Powertex Dog from recycled items

Designer – Jill Cullum

Powertex is at it’s best when used to upcycle/recycle items we would normally pop in the bin. It is perfect for transforming everyday objects into a sculpture, either for the house or garden.

Powertex 3d animal dog from recycling
Powertex dog by Jill Cullum

When I was asked to make a 3d animal from recycled materials, I began saving all sorts of items that would normally have been thrown out. Unfortunately when I came to start the project Karl had tidied up and thrown it all out! A visit to the loft was called for where I found an old hearth brush. Perfect for a tail – and just the job for a dog.

Animals are not something I make very often, but once started I enjoyed the process. As usual, I learnt quite a lot whilst making this project and am already looking forward to making more.

Materials List

Let’s Create a Dog

Gather your items to make the shape

Materials for a powertex dog
Step 1

After I took the photograph of all my pieces ready to upcycle, I added some old table stands which were ideal to use for legs.

Building the main body structure

building the dog structure from recycling
Step 2

Using masking tape, secure the legs to the hearth brush. Add the pie dishes over the side, using paper/bubble wrap to pad them out.

Adding detail

corrugated card ears
Step 3

Cut some ear shapes and feet, out of corrugated cardboard. Put these to one side.

Eyes

eyes from jar lids
Step 4

Cover the jar lids with masking tape, forming texture as you do this by crumpling it as you press it down.

Putting him all together

Step 5

Secure the eyes and ears to the main body. Cover the whole animal in masking tape. Leaving the ‘tail’ untouched.

Adding the fur

decorating the recycled items with powertex
Step 6

Using Powertex and material of your choice, cover the structure, creating texture for the coat of the dog. Using Powercolour dry-brush your dog.

Finishing touches

I also just had to add some googly eyes to give him some character. He still didn’t look finished so added a piece of lace using red Powertex, to create a tongue.

I hope you have enjoyed this article and it has inspired you to create your own animals. It is good to recycle and as crafters we have lots of items we can use.

Abigail Lagden has a great blog on how to use up old paint brushes to create a lion sculpture.

Let us see what you make by posting them over on the Powertex Studio. Bye for now. Jill x

Initial Star Plaque

The Secret Art Box – August 2019
Designer – Gill Goldsmith

The August Secret Art Box arrived and I was excited to unpack it and see what was inside this month. Again I wasn’t disappointed with the amount of contents…gorgeous papers, stamps, a bundle of letters, fabric textures, MDF tags, blue bister granules, aqua acrylic ink, Lead Powertex (which we haven’t had before) and the most gorgeous MDF Initial (everyone got one specially cut for them) so mine was a G. I use mine to create an Initial Star Plaque.

Powertex Secret Art Box August 2019
Powertex UK Secret Art Box August 2019

I wanted to showcase the big letter G, as well as some of the other products and so decided to use a star canvas panel I had as a start.

Initial star plaque with Powertex. Powertex star canvas by Gill Goldsmith
Initial Star art by Gill Goldsmith

Materials

The Secret Art Box – August 2019

Additional Materials

How to create your Initial Star Plaque

Apply texture

Lay out papers and use stencil for texture
Step 1

I used the manuscript paper, which I tore into strips and attached to the canvas using Easycoat Mat, which is a glue and sealant.

Next I added random areas of text with the stencil and Easy Structure applied with a palette knife. Allow this to dry.

Add Stone Art clay

Using manuscript papers from Powertex UK
Step 2

I had some black Powertex left over from another project. Using Stone Art I made up some stone art clay and applied it in just two areas.

To create more texture I used the word stamp included in the box and imprinted this into the clay whilst it was still soft.

Paint with Powertex Lead

Use Powertex in Lead grey to paint some ares of the canvas
Step 3

I painted in all the areas I wanted to be covered in the Lead Powertex and you can see that I left some areas, where the script paper had been applied, free from colour.

Add fabric and mdf

Add mdf shapes and initial
Step 4

Now to start playing with all the lovely textures including in the Box. I added some mesh, hessian and stockinette across the centre of the piece, which was the perfect place to sit my MDF Initial G.

I also added the cherub and the ART letters to the bottom right point of the star. All of the material and MDF is covered in Lead Powertex and then allowed to dry thoroughly.

Bister spray

Spray with Blue BIster. Initial Star plaque with mdf initial
Step 5

Now for the fun bit… spray the canvas with the blue bister. Mix up the granules with water in the empty spray bottle, which gives the perfect consistency.

The more you spray the more detail will be brought out in the dry brushing stage, so don’t be shy. Allow this to dry.

Acrylic ink spray

Use Powertex Secret Art Loft acrylic inks
Step 6

This month to complete the colour scheme we are working with Aqua, a gorgeous blue colour. Again don’t be shy, spray liberally, but again you will see I have left some of the script clear. This is sealed with the Easycoat mat. I didn’t want too much colour on these parts, so if you do cover it my accident you can wipe it back with kitchen roll.

Finishing touches

Here is my final piece. Mix a small amount of your favourite metallic pigment with Easy varnish and then wipe the excess onto kitchen roll. Stroke your brush across the surface of your work to catch the colour on the highlights.

Powertex UK Secret Art Box August Initial Star Plaque. Initial Canvas by Gill Goldsmith
Finished Star Initial Canvas by Gill Goldsmith

This piece is now hanging in my home studio and is a really unique and personal piece of art. I have lots more items left in my Secret Art Box that I haven’t used, so keep an eye on the subscribers Facebook page for another project in the next few weeks. My last Secret Art Box project was a Venetian Mask Canvas which is also here in the Magazine.

I hope this initial star plaque has inspired you to create with your Initial this month. Please don’t be shy and share your makes on the Secret Art Box subscribers Facebook page, we love to see what you create.

You can find me on Facebook at The Powertex Port.
Until next month, Happy Powertexing..

Gill xxx

Powertex Giraffe

Unique Powertex giraffe garden feature

Designer – Donna Mcghie

For this article I was asked to create a 3D animal using Powertex and recycled materials.  As anyone who is familiar with Powertex will know, the possibilities for this are endless. My brain was buzzing with ideas.  However, it was when I was sorting out stuff to take to the dump, that inspiration hit for a Powertex giraffe.

Step by step blog on how to create a powertex giraffe
Follow my step by step to create a unique Powertex Giraffe for your garden

I was loading a broken floor mop into my van that I settled on what I was going to create. The mop was speaking to me, and what it was saying was one word.  Giraffe.  As I turned it round in my hands, a picture started to form in my mind.  I even had a ready made pose, with the head lifted high, as though nibbling on leaves.  Yes I thought, I’m going to make you into a giraffe’s head sticking out of a plant pot in my garden. 

A strange thing to think?  Maybe, but I’m willing to guess that anyone who is into Powertex will have had similar thoughts on a regular basis.

mop to use for giraffe
Look at that, a ready made Giraffe shape

We have a plant that overhangs our fence and I decided to turn this into a feature by placing my giraffe so that it can decoratively nibble on the leaves. I opted to only make the neck as I thought it would look quirky sticking out amongst my plants.

Materials List

Making a Powertex Giraffe Garden Feature

Create the head

mop head for giraffe
I like to recycle a lot of packaging in this way

I scrunched up old plastic from packaging and old rubber gloves to form the shape of the face, before covering tightly with masking tape.

Create the base

sand base
Sand in the base that contained the disinfectant holder gives a bit of weight to stop it being too top heavy.

I filled the part that held the disinfectant base with sand before also covering with tin foil and tape to add weight.

Create the neck

masking tape to prep the surface
Please excuse the photobombing from Logan my dog. He was very interested in what I was making

Using old plastic I padded out the shape of the neck all the way down, and bound tightly with masking tape before painting with Powertex Fabric Hardener.

Stone Art clay and horns

giraffe head with stone art clay
I used old toothbrushes for the horns, and stones for the eyes

I mixed Stone Art Clay  face and neck leaving some pole (and sand) free to bury in soil in my plant pot.

Make the eyes and ears

Top tip, leave some wire hanging over the end of the ears to dig into the clay to ensure they stay put

I molded some ear shapes using tin foil and wire, before covering with tape and clay and adhering to the head. I also pushed some stones in for the eyes.

Easy 3d Flex clay

Make 3D Flex Clay in exactly the same way you made the Stone Art Clay. Be sure to leave it somewhere warm to dry off and create crackle and texture

I dry brushed with Powertex Rich Gold Pigment before adding some Easy 3D Flex patches. A stamp added even more texture.

Fabric eyelashes

I wanted my Giraffe to have gorgeous long lashes

I used Black Powertex Fabric Hardener and some tassles from an old key ring to create luscious lashes for my Giraffe.

Use some fringing

fringing for neck
This fringing that I got from the Scrap Store was perfect for my Giraffe’s neck hair

I soaked some of this fringing in Bronze Powertex to create the hair for my giraffe’s neck, and left the whole thing to dry off completely.

Dry brushing

giraffe neck with Powertex texture
Just look at all that texture in that 3D Flex!

The finishing touches

The final step was to dry brush the whole thing in Bronze Gold Pigment. This create a contrast to the Rich Gold that was on the Clay underneath the 3D Flex patches.

I wanted to be sure that anything  I used apart from Powertex was recycled.  Hence the stones for eyes, and the toothbrushes for horns.  I had thought of using old corks for the horns, and toyed with using hessian for the patches, but my love for Easy 3D flex won
out. 

If you decide create something similar, to ensure it is weather resistant please be aware that Stone Art Clay needs to be kept indoors for 6 months initially.

Gerald will stay safely inside until next year. Just before putting him
outside I will give another couple of coats of Easy Varnish, especially on the
Easy 3D Flex patches.

Powertex giraffe by Donna Mcghie
Powertex giraffe by Donna Mcghie

Obviously if you choose to make your own Giraffe you can do it on as big, or as small a scale as you wish – using anything that is available to you at home. If you decide to make one please do post a photo over on our Facebook page as we love to see what people are inspired to create. 

If you are unsure about how to create Stone Art Clay, my fellow design team member Annette has great instructions in this blog.

Thanks so much for reading, I hope you are inspired by Gerald. You can see more of my work on my facebook page, and my website www.artandmurals.co.uk.

Until next month, take care and Happy Powertexing 🙂

If Medusa could Stone Art you

Designer – Shell North

For my July article we are delving into ancient Rome and looking at incorporating Medusa and Stone Art. The Romans were renowned for their love of wine, both producing it and drinking it. So a wine Medusa jug is what I will teach you to make this time.

Medusa was a Gorgon and one of the most frequently repeated motifs in Greek and later, in Roman antiquities. The Legend has it that if you were to gaze into her eyes you would turn to stone. Or in our case…Stone art!

Powertex Stone Art Medusa jug by Shell North

Materials List

Powertex materials list for Medusa jug
Powertex item list

How to make a Stone Art Medusa jug

Make some Stone Art clay

To start I mixed my own colour using the Bronze, Lead and Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener to make my own shade of stone art clay. I mixed it with equal parts Stone Art powder to make the clay.

Mixing Powertex

TOP TIP Leave some of the Powertex mix aside before mixing in the Stone Art powder as you will need some for the cotton later.

Making the jug shape

Insert the bottle into the large yoghurt pot, add foil to create shape and cover in masking tape. Shape foil to create a handle and tape as above.

Make the jug shape with foil

The messy fun bit

Using the Stone Art clay, smooth pieces over the base little by little until covered. Shape a spout as desired with the Stone Art clay.

Add Stone Art clay

Adding the motif

Cover the back of your plaster face with a little Stone Art clay and smooth around the edges into position.

Plaster face
Use a plaster face

Creating the deadly snake hair

To create Medusa’s hair use some tiny strips of cotton and work them into the Powertex Fabric Hardener colour mix you made earlier.

Making fabric snake hair
Making snake hair

Creating moving hair

Using the wet strands, apply one by one in a wiggly position, over lapping and layering to create movement like living snakes!

Snake hair Medusa
Medusa

To finish

Dry brush lighter shades of Grey and Red ochre Powercolor pigments and Easy Varnish, finishing with lighter colours last to give a worn/aged appearance.

Powertex Stone Art Medusa jug by Shell North
Powertex Medusa jug by Shell North

Handy tip

TOP TIP To get even coverage with stone art, why not use a pasta machine to roll out your clay all in one equally level sheet. I have found many cheap second hand ones for £5 in charity shops! Just make sure your clay is not sticky before rolling through.

Did you see Kore’s planet canvas recently? I was hugely inspired by it so if you missed it, find it here and you too may find inspiration.

Hope you enjoyed this article? If so please comment below or share your inspiration on the Facebook Powertex Studio page.

Well that’s all for me this month,

Peace, love and a little splash of wine from my jug 😉

Shell xxx

Venetian Mask

Secret Art Box July 2019

Hi this is Kore and this month I got my hands on my first Powertex Secret Art Box! I was really surprised how much was packed into the box and the sample sizes of Powertex products are perfect. It was full of gorgeous things and I used just a few of the items to make this Venetian mask.

Venetian Mask from Secret Art Box Powertex by Kore Sage
Venetian Mask from Secret Art Box

I loved the colours chosen for this box, Plum acrylic paint, Turquoise and Berry pigments which look beautiful together. There is lots left for future creations too. I think this would be a great way to try Powertex Fabric Hardener for the first time or build up your supplies. The themed box is a great starting point if you’re stuck for an idea.

I worked on the large mdf mask in the box to create a wall art. I’ll make the second mask to hang with it too.

Materials list

I used the contents of the July Secret Art Box. I also used Easy Coat Mat from my stash to apply the Rice Paper and Brown Bister spray to colour the Easy 3D Flex.

Powertex Uk Secret Art Box contents July 2019
Powertex Secret Art Box July 2019

Make first layers

Paint the mdf mask with White Powertex to prepare it.

Rice paper

I added rice paper to one half of the mask using Easy Coat on the mdf and then over the top of the paper.

Easy 3D flex

Mix up some Easy 3D Flex with White Powertex and drag it over the other half of the mask. Leave to dry.

Powertex Venetian Mask layers with rice paper and Easy 3D Flex
Rice Paper and Easy 3D Flex

Add mdf shapes

Paint the shapes and glue them in place with White Powertex.

MDF flourishes
Adding mdf shapes

Add some fabric

Use some of the lace coated in Powertex to create textures and flourishes. I pinched a fan shape and rolled a trim into a flower shape.

Add fabric shapes with lace trim
Add fabric textures

Bister

When the Easy 3D Flex is dry and cracked, spray it generously with Brown Bister. Also spray the fabric pieces.

Spray generously with Bister
Spray generously with Bister

Add colour

Use the Plum acrylic paint to add colour to the mdf flourishes as this will be the base colour. Use the Turquoise pigment mixed with Easy Varnish on the edges of the mask.

Use Plum paint on the flourishes and edge the mdf with Turquoise pigment
Add colour with paint and pigment

Dry brushing metallics and turquoise

Add more colour to the to the mdf and fabric flourishes with the metallic pigment. Mix with Easy Varnish.

Use the metallic pigment mixed with Easy Varnish to add more colour
Add more colour

Adding highlights

Adding highlights is simple with White Powertex. Use a damp flat paintbrush and gently apply to the raised areas. I used the plaster flourish to add a white highlight to the other side.

Adding highlights with White Powertex
Adding highlights

Finishing touches

Add some of the tiny jewels for a bit of sparkle. You can also use Powertex and a little tshirt yarn to make a hanging hook for the back!

Venetian Mask wall art from Powertex Secret Art Box
Venetian Mask
Powertex hanging hook for venetian mask wall art
Hanging hook

Share your art

If you’ve received a secret art box we’d love to see what you create. Left over items can be combined with other boxes for lots of possibilties.

You can always share your makes in the subscribers Facebook group The Secret Art Box or The Powertex Studio. Or if you’re stuck for ideas don’t forget you can see other examples of subscription box makes from the Design Team to get you started.

Roman Column

Designer – Patricia Williams

As the theme for this month is the Roman Empire, for this article my thoughts turned to all those wonderful columns. They are quite majestic as they tower above us reaching for the sky. Before I started work on my project, I researched styles so I could get a feel for where I was heading.

Roman Column with Powertex by Patricia Williams Alex Henry
Powertex Roman Column

Materials list

Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener

Stone Art

Brown Bister

Yellow ochre Powertex Fabric Hardener

Corrugated cardboard

MDF or wood squares

Building My Column

Corrugated card column

I started by rolling my corrugated cardboard to size. Use a former underneath if you wish. The centre of a large tin foil would do to give it a bit of strength. Glue firmly together using Powertex Fabrc Hardener and leave to dry.

Add Stone Art

I gave my column a good covering of Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener and rubbed in a generous layer of Stone Art. I left it to settle while doing the same for the top and bottom of my Column. Repeating this stage a second time made sure it was well covered. 

Cover the card with Powertex and Stone Art

Spray with Bister

I finished by spraying generously with Brown Bister. This did give it a lovely look of worn stone. I left it all to dry overnight.

The Finishing Touches

I started to work on my decoration, I made scrolls from the corrugated cardboard I had used for the main structure, this worked well and added that extra touch.  I used the same technique of coating with Powertex and rubbing in Stone Art, attaching these to the column with a dab of Ivory Powertex.

Happy with that it was now onto dry brushing,  I decided to keep it simple and dry brush with Yellow Ochre and Ivory Powertex.

Powertex Roman Column with Stone Art
Powertex Roman Column by Patricia Wiliams

I am pleased with the result, what do you think? Would look great just standing in a corner of the garden or as a plinth for another one of your Powertex creations, its nice to elevate pieces of work to create layers and depths to a display.

I would love to see some of your makes so why not show them on The Powertex Studio. Also, if you would like to see more of my work pop over to Alex Henry on FB. I work in a wide variety of styles.

There are also lots of other fabulous articles on the Powertex Magazine, be sure to check them out they make very good reading and fill you with inspiration.

Thank you for reading I will be back again with more articles,

Patricia

Roman Chalice in Powertex

Designer – Jinny Holt

Our theme for this month was Roman Empire/Julius Caesar. I wanted to do a lot from this theme but I decided to make a Powertex Roman chalice.

I searched online for some ideas and already had a large brandy type glass, that I knew would be perfect for this article.

Did you know…

July is the seventh month of the year and the fourth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. It was named by the Roman Senate in honour of Roman general Julius Caesar, it being the month of his birth. Prior to that, it was called Quintilis, being the fifth month of the 10-month calendar.

How I made my Roman Chalice

Materials list

Powertex supplies
Items used for Roman Chalice

Prepare the glass

I started by using masking tape to cover the glass.

TOP TIP This is the best way to prepare the surface when using glass or plastic items.

Cover glass with Masking tape before using Powertex
Masking tape is your friend

Add fabric and clay

I dipped lace and material into IVORY POWERTEX Fabric Hardener and added to my glass. I used air dry clay to make mouldings as they reminded me of Roman shapes.

TIP… You could always mix Powertex Fabric Hardener with STONE ART to make your own clay.

Add fabric and clay textures
Fabric and clay textures

Coat the surface

Next I coated the whole piece with Ivory Powertex and rubbed in the Stone Art and let dry.

Remove the excess

I rubbed off any excess Stone Art with my hands.

Remove excess Stone Art
Stone Art applied

Paint the surface

I painted the whole thing with BLACK POWERCOLOR mixed with Easy Varnish and let it dry.

Add highlights

Mix a dry paint with Easy Varnish and SILVER Colortricx powder pigment and dry brush to add highlights.

Dry brush with Silver pigment
Chalice fit for any Emperor

Here’s a close up of my Roman Chalice.

Close up of Roman Chalice with Powertex

I hope you have enjoyed seeing how I accomplished this project. If you have been inspired by mine or any of my fellow design team members, you could always come and say hello on the THE POWERTEX STUDIO. Don’t be shy to upload any photos of projects you have created too.

You can get all your Powertex goodies at POWERTEX UK.

I post all my other creations at MUMS SHED on Facebook. Find Powertex on PINTEREST and INSTAGRAM too.

So until next time.

~LIVE~LOVE~LAUGH~CREATE~

Jinny

Venetian Carnival Canvas

The Secret Art Box – July 2019

Designer: Gill Goldsmith

This month’s Powertex Secret Art Box was full of wonderful Venetian Carnival themes and there was so much to play with. From the gorgeous lace and MDF masks to the Venice themed rice paper and the Fleur de Lys mould from ArtyCo. I couldn’t wait to get creating my Venetian carnival canvas.

Powertex UK Secret Art Box July 2019
Powertex UK Secret Art Box July 2019

I’ve been to Venice twice and think it is a beautiful city, so wanted to recreate the beauty and also the aged feel of the buildings with my piece. An 8 inch box canvas was the perfect size to create my mini work of art.

Additional materials used:

  • 8 inch box canvas
  • Powertex Easy Coat Mat
  • Blue and Brown Bister sprays
  • Powertex pigments in Violet Valentine, Clear gold and Silver

How to create your Venetian Carnival Canvas

Step 1

I painted the canvas with Easy Coat Mat and stuck the paper in position making sure I painted more over the image to help it adhere and protect the surface.

Applying Powertex rice paper

Top tip

A great tip is to wet around the edge of the image you want on the paper with a wet paintbrush. The paper will tear easily and give a textured edge.

Step 2

Next I created more texture on the canvas by mixing the Easy 3D flex, included in this month’s box, with the white Powertex, also in this month’s box.
Mix it until the clay spreads easily. Apply with a palette knife to the top and bottom corners to give the Italian stucco plaster effect.

Easy 3d Flex texture on canvas

Step 3

You could allow this to dry naturally but I sped up the process with a hairdryer. This gives a lovely bubbly texture.

Step 4

Using the white Powertex I painted the large mask. Dip the lace pieces in Powertex, making sure they are covered but not saturated.

Step 5

I worked on the large MDF mask using the various lace pieces included in the kit, and the MDF flourish and moulded flourish. Use White Powertex to stick it to the canvas.

White Powertex venetian carnival mask on canvas

Step 6

I created an air dry clay fleur de lys from the Artyco mould and added to the canvas.

Step 7

I removed the Venice wording from the MDF carrier sheet and used the negative image on the canvas.

Ensuring it was coated in the Powertex and then adding embellishments from my own stash of paper flowers, corners and charms.

White Powertex venetian carnival mask on canvas

Step 8

When completely dry, I sprayed it liberally with blue and brown bister. Don’t panic if you feel you’ve sprayed too much bister, you can wipe it back so it’s not so dark.

Adding Bister colour to Powertex mask

Allow this to dry thoroughly, before you highlight the piece with dry brushing.

Step 9

Finally once this was dry I could use my Pearl Red Pigment, Turquoise pigment and the Plum Pudding Acrylic Paint and varnish included in the kit.

This is where the piece comes to life, as you dry brush each area of detail and see all the texture emerge.

I also used violet valentine pearl pigment, clear gold and silver pigments from my stash.

Tutor Tip

Use a tiny amount of varnish, about the size of a 5p, and dip your brush into the varnish then lightly into your pigment. Work this on your brush and then take the excess of colour off on a cloth or kitchen paper before lightly stroking the brush across your work. The art of dry brushing is a dry brush, light strokes and build up the colour.

Powertex Venetian carnival canvas by gill goldsmith

I hope you enjoyed this project and that you will give it a go yourself. Please share your makes in The Powertex Studio and The Secret Art Box groups as we love to see what you create.

My last Secret Art Box project was an underwater theme in May. I’m a Powertex tutor in Kent, UK and you can find out more about me and my workshops at The Powertex Port.

Until next month, Happy Powertexing,
Lots of love
Gill xxx

Stormy Sea Tag with Powertex

Designed by – Donna Mcghie

Powertex stormy sea tag scene using mdf tags by Donna Mcghie
Seascape tag

Tags are really popular in the crafting world at the moment. For my stormy sea tag, I’m using the A5 tag from Powertex UK. They are great quality to work with, whatever your style of crafting.

Don’t you just love the fact that we all have our own individual style?  Obviously style evolves as we experiment and learn new techniques.  My own style I would describe as rather haphazard.  I’ve never been one for over thinking a project. 

Once many years ago an art tutor declared my work to be very ‘organic’. Initially I wasn’t quite sure how to take this, but I think I know what she was getting at. As an artist I like to allow my paint, Powertex, or whatever medium I’m using to have a life of it’s own.  You could say I’m a ‘go with the flow’ kind of a girl.

Go With The Flow

What do I mean by ‘go with the flow?’ Well, according to the artist Jenny Holzer “Going with the flow is soothing but risky.” I find it soothing to allow Powertex to take on a life of it’s own. I also love the sense of risk, the excitement of never quite knowing what I will end up with.

That could be why I love stormy seascapes. How wonderful that everyone’s storm will end up slightly different.

Materials list:

1: Prepare with White Powertex

Prepare mdf with white powertex
A5 tag and lighthouse mdf

Sponge Powertex White over MDF pieces and set aside to dry.

2: Blue Bister

Powertex mdf tab with blue bister and white fabric hardener for sky
Powertex Blue Bister makes a perfect blustery sky

Spray Powertex Ready Mixed Blue Bister on the top third of the tag. Use a damp sponge wipe away spaces for the clouds.

3: Adding fabric strips

Powertex mdf lighthouse template
I set this aside to dry for a while

Soak denim strips in transparent hardener to for sections of the lighthouse and paint the top.  A blast of ready mixed black bister gives a rugged effect.

4: Pouring Powertex

powertex mdf tag with bisters and fabric hardeners for stormy waves
This was my favourite part, where I got to ‘go with the flow’

Fun Time! Pour blue fabric hardener with smidgeon of white for the wave. Whilst still wet spray with green bister and blast with dryer for movement and crackles.

5: Place the lighthouse

powertex stormy seascape tag with lighthouse
It’s starting to come together

Place the lighthouse into position. Almost there now, just a couple of final touches and your picture will be complete.

6: Adding texture

powertex texture on mdf tag
Time for some texture

Steel grey pigment with some easy structure paste create a rock for the lighthouse to stand on, and 3D Sand with Yellow Ochre Powertex form a shoreline. If you wish to add a few more wild white touches with a pallet knife, go for it.

Finished Piece

Although this is only A5 in size, I think it packs a punch.  As I stated above, this was very much a ‘go with the flow’ project. 

Of course does help to have a rough idea of composition to keep the image interesting. Being a fan of the so called rule of thirds so, I placed my focal point (the lighthouse) to the left of the scene.

I also roughly directed the white foam on the wave to guide the eye up towards my focal point.

Powertex tag by Donna Mcghie
Stormy sea tag
The finished stormy sea tag

Please do post photos of your own stormy sea tags over on the Powertex Facebook Page, we love seeing what you create. Also feel free to leave any comments on here.

You can get tips on using Stone Art clay on a canvas seascape in last month’s blog.

I’m the Powertex tutor for Southampton, so if you are interested in a workshop please pop over to my website where details can be found on the blog section. More info on Jenny Holzer can be found here.

That’s all from me for now folks. Keep on going with the flow and see you next month.

Powertex planets canvas art

Designer – Kore Sage

Powertex planets are a fun and easy canvas project to try. It doesn’t take much in the way of supplies and if you’ve used stencils or masks before you’re half way there! With Powertex you really can use basic techniques for amazing results.

Powertex planets canvas art by Kore Sage using Blue Powertex and Bister sprays
Powertex planets canvas art by Kore Sage

Materials list

  • Canvas – I used an inexpensive rectangular canvas
  • Blue and Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener
  • Ready Made Bister sprays in Black, Red, Yellow and Green
  • Stiff cardboard to cut own circular masks
  • Hairdryer

Prepare your canvas and card circles

Prep your canvas with Blue Powertex Fabric Hardener and while it’s drying cut your circle masks. Draw around plates or lids and carefully cut out. Keep both parts.

Prepare your canvas and cut card circle masks.
Step 1 Preparing your canvas and circles

Spray the background

Arrange your circular masks. Darken the background with Black Bister Spray. Vary the amount around the canvas. Leave this to dry naturally.

Spray the background with Bister spray in Black
Spray the background with Black Bister

Paint the planets

Swap the mask for the stencil on each planet and paint the circle with a layer of Ivory Powertex, not too thin. Do one at a time!

Swap to the stencil and apply a layer of Ivory Powertex
Swap to the stencil and apply a layer of Ivory Powertex

Spray the Bister

While the Powertex is still wet, leave the stencil in place and spray generously with Bister in your chosen colour. Notice I’ve protected the canvas.

Spraying Bister onto wet Powertex
Spray Bister onto wet Powertex

Create the Bister crackles

Heat the Bister with a hairdryer until cracks start to form in the surface. A heatgun or tool can be too hot for this. Repeat these steps for all your planets.

Using a hairdryer to create Bister crackles
Heat the Bister until crackles form

Starry night

Put half a teaspoon of Ivory Powertex on a plate and use a very wet paintbrush to splatter it across the surface for stars. I had a practice on paper first!

Use a wet paintbrush to spray on stars with Ivory Fabric Hardener
Adding stars with Ivory Powertex

Finishing touches

One of my planets had smeared a lot so I tidied it up with a bit of Blue Powertex and Black Bister when it was dry. I didn’t worry too much about the others and I thought they looked pretty good. I love the blue Powertex coming through the Black Bister too!

Powertex planets canvas by Kore Sage
Powertex planets canvas by Kore Sage

Top Tips for Powertex planets

Each planet will take a while to dry so be careful when masking the rest of your canvas. I used a piece of printer paper held near my planets while I sprayed them. Using more than one colour of Bister on a planet to give it a darker side helps them look dimensional. Try Easy Structure paste or 3d balls to add texture before you add Bister.

Thanks for reading my blog today. I hope you will have a go at painting your own Powertex planets! If you do, please share your art in the Powertex Facebook group as we love to see what you make.

If you like to see more of my Powertex art, you might like my under the sea mixed media project here on the magazine or you can follow me on Facebook or on my website where I love to share my Powertex tips and art.

Until next time, make time to let your art out!