Roman Column

Designer – Patricia Williams

As the theme for this month is the Roman Empire, for this article my thoughts turned to all those wonderful columns. They are quite majestic as they tower above us reaching for the sky. Before I started work on my project, I researched styles so I could get a feel for where I was heading.

Roman Column with Powertex by Patricia Williams Alex Henry
Powertex Roman Column

Materials list

Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener

Stone Art

Brown Bister

Yellow ochre Powertex Fabric Hardener

Corrugated cardboard

MDF or wood squares

Building My Column

Corrugated card column

I started by rolling my corrugated cardboard to size. Use a former underneath if you wish. The centre of a large tin foil would do to give it a bit of strength. Glue firmly together using Powertex Fabrc Hardener and leave to dry.

Add Stone Art

I gave my column a good covering of Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener and rubbed in a generous layer of Stone Art. I left it to settle while doing the same for the top and bottom of my Column. Repeating this stage a second time made sure it was well covered. 

Cover the card with Powertex and Stone Art

Spray with Bister

I finished by spraying generously with Brown Bister. This did give it a lovely look of worn stone. I left it all to dry overnight.

The Finishing Touches

I started to work on my decoration, I made scrolls from the corrugated cardboard I had used for the main structure, this worked well and added that extra touch.  I used the same technique of coating with Powertex and rubbing in Stone Art, attaching these to the column with a dab of Ivory Powertex.

Happy with that it was now onto dry brushing,  I decided to keep it simple and dry brush with Yellow Ochre and Ivory Powertex.

Powertex Roman Column with Stone Art
Powertex Roman Column by Patricia Wiliams

I am pleased with the result, what do you think? Would look great just standing in a corner of the garden or as a plinth for another one of your Powertex creations, its nice to elevate pieces of work to create layers and depths to a display.

I would love to see some of your makes so why not show them on The Powertex Studio. Also, if you would like to see more of my work pop over to Alex Henry on FB. I work in a wide variety of styles.

There are also lots of other fabulous articles on the Powertex Magazine, be sure to check them out they make very good reading and fill you with inspiration.

Thank you for reading I will be back again with more articles,

Patricia

Roman Chalice in Powertex

Designer – Jinny Holt

Our theme for this month was Roman Empire/Julius Caesar. I wanted to do a lot from this theme but I decided to make a Powertex Roman chalice.

I searched online for some ideas and already had a large brandy type glass, that I knew would be perfect for this article.

Did you know…

July is the seventh month of the year and the fourth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. It was named by the Roman Senate in honour of Roman general Julius Caesar, it being the month of his birth. Prior to that, it was called Quintilis, being the fifth month of the 10-month calendar.

How I made my Roman Chalice

Materials list

Powertex supplies
Items used for Roman Chalice

Prepare the glass

I started by using masking tape to cover the glass.

TOP TIP This is the best way to prepare the surface when using glass or plastic items.

Cover glass with Masking tape before using Powertex
Masking tape is your friend

Add fabric and clay

I dipped lace and material into IVORY POWERTEX Fabric Hardener and added to my glass. I used air dry clay to make mouldings as they reminded me of Roman shapes.

TIP… You could always mix Powertex Fabric Hardener with STONE ART to make your own clay.

Add fabric and clay textures
Fabric and clay textures

Coat the surface

Next I coated the whole piece with Ivory Powertex and rubbed in the Stone Art and let dry.

Remove the excess

I rubbed off any excess Stone Art with my hands.

Remove excess Stone Art
Stone Art applied

Paint the surface

I painted the whole thing with BLACK POWERCOLOR mixed with Easy Varnish and let it dry.

Add highlights

Mix a dry paint with Easy Varnish and SILVER Colortricx powder pigment and dry brush to add highlights.

Dry brush with Silver pigment
Chalice fit for any Emperor

Here’s a close up of my Roman Chalice.

Close up of Roman Chalice with Powertex

I hope you have enjoyed seeing how I accomplished this project. If you have been inspired by mine or any of my fellow design team members, you could always come and say hello on the THE POWERTEX STUDIO. Don’t be shy to upload any photos of projects you have created too.

You can get all your Powertex goodies at POWERTEX UK.

I post all my other creations at MUMS SHED on Facebook. Find Powertex on PINTEREST and INSTAGRAM too.

So until next time.

~LIVE~LOVE~LAUGH~CREATE~

Jinny

Crafting with Children

My inspiration for this article about crafting with children, came from looking for wall art for our new studio. I kept coming across a saying by Pablo Picasso – Every Child is an Artist. With summer holidays approaching, what better way to keep children occupied, than letting them loose with some art.

This also got me thinking that children are so free with their creations, but as adults we are so self critical and don’t like to make mistakes. This limits us in our art.

“Every Child is an Artist” – Pablo Picasso

Over the summer get your children to create, and at the same time go back to being a child yourself. A bottle of Powertex Fabric Hardener goes a long way and is safe for children.

Powertex journal by Jill Cullum
Small journal using shades of pink dry-brushing

Materials list

Ideas for children’s Powertex crafts

On your days out, collect mementos. A trip to the woods, park or beach are great places to start. Twigs, pine cones and shells are easy to find. Use them to decorate a small journal cover. Old costume jewellery doesn’t need to be thrown out and we all have a bag of jumble that can be used.

Teach children about textures, let them feel pieces of bark, different shells or broken crockery. Buy a colour wheel and play around with mixing your own colours. The Powercolor pigments can be used with Easy Varnish, but also as a watercolour by just adding water.

Crafting for children with Powertex. Blue journal cover by Jill Cullum
All about the blues

These jigsaw necklaces are so easy to make and what is not to love about them? They can also be made into fridge magnets, a decorated journal cover (which can then be used to record your summer adventures), a small canvas or a door plaque.

Crafting ideas for children. Powertex jigsaw necklace by Jill Cullum
Jigsaw necklace

Crafting with children

Art doesn’t need to be expensive but being creative does need to be fun. No rules, no criticism, and no such thing as making mistakes – happy accidents are often the best pieces we create.

So look forward to the summer holidays and I can’t wait to see what everybody creates. Please share your art work over on the Powertex Studio.

If you need any further inspiration check out all the lovely ideas and step-by-step guides here on the Powertex UK Mixed Media Magazine. Annette also has a family Powertex project tutorial, with an underwater theme. Take a look over at Purple Meadow Arts & Crafts Facebook page for details of our Junior Art Club.

Have a great crafty summer with your little ones, and release your own inner child.

Jill x

Powertex Easy 3D Flex

Product of the Month for July 2019

Easy 3D comes as a heavy powder that is mixed with Powertex Fabric Hardener to create a clay. The clay is like dough and can be applied to canvas art as well as sculpture. It’s designed to crack as it dries which can leave deep cracked textures in the surface.

If you would like to try some Easy 3D Flex for yourself you can find it at Powertex UK. Need a little help to make up the clay? Just go to the instruction sheet at the bottom.

Powertex Design Team examples

The Design Team love to use this clay. Here’s some examples of how they’ve used it in their creations.

Sheep sculpture with Easy 3D Flex by Annette Smyth
Sculpture by Annette Smyth
Powertex Mixed media canvas by Anna Emelia Howlett
Mixed media canvas by Anna Emelia Howlett
Soul Sister sculpture with Powertex Easy 3D Flex by Donna Mcghie
Soul sister by Donna Mcghie

This planet art project by Jill has a tutorial in the Magazine, click on the image to open.

Powertex planet with Easy 3D Flex by Jill Cullum
Planet art by Jill Cullum
Canvas art by Fiona Potter Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Canvas art by Fiona Potter
Luxury egg by Jinny Holt with Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Mixed media egg by Jinny Holt

Shell’s beautiful Mandala art also has a tutorial, click on the image to see her step by step blog.

Mandala wall art by Shell North Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Mandala art by Shell North

This art doll kit is highly textured. You can see how Abigail puts this together in her tutorial, click on the image.

Powertex Art doll by Abigail Lagden
Art doll by Abigail Lagden
Canvas art by Kore Sage with Powertex textures
Canvas by Kore Sage

Find other project tutorials in this online magazine, just use the search bar to look for Easy 3D Flex in the categories.

Head over to Powertex Addicts United and join our community group, The Powertex Studio, share your creations. If you have a creation using Easy 3D clay, we’d love to see your makes.

If these projects have inspired you to try, you can get your own Easy 3D Flex at Powertex UK. Don’t forget you can use all your Powertex pigments, inks, paints and bister to colour these textures.

Here’s how to use Powertex Easy 3D Flex

If you’d like to mix your own Easy 3D clay but can’t get to a tutor, this will help you out.

Powertex Easy 3D Flex instruction sheet Powertex UK Easy3Dflex
How to use Powertex Easy 3D Flex

Venetian Carnival Canvas

The Secret Art Box – July 2019

Designer: Gill Goldsmith

This month’s Powertex Secret Art Box was full of wonderful Venetian Carnival themes and there was so much to play with. From the gorgeous lace and MDF masks to the Venice themed rice paper and the Fleur de Lys mould from ArtyCo. I couldn’t wait to get creating my Venetian carnival canvas.

Powertex UK Secret Art Box July 2019
Powertex UK Secret Art Box July 2019

I’ve been to Venice twice and think it is a beautiful city, so wanted to recreate the beauty and also the aged feel of the buildings with my piece. An 8 inch box canvas was the perfect size to create my mini work of art.

Additional materials used:

  • 8 inch box canvas
  • Powertex Easy Coat Mat
  • Blue and Brown Bister sprays
  • Powertex pigments in Violet Valentine, Clear gold and Silver

How to create your Venetian Carnival Canvas

Step 1

I painted the canvas with Easy Coat Mat and stuck the paper in position making sure I painted more over the image to help it adhere and protect the surface.

Applying Powertex rice paper

Top tip

A great tip is to wet around the edge of the image you want on the paper with a wet paintbrush. The paper will tear easily and give a textured edge.

Step 2

Next I created more texture on the canvas by mixing the Easy 3D flex, included in this month’s box, with the white Powertex, also in this month’s box.
Mix it until the clay spreads easily. Apply with a palette knife to the top and bottom corners to give the Italian stucco plaster effect.

Easy 3d Flex texture on canvas

Step 3

You could allow this to dry naturally but I sped up the process with a hairdryer. This gives a lovely bubbly texture.

Step 4

Using the white Powertex I painted the large mask. Dip the lace pieces in Powertex, making sure they are covered but not saturated.

Step 5

I worked on the large MDF mask using the various lace pieces included in the kit, and the MDF flourish and moulded flourish. Use White Powertex to stick it to the canvas.

White Powertex venetian carnival mask on canvas

Step 6

I created an air dry clay fleur de lys from the Artyco mould and added to the canvas.

Step 7

I removed the Venice wording from the MDF carrier sheet and used the negative image on the canvas.

Ensuring it was coated in the Powertex and then adding embellishments from my own stash of paper flowers, corners and charms.

White Powertex venetian carnival mask on canvas

Step 8

When completely dry, I sprayed it liberally with blue and brown bister. Don’t panic if you feel you’ve sprayed too much bister, you can wipe it back so it’s not so dark.

Adding Bister colour to Powertex mask

Allow this to dry thoroughly, before you highlight the piece with dry brushing.

Step 9

Finally once this was dry I could use my Pearl Red Pigment, Turquoise pigment and the Plum Pudding Acrylic Paint and varnish included in the kit.

This is where the piece comes to life, as you dry brush each area of detail and see all the texture emerge.

I also used violet valentine pearl pigment, clear gold and silver pigments from my stash.

Tutor Tip

Use a tiny amount of varnish, about the size of a 5p, and dip your brush into the varnish then lightly into your pigment. Work this on your brush and then take the excess of colour off on a cloth or kitchen paper before lightly stroking the brush across your work. The art of dry brushing is a dry brush, light strokes and build up the colour.

Powertex Venetian carnival canvas by gill goldsmith

I hope you enjoyed this project and that you will give it a go yourself. Please share your makes in The Powertex Studio and The Secret Art Box groups as we love to see what you create.

My last Secret Art Box project was an underwater theme in May. I’m a Powertex tutor in Kent, UK and you can find out more about me and my workshops at The Powertex Port.

Until next month, Happy Powertexing,
Lots of love
Gill xxx

Stormy Sea Tag with Powertex

Designed by – Donna Mcghie

Powertex stormy sea tag scene using mdf tags by Donna Mcghie
Seascape tag

Tags are really popular in the crafting world at the moment. For my stormy sea tag, I’m using the A5 tag from Powertex UK. They are great quality to work with, whatever your style of crafting.

Don’t you just love the fact that we all have our own individual style?  Obviously style evolves as we experiment and learn new techniques.  My own style I would describe as rather haphazard.  I’ve never been one for over thinking a project. 

Once many years ago an art tutor declared my work to be very ‘organic’. Initially I wasn’t quite sure how to take this, but I think I know what she was getting at. As an artist I like to allow my paint, Powertex, or whatever medium I’m using to have a life of it’s own.  You could say I’m a ‘go with the flow’ kind of a girl.

Go With The Flow

What do I mean by ‘go with the flow?’ Well, according to the artist Jenny Holzer “Going with the flow is soothing but risky.” I find it soothing to allow Powertex to take on a life of it’s own. I also love the sense of risk, the excitement of never quite knowing what I will end up with.

That could be why I love stormy seascapes. How wonderful that everyone’s storm will end up slightly different.

Materials list:

1: Prepare with White Powertex

Prepare mdf with white powertex
A5 tag and lighthouse mdf

Sponge Powertex White over MDF pieces and set aside to dry.

2: Blue Bister

Powertex mdf tab with blue bister and white fabric hardener for sky
Powertex Blue Bister makes a perfect blustery sky

Spray Powertex Ready Mixed Blue Bister on the top third of the tag. Use a damp sponge wipe away spaces for the clouds.

3: Adding fabric strips

Powertex mdf lighthouse template
I set this aside to dry for a while

Soak denim strips in transparent hardener to for sections of the lighthouse and paint the top.  A blast of ready mixed black bister gives a rugged effect.

4: Pouring Powertex

powertex mdf tag with bisters and fabric hardeners for stormy waves
This was my favourite part, where I got to ‘go with the flow’

Fun Time! Pour blue fabric hardener with smidgeon of white for the wave. Whilst still wet spray with green bister and blast with dryer for movement and crackles.

5: Place the lighthouse

powertex stormy seascape tag with lighthouse
It’s starting to come together

Place the lighthouse into position. Almost there now, just a couple of final touches and your picture will be complete.

6: Adding texture

powertex texture on mdf tag
Time for some texture

Steel grey pigment with some easy structure paste create a rock for the lighthouse to stand on, and 3D Sand with Yellow Ochre Powertex form a shoreline. If you wish to add a few more wild white touches with a pallet knife, go for it.

Finished Piece

Although this is only A5 in size, I think it packs a punch.  As I stated above, this was very much a ‘go with the flow’ project. 

Of course does help to have a rough idea of composition to keep the image interesting. Being a fan of the so called rule of thirds so, I placed my focal point (the lighthouse) to the left of the scene.

I also roughly directed the white foam on the wave to guide the eye up towards my focal point.

Powertex tag by Donna Mcghie
Stormy sea tag
The finished stormy sea tag

Please do post photos of your own stormy sea tags over on the Powertex Facebook Page, we love seeing what you create. Also feel free to leave any comments on here.

You can get tips on using Stone Art clay on a canvas seascape in last month’s blog.

I’m the Powertex tutor for Southampton, so if you are interested in a workshop please pop over to my website where details can be found on the blog section. More info on Jenny Holzer can be found here.

That’s all from me for now folks. Keep on going with the flow and see you next month.

Mosaic Madness

Designer – Annette Smyth

Hello Everyone, this month’s theme of Ancient Rome has got me really excited.

Why I hear you ask?…….Well, my Dad was born in the village of North Leigh in Oxfordshire.  It is here that the remains of one of the largest Roman villas can be found.  At its height, around the early 4th century it had 4 bath suites, 16 mosaic floors and 11 rooms with underfloor heating.  I expect the inhabitants found our climate a little cool!  

Mosaic madness

It was the mosaic floors that really grabbed my imagination and so I did a bit more digging into their symbolic meaning.  I found that homes often had a mosaic with medusa in. This was considered a lucky talisman as  it was thought to ward off evil,  as her stare would turn the viewer to stone.

Powertex Mosaic Madness by Annette Smyth

I immediately thought of using stone art to create the tiles and rather than Medusa I chose to use the Green man plaster , a more gentle image. The piece needed to be rustic and aged so bister was the perfect choice and having missing and misplaced tiles around the edge also gives it a timeworn feel.

If you would like to read more about the history of the villa please click here.

Materials List

Mdf circle or old hardboard place mat – mine was 28cm wide
Ivory Powertex Universal Medium
Stone Art
Green Man Plaster face
Brown Bister
Colortricx pigments – Red Ochre, Yellow Ochre, White, Mocha, Ultramarine blue
Easy Varnish
Powerwax (can be replaced with Stone Art see step 12)

You will also need
Non stick rolling pin
2 pieces of wood to be used as guides for rolling out your clay in step 2 – mine were just under 1cm thick 

1 Make Stone Art clay

Make the Stone Art clay by mixing the Ivory Powertex with the Stone Art.

2 Roll out the clay

Using the wooden guides, roll out the clay on a non stick surface.

Using guides allows you to roll to the same depth each time.

Texture added with sponge

3 Adding texture

Using a texture sponge, press into the clay to create texture then cut up into 1cm squares with scissors.

4 Dry enough tiles

Place these tiles to one side to start to dry.  I used 122 on my piece.

Designer tip – make spare tiles to test dry brushing colours on later.

5 Paint the base

Paint both sides of your base with Ivory Powertex and dry.

Place the plaster face on the base and roughly draw around it.

6 Make up your “grout”

Make up a paste of Stone Art powder and Ivory Powertex.  Think of this as your grout.

7 Attach the plaster face

Place some paste inside the line for your plaster face, paint the back of the plaster with Ivory Powertex and then place onto the base.

8 Place your tiles

Spread out more of paste, in a thickish layer, around the face and start placing your tiles in your chosen pattern.  

Mosaic sprayed with Bister

9 Spray with Bister

Spray with a light misting of brown bister and leave to dry overnight.

10 Add colour to the face

With a damp sponge, remove excess bister.

Using the Red and Yellow Ochre pigments mixed with Easy Varnish colour the plaster face.

Add Ultramarine Blue to the eyes.

Dry brushing the tiles

11 Colour the tiles

Using the Red Ochre, Yellow Ochre and Mocha pigments with Easy Varnish I coloured the outside 2 circles of tiles.

12 Colour the grout

Using Powerwax mixed with Yellow Ochre I created a paste to fill in the gaps between the tiles and up to the plaster.  Remove excess with a damp sponge.

Allow to dry overnight and polish with a soft cloth.

Top tip

Why not try using the Stone Art paste mixed with Yellow Ochre if you don’t have any Powerwax.

I have really enjoyed creating this piece and can see so many more projects that would work well with this technique. How about making your own plaque with your house number on?

I would love to know what you create following this article. Why not share your creations on the Powertex Studio Facebook group.

If you would like to see more inspiration ideas why not have a look at my previous article or join me for a workshop at my home studio.

Until next time, Happy Creative Adventures………Axx

Feeling Grey? It’s not a bad thing with Powertex.

Feeling grey? Using Lead grey Powertex Fabric hardener by Abigail Lagden

Feeling grey? One of the things that people often comment on when they see my creations, is the colours. Words such as rich, deep, bright and vibrant are common.

Therefore, they are often surprised to hear that almost all of them are made with either the bronze (brown) or the lead (grey) Powertex universal medium as the base colour.

Why Bronze & Lead for the Base Colour?

1. Final Colour Considerations

Bronze and lead are both neutral colours and therefore will look good when dry brushed using any of the powercolor pigments. In fact they are perfect for my signature rainbow colours created using Powercolor pigments!

Rainbox fairy house by Curiously Contrary
Rainbow fairy house with bronze base

If you start with a bold base colour such as red, blue, green, etc you have already limited what colours will work well on top and the final pieces can look a bit ‘flat’ and lacking in depth.

Fabric sculpted bottles by Curiously Contrary
The bottle on the left has green Powertex as the base colour, the middle bottle has black and the bottle on the right has a terracotta base. I think the middle bottle appears to have much more depth than the other two which look a little ‘flat’.

2. Depth vs Brightness

The thing I love most about fabric sculpting is the textures and depth that can be created. To create the illusion of greater depth, the colours within the folds of the fabric should be as dark compared to the top of the folds.

Therefore black and bronze Powertex will give you the appearance of greater depth. My preference is bronze as I like the warmth that it creates.

Rainbow dragon treasure chest by Abigail Lagden
This dragon’s treasure chest uses a bronze base colour, creating lots of depth.

Feeling grey?

To achieve a slightly lighter/brighter feel I use the lead Powertex. Whilst it loses just a little of the depth that bronze creates, the lighter base colour lifts the overall brightness of the piece.

Sea themed treasure chest by Curiously Contrary using Lead Grey Powertex Fabric Hardener
This sea-themed treasure chest has a lead base colour giving it a lighter, brighter feel.

Here are a few more of my creations to demonstrate the colours that can be achieved using black, bronze and grey Powertex with powercolor pigments :

Blue bird box by Curiously Contrary
Bird box created using lead Powertex with ultramarine blue and turquoise Powercolor pigments
Bird box created using bronze Powertex and a rainbow of Powercolor pigments
Feeling grey? Using Lead grey Powertex Fabric Hardener by Abigail Lagden
Business card holder created for ‘The Ugly Duckling’ using lead Powertex with lilac and ultramarine blue Powercolor pigments
Custom made business card holder made using black Powertex with red and burgundy Powercolor pigments

See more uses of bronze and lead Powertex in my previous articles. I used Bronze Powertex for my Steampunk Top Hat and lead Powertex for my Storage Caddy.

What are you favourite colour combinations? Let us know in the comments.

Curiously Contrary

Many of my creations are available to purchase and I also make customised pieces and take commissions. If you’d like to see where in the north east of England I’ll be with my creations over the summer, pop across to my Curiously Contrary website or facebook page.

Until next time, Abs xx

(Please note that the images I have shared in this article are of my own designs and are there to illustrate my points around colour. Please respect the time and creativity that goes into generating original designs by not recreating these pieces for sale or for other commercial purposes. If my designs inspire you to create something similar, that is fantastic, and if you are sharing them online, it would be lovely if you would acknowledge my designs (and the Powertex Magazine) as your source of inspiration.)

Sweet dreams upon a Powertex night sky

By Shell North

I love the simplicity of using something like string or twine and knots to create something magical and unique. Wanting to step away from the full circle dream catcher I drafted a moon with star idea for sweet dreams.

I wanted to use techniques to create vegan feathers with twine. A lot of my past customers have been vegan and dislike the use of animal products so creating an ethical dream catcher was up there on my to do list. Created with a ‘boho’ style making from twine, a recycled lampshade ring, recycled jewellery (charity shop) and Ivory Powertex to make weatherproof for outdoor use.

Powertex sweet dreams dream catcher by Shell North
Dream Catcher by Shell North

What are dream catchers exactly?

Sometimes referred to as “Sacred Hoops”, Ojibwe dream catchers were traditionally used as talismans to protect sleeping people, usually children, from bad dreams and nightmares. Native Americans believe that the night air is filled with dreams, both good and bad.

When hung above the bed in a place where the morning sunlight can hit it, the dream catcher attracts and catches all sorts of dreams and thoughts into its webs. Good dreams pass through and gently slide down the feathers to comfort the sleeper below. Bad dreams, however, are caught up in its protective net and destroyed, burned up in the light of day.

Sweet dreams

Make as a soothing tool for kids! I made dream catchers for my children when they were young. Explaining how these would help ease their nightmares, quite handy indeed.

Call it a placebo effect for non-believers but my children believed what I said and they worked at soothing their nightmares, happy days!

Note – Use real feathers with children however as the twine ones will be slightly shape and pointy when hardened.

Putting it all together

Twine dream catcher for sweet dreams by Shell North
Pre Powertexed dream catcher by Shell North

I made the twine feathers first, using a knotting technique  around a length of twine, next I wrapped the lampshade hoop with twine. Using the standard catcher webbing but didn’t go all the way around so I could create the moon shape. I added a hanging beach wood cut star and then covered everything in Ivory Powertex hardener.

Finally once dry I finished by attaching the junk jewellery and beads I have collected from car boot sales, donations or charity shops. I don’t think I’m going to colour this, I like the simplicity of it. I enjoyed this so much I think I’m going to re-purpose some more broken lamp shades though and create different colours!

Sweet dreams dream catcher with Ivory Powertex by Shell North

Inspired?

Why not try create one of your own sweet dreams and share on our Powertex studio group page on Facebook? We always love to see what you create that’s inspired by our blogs. Also don’t forget to comment below. What would you have done differently? Does this inspire you to create your own? Share your inspired dream catcher in the Facebook group.

Did you like my charity shop upcycles here? Catch my February blog where I used a lot of recycled items along with the Secret Art Box subscription box.

The subscription boxes are exciting boxes of exclusive Powertex goodies that are delivered to your door each month! Don’t miss out on the fun, get yours today HERE .

Well that’s all from me this month,

Peace, love and sweet dreams,

Shell x

Powertex planets canvas art

Designer – Kore Sage

Powertex planets are a fun and easy canvas project to try. It doesn’t take much in the way of supplies and if you’ve used stencils or masks before you’re half way there! With Powertex you really can use basic techniques for amazing results.

Powertex planets canvas art by Kore Sage using Blue Powertex and Bister sprays
Powertex planets canvas art by Kore Sage

Materials list

  • Canvas – I used an inexpensive rectangular canvas
  • Blue and Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener
  • Ready Made Bister sprays in Black, Red, Yellow and Green
  • Stiff cardboard to cut own circular masks
  • Hairdryer

Prepare your canvas and card circles

Prep your canvas with Blue Powertex Fabric Hardener and while it’s drying cut your circle masks. Draw around plates or lids and carefully cut out. Keep both parts.

Prepare your canvas and cut card circle masks.
Step 1 Preparing your canvas and circles

Spray the background

Arrange your circular masks. Darken the background with Black Bister Spray. Vary the amount around the canvas. Leave this to dry naturally.

Spray the background with Bister spray in Black
Spray the background with Black Bister

Paint the planets

Swap the mask for the stencil on each planet and paint the circle with a layer of Ivory Powertex, not too thin. Do one at a time!

Swap to the stencil and apply a layer of Ivory Powertex
Swap to the stencil and apply a layer of Ivory Powertex

Spray the Bister

While the Powertex is still wet, leave the stencil in place and spray generously with Bister in your chosen colour. Notice I’ve protected the canvas.

Spraying Bister onto wet Powertex
Spray Bister onto wet Powertex

Create the Bister crackles

Heat the Bister with a hairdryer until cracks start to form in the surface. A heatgun or tool can be too hot for this. Repeat these steps for all your planets.

Using a hairdryer to create Bister crackles
Heat the Bister until crackles form

Starry night

Put half a teaspoon of Ivory Powertex on a plate and use a very wet paintbrush to splatter it across the surface for stars. I had a practice on paper first!

Use a wet paintbrush to spray on stars with Ivory Fabric Hardener
Adding stars with Ivory Powertex

Finishing touches

One of my planets had smeared a lot so I tidied it up with a bit of Blue Powertex and Black Bister when it was dry. I didn’t worry too much about the others and I thought they looked pretty good. I love the blue Powertex coming through the Black Bister too!

Powertex planets canvas by Kore Sage
Powertex planets canvas by Kore Sage

Top Tips for Powertex planets

Each planet will take a while to dry so be careful when masking the rest of your canvas. I used a piece of printer paper held near my planets while I sprayed them. Using more than one colour of Bister on a planet to give it a darker side helps them look dimensional. Try Easy Structure paste or 3d balls to add texture before you add Bister.

Thanks for reading my blog today. I hope you will have a go at painting your own Powertex planets! If you do, please share your art in the Powertex Facebook group as we love to see what you make.

If you like to see more of my Powertex art, you might like my under the sea mixed media project here on the magazine or you can follow me on Facebook or on my website where I love to share my Powertex tips and art.

Until next time, make time to let your art out!