Powertex Ghoul Shoulder Accessory

Designer – Donna Mcghie

For this month’s articles the Powertex Design Team were asked to look back over the archives and put our own spin on a previous creation by one of our colleagues. What an inspiration it was going back over past Powertex sculptures and creations.  I was spoilt for choice.  However, the one creation that stopped me in my tracks was the Powertex Halloween Ghoul from October 2018, by the very talented Anna Emelia Howlett, of Rosehart Designs. 

Powertex ghoul for Halloween
A spooky little Powertex Ghoul shoulder buddy for Halloween by Donna Mcghie

I have to admit to have never having watched a Harry Potter film in my life. I was unsure what a dementor was, but I liked the challenge of doing something so outside of my comfort zone.

However, this was not to be an exact copy of Anna’s brilliant design.  My take on it was to create a smaller one, who could be worn on the shoulder to watch over me as Halloween approaches.  Whether he is friend or foe remains to be seen.

“Where there is no imagination there is no horror” So says Sherlock Holmes in Arthur Conan Doyle’s book  A Study in Scarlet.

Anyone who has ever watched a horror film with me will testify that I have a very vivid imagination.  It was still great fun creating this little Powertex dementor though

Materials List

How to make a Powertex Halloween Ghoul

Step 1

Skeleton base for Powertex skull
In Anna’s original she adapted her skull to have an open mouth. Mine was too small to do this.

I  poked some wire in the base of my skull for a neck, and then built shoulders using wire, foil and masking tape.

Step 2

powertex skull base sitting on shoulder
I placed my ghoul on the jacket shoulder to check it fitted

I added on long bony fingers with some extra wire.

Step 3

Powertex ghoul stage 4
I propped him up on a plastic container so I could work on him without it sticking

I painted him in black Powertex and added kitchen roll for texture.

Step 4

Black Powertex adds texture to the halloween ghoul
As well as material I added texture with Paperdec and string

I soaked thin cloth in Black Powertex Fabric Hardener for his cloak.

Step 5

Powertex Skull Head
Scary Face!!

I decided to enlarge his mouth and eyes by making holes with scissors.

Step 6

Final dry brushing of the Powertex ghoul
Dry brushing brings out all that texture

Finishing touches

Once my ghoul had dried I added the final touches of dry brushing, using Anna’s choice of pigments.

Getting it to sit upright on my jacket was a challenge. Initially I had planned to use velcro, but decided I didn’t want his company on a permanent basis, only on spooky nights.

I compromised by using big safety pins. As I had only used thin material I was able to push pins through his cloak, and also hook them over his bony hands. This ensured my ghoul stayed in place and looks over my shoulder as long as I want him to.

Powertex Halloween Ghoul by Donna Mcghie

I hope you have enjoyed my take on Anna’s Powertex ghoul. Any comments you wish to leave would be greatly appreciated. You can see the original ghoul over on Anna’s blog here. We’d love to see your take on a Powertex Ghoul, over on our Facebook page The Powertex Studio.

You can see more of what I get up to over on my website or my facebook page. That’s all from me for this month. Until September take care, keep on creating, and may all your ghouls be friendly ones 🙂

Horned Headpiece using Powertex

Designer: Abigail Lagden

This month we were given the challenge of recreating a project created by one of our fellow Design Team members. When I heard this, I knew exactly which project I wanted to try… Shell North’s fabulous Taurus Headdress from earlier this year. I loved every second of making my version, this horned headpiece.

Her step by step instructions were easy to follow and allowed me to put my own twist on the project. I sculpted curly horns rather than straight. Rather than adding silk flowers at the end I used flowers coated with bronze Powertex universal medium. I coloured them with powertex pigments.

Sculpting wearable art, horns sculpted. By Abigail Lagden
Horns sculpted from foil
Creating a wearable art By Abigail Lagden
Horns attached to base headband
Powertex fabric sculpture By Abigail Lagden
Wrapped with Powertex coated fabric
Powertex flowers added. By Abigail Lagden
Flowers added

It took me a couple of days to decide on the right colour for this piece. I was very tempted to go for rainbow horns but in the end went for something a bit more simple and I hope, sophisticated. Bronze gold over the horns and a mix of reds, oranges and yellows for the flowers.

Powertex horned headpiece wearable art by Abigail Lagden
Horned Headpiece by Abigail Lagden

Keep an eye on my Curiously Contrary facebook page to see where they turn up – I can’t wait to show them off.

Horned Headpiece by Abigail Lagden

If you’ve been thinking of trying one of the projects you’ve seen in the Powertex magazine then go for it. There are so many step by step articles that will guide you through lots of different projects. You are sure to find something to suit your style. Please do share your creations in our Powertex Studio facebook group.

If you’d like to see the inspiration for my horned headpiece, revisit Shell’s original article for her fabulous Taurus Headdress.

If you’d like to see more information about my upcoming workshops, please visit my Curiously Contrary website.

Until next time

Abs xx

Powertex Taurus Headdress

Powertex Taurus the Bull

Designer- Shell North

In this article my chosen subject matter was short listed to ‘Taurus’. Because I really love wearable art and cosplay, so I knew sort of where I was taking this piece from the start. But with just a few bits needing inspiration. And so the Powertex Taurus Headdress was created.

So Taurus is the second sign in the zodiac, and falling between the dates of 21st April – 21st May. To the Babylonians Taurus was the heavenly Bull whose rising marked the beginning of Spring. The element associated with Taurus is Earth so because of the Earth and Spring connections, some of its many associated colours are green and earthy browns.

Taureans are known to have an eye for beauty, so often  love to dress up or then also fill their homes with lots of interesting or pretty things!

So in a nutshell we now have a design brief.  A piece of wearable art that personifies Taurus,  but incorporates earthiness and then apealing to the eye.

Of course I was going to create a horned Powertex Taurus Headdress.

MATERIALS LIST

Step 1, Creating the Powertex Taurus Headdress base.

Using foil, wrap the head band around the centre to widen the surface area, and then cover in masking tape.

Step 2, Creating the horn shape.

Using foil, create two equally sized cones shapes. use a second and third layer to lengthen and widen, cover in masking tape, twist to shape.

Step 3, adding the horns.

Securely attach the horns first with red double sided sticky tape under the horn base, then wrap and secure the rest with masking tape.

Step 4, coating the horns.

With strips of white jersey cotton, work in the bronze brown Powertex liquid hardener until completely covered. wrap around the horns from the base up.

Step 5, Dry brushing.

Using a mix of easy coat varnish and pigment powders (Green & lime green Powercolor, Bronze gold Colortricx) dry brush over horns and headband.

Step 6, Finishing touches.

Wrap silk wired flowers around headband, securing with Transparent liquid hardener. Attach split rings under base of horns, adding three differing lengths of chain.

Here’s the finished piece!

 Powertex Taurus Headdress

This Powertex Taurus Headdress project was so much fun but so easy, so suitable for even Powertex beginners ! We roped in my daughters friend to model the headdress, take a look at them being worn

Have you ever created wearable art?

Because if so, we would love you to share these on the Powertex studio page, and if you are not already on there, find the Powertex studio page by clicking here.

Why not follow me on my own page The Crafty Little Corner and see what else I get up to, and maybe join in a workshop with me too.

Did you see the mandala Triptch article I wrote last month? If not take a look here.

Designer tip…

Have left over Powertex liquid hardener? If so, mix in equal amounts of stone art powder and make stone art clay. But remember when blended, to wrap it in cling film and store in an air tight container. Don’t waste it, but instead incorporate it in mixed media or sculpture pieces because left over’s, cannot go back in the bottle.

Top tool…


Cocktail sticks.

Because this is what I used for a pokey tool so to create a hole for my split rings to go through the Powertexed fabric when it was dry but still a little soft. But do remember to use a foam or cutting mat underneath to push it through onto because you don’t want an injury! Cocktail sticks are so cheap, but eco friendly and versatile. But also they can be used for scoring texturising and decorating patterns in paints, pastes and clays, added to mixed media works and so so much more!

So thats all from me this month, until next time

Peace, love and beautiful things

Shell