shell North
Powertex Octopus Sculpture by Shell North

Materials used in my Powertex octopus

Supplies for Powertex octopus
Supplies

Tools

Skill level

Intermediate due to size

Creating the body shape

  • Using wire mesh, create a balloon shape with a skirt, stuff with waste materials (like used gloves) then cover in foil, then cover in masking tape.
Create the body shape
Step 1 Create the body shape

Making the tentacles

  • Wrap 8 lengths of wire in foil until the right thickness for tentacles and then place around main body. Cover and secure with masking tape and curl into shape.
Adding tentacles with wire and foil
Step 2 Add tentacles

Making the eyes

  • Cut the polystyrene ball to make the shape of an octopus eye, attach the eye with hot glue and again to attach to the body.
Craft octopus eyes with polystyrene and plastic craft eyes
Step 3 Add eyes

Covering with stone art clay

  • Roll out the Stone Art clay to 5mm thick, dampen with water and firm in place over the sculpture. Use a pallet knife and a little water to blend any joins.

Adding fabric for the web area

  • Using strips of jersey cotton, work in the Powertex Universal Medium and attach the fabric like a skirt around the mantle. Blend the edges.
Blend the edges of the fabric with the clay
Blend the edges of fabric and clay

To finish the project

While the clay is still wet use the texture sponge to create a texture on the surface of the clay.

Dry brushing

Leave to dry a few hours, then mix powder pigments of your choice with easy varnish and dry brush colour onto your sculpture.

Powertex Octopus sculpture by Shell North
And here’s the finished Powertex Octopus by Shell North

I will probably add suckers on the underneath of the tentacles at a later time, but due to its size over ran with the time allocated (1.5 days).

Top tip

When shaping the tentacles I sat the octopus sculpture on top of the up-turned 250g stone art tub so I could give the tentacles more movement instead of them being flat.

Did you know?

Octopuses have 3 hearts? Really does make them the heart of the sea!

Well I hope you enjoyed my article this month. If you’re inspired to sculpt with Stone Art clay, catch my Powertex bird sculpture article from Jan.

Well that’s all from me until next month,

Peace, love and octopus hugs,

Shell x

The Secret Art Box – May

A Home Under the Sea

Designer – Jill Cullum

A home under the sea Powertex canvas by Jill Cullum
A home under the sea by Jill Cullum

I was so excited to receive my first ‘Secret Art Box’, and I was not disappointed when I opened it.  Full of possibilities to create this article with.  It’s a challenge of being given a box of ‘goodies’ and then creating out of my comfort zone.

Materials List

Inside the art box was a cute fish. I was in my element as my last article was based around my love of the beach. I wanted a different style this time, so with several possibilities in mind, I chose a canvas as my base.

Detail of Powertex canvas

The secret art box fish

Not content with one super cute fish, I wanted two!  With a sharp knife and careful cutting, I sliced the fish in half.  Using the reverse of the canvas I covered the top half with the nautical paper, using Easycoat Matt.  The bottom half cried out for some stone art and brown Bister. 

Powertex Secret Art Box May fish under the sea theme
Fish and clay details

The sea bed was created by adding texture with stone balls, material and clay pieces. The adorable mini ammonite moulds as well as the shell mould in the ‘Secret Art Box’ made the clay shapes.  The fish needed lots of lovely texture, you can really go to town with this, especially when adding colour.  Terragreen pigment works a treat for this theme. 

I love the way things develop as your creative piece comes together and I didn’t really have a picture of the finished piece in mind. It just happened along the way.  I hope you like it and feel inspired to create your own ‘home in the sea’.

Secret Art Box May is a Home under the sea Powertex canvas
Home under the sea detail

For more sea themed inspiration take a look at my last blog here.

I am looking forward to seeing your pieces of art, using the May ‘Secret Art Box’. Please share them at The Powertex Studio on Facebook.

Secret Art Box May Powertex project by Jill Cullum
Finished mixed media canvas by Jill Cullum

A little teaser of my next blog, which will take us from the sea, into the sky! Bye for now, Jill x

Under The Sea Powertex Sculptures

Powertex shark by Donna Mcgghie

By Donna Mcghie

What lies under the sea can be both beautiful and terrifying in equal measure.

I decided to make my own homage to the 1970’s film Jaws for my first underwater sculpture for this article. Thanks to this film I always feel a primeval sense of unease when swimming in deep water, and that music hovers around at the back of my brain. However at the same time I also have an exhilarating rush of adrenaline. My senses feel alert and vibrant. 

Under the sea, Powertex shark by Donna Mcghie
Although I am scared of sharks, I have grown rather fond of this gnarly old Powertex king of the seas

Powertex Stone art mixed with black Powertex fabric hardener was the perfect medium for this gnarled, battle scarred shark.

Powertex zip mouth on shark
An old zip works perfectly for his pointy little teeth
Powertex shark on base
The black metal base makes the perfect base for this powertex sculpture

The sea bed can be an eerily beautiful setting. Mixed media was used to create this under water 3D canvas.

The eerily beautiful seabed that is home to my shark

The illusion of the sea was created by using a mixture of blue and white Powertex Fabric Hardener sprayed with blue bister. I created the spiky coral by soaking Powercotton in transparent Powertex fabric hardener. Shells that are not conventionally pretty added the finishing touch.

Beware of Beautiful Powertex Mermaids

Powertex mermaid by Donna Mcghie
I used bits of lace and paperdecoration to add texture

Many legends and myths are connected to the sea. One of the most enduring myths is that of the mermaid.

My mermaid canvas was created by swirling blue and white Powertex fabric hardener onto a canvas. Bister was then added and blasted with a hair dryer.

My mermaid started to take shape when I poured green Powertex fabric hardener to create the shape of a tail.

I mixed Powertex terracotta and white fabric hardeners together to create a flesh tone, whilst Yellow ochre fabric hardener worked well for the hair.

Davy Jones’s Locker

There are many versions of who Davy Jones was, and just as many theories as to just how he ended up lurking at the bottom of the sea.

Maybe he was seduced by the beauty of a passing mermaid. Her beauty having lured him down to the murky depths below.

Powertex under the sea
My Davy Jones sports a jacket I spied in a charity shop, soaked in Bronze Powertex Fabric Hardener

Our facebook page The Powertex Studio is a great place for ideas and motivation. You can also inspire others by sharing your own makes.

You can also see more of my work and find out about my workshops on my website www.artandmurals.co.uk.

My last month’s blog was inspired by the artist Vincent Van Gogh

That’s all for now. As this is an inspiration blog I have not done step by steps, but if you would like more detailed instructions I am happy to provide them. Please leave me a comment below if you like what you see, and remember to take care, especially when swimming in deep water.

After all, you never know what is lurking beneath.