Powertex Easy 3D Flex

Product of the Month for July 2019

Easy 3D comes as a heavy powder that is mixed with Powertex Fabric Hardener to create a clay. The clay is like dough and can be applied to canvas art as well as sculpture. It’s designed to crack as it dries which can leave deep cracked textures in the surface.

If you would like to try some Easy 3D Flex for yourself you can find it at Powertex UK. Need a little help to make up the clay? Just go to the instruction sheet at the bottom.

Powertex Design Team examples

The Design Team love to use this clay. Here’s some examples of how they’ve used it in their creations.

Sheep sculpture with Easy 3D Flex by Annette Smyth
Sculpture by Annette Smyth
Powertex Mixed media canvas by Anna Emelia Howlett
Mixed media canvas by Anna Emelia Howlett
Soul Sister sculpture with Powertex Easy 3D Flex by Donna Mcghie
Soul sister by Donna Mcghie

This planet art project by Jill has a tutorial in the Magazine, click on the image to open.

Powertex planet with Easy 3D Flex by Jill Cullum
Planet art by Jill Cullum
Canvas art by Fiona Potter Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Canvas art by Fiona Potter
Luxury egg by Jinny Holt with Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Mixed media egg by Jinny Holt

Shell’s beautiful Mandala art also has a tutorial, click on the image to see her step by step blog.

Mandala wall art by Shell North Powertex Easy 3D Flex
Mandala art by Shell North

This art doll kit is highly textured. You can see how Abigail puts this together in her tutorial, click on the image.

Powertex Art doll by Abigail Lagden
Art doll by Abigail Lagden
Canvas art by Kore Sage with Powertex textures
Canvas by Kore Sage

Find other project tutorials in this online magazine, just use the search bar to look for Easy 3D Flex in the categories.

Head over to Powertex Addicts United and join our community group, The Powertex Studio, share your creations. If you have a creation using Easy 3D clay, we’d love to see your makes.

If these projects have inspired you to try, you can get your own Easy 3D Flex at Powertex UK. Don’t forget you can use all your Powertex pigments, inks, paints and bister to colour these textures.

Here’s how to use Powertex Easy 3D Flex

If you’d like to mix your own Easy 3D clay but can’t get to a tutor, this will help you out.

Powertex Easy 3D Flex instruction sheet Powertex UK Easy3Dflex
How to use Powertex Easy 3D Flex

Stormy Sea Tag with Powertex

Designed by – Donna Mcghie

Powertex stormy sea tag scene using mdf tags by Donna Mcghie
Seascape tag

Tags are really popular in the crafting world at the moment. For my stormy sea tag, I’m using the A5 tag from Powertex UK. They are great quality to work with, whatever your style of crafting.

Don’t you just love the fact that we all have our own individual style?  Obviously style evolves as we experiment and learn new techniques.  My own style I would describe as rather haphazard.  I’ve never been one for over thinking a project. 

Once many years ago an art tutor declared my work to be very ‘organic’. Initially I wasn’t quite sure how to take this, but I think I know what she was getting at. As an artist I like to allow my paint, Powertex, or whatever medium I’m using to have a life of it’s own.  You could say I’m a ‘go with the flow’ kind of a girl.

Go With The Flow

What do I mean by ‘go with the flow?’ Well, according to the artist Jenny Holzer “Going with the flow is soothing but risky.” I find it soothing to allow Powertex to take on a life of it’s own. I also love the sense of risk, the excitement of never quite knowing what I will end up with.

That could be why I love stormy seascapes. How wonderful that everyone’s storm will end up slightly different.

Materials list:

1: Prepare with White Powertex

Prepare mdf with white powertex
A5 tag and lighthouse mdf

Sponge Powertex White over MDF pieces and set aside to dry.

2: Blue Bister

Powertex mdf tab with blue bister and white fabric hardener for sky
Powertex Blue Bister makes a perfect blustery sky

Spray Powertex Ready Mixed Blue Bister on the top third of the tag. Use a damp sponge wipe away spaces for the clouds.

3: Adding fabric strips

Powertex mdf lighthouse template
I set this aside to dry for a while

Soak denim strips in transparent hardener to for sections of the lighthouse and paint the top.  A blast of ready mixed black bister gives a rugged effect.

4: Pouring Powertex

powertex mdf tag with bisters and fabric hardeners for stormy waves
This was my favourite part, where I got to ‘go with the flow’

Fun Time! Pour blue fabric hardener with smidgeon of white for the wave. Whilst still wet spray with green bister and blast with dryer for movement and crackles.

5: Place the lighthouse

powertex stormy seascape tag with lighthouse
It’s starting to come together

Place the lighthouse into position. Almost there now, just a couple of final touches and your picture will be complete.

6: Adding texture

powertex texture on mdf tag
Time for some texture

Steel grey pigment with some easy structure paste create a rock for the lighthouse to stand on, and 3D Sand with Yellow Ochre Powertex form a shoreline. If you wish to add a few more wild white touches with a pallet knife, go for it.

Finished Piece

Although this is only A5 in size, I think it packs a punch.  As I stated above, this was very much a ‘go with the flow’ project. 

Of course does help to have a rough idea of composition to keep the image interesting. Being a fan of the so called rule of thirds so, I placed my focal point (the lighthouse) to the left of the scene.

I also roughly directed the white foam on the wave to guide the eye up towards my focal point.

Powertex tag by Donna Mcghie
Stormy sea tag
The finished stormy sea tag

Please do post photos of your own stormy sea tags over on the Powertex Facebook Page, we love seeing what you create. Also feel free to leave any comments on here.

You can get tips on using Stone Art clay on a canvas seascape in last month’s blog.

I’m the Powertex tutor for Southampton, so if you are interested in a workshop please pop over to my website where details can be found on the blog section. More info on Jenny Holzer can be found here.

That’s all from me for now folks. Keep on going with the flow and see you next month.

Planet in the Night Sky

A fantasy planet

Designer – Jill Cullum

Planet in the night sky in Powertex by Jill Cullum
Powertex Planet in the Night Sky by Jill Cullum

For my planet in the night sky, inspiration came from warm summer nights, sat in the garden, looking out for shooting stars. I decided to try and replicate one of the planets. Hmmm, once started though, my imagination overtook and the finished article became much more magical.

Easy 3d flex makes beautiful cracks and texture. Experiment using different mediums to add colours. Here I have used layers of inks and acrylics, with a final layer of wax.

As you will see from the photographs, things changed along the way. This is what I love about mixed media. Some layers get covered, some peak through. It’s all part of the journey of creating what you love. Just go with it!

The Secret Art Loft acrylics and inks work wonderfully for layering up. Their translucent quality makes blending easy, and the metallic inks look like molten metal.

Top tip

I find it is really important with mixed media, to let each layer dry thoroughly before moving onto the next. Not an easy one for me, as I am an impatient crafter. However, your layers will become muddy if they aren’t dry.

Materials list

Creating a base

Creating a base for the planet with Powertex
Step 1 – creating a base

Pour Powertex liquid colour onto the canvas. Spray with Bister of a different colour then dry with a hairdryer, to create the crackle effect.

Add texture by creating a heavy crackle effect

Adding more texture to your planet base with Easy 3d Flex
Step 2 – adding texture

Mix Easy 3d flex with Ivory Powertex to create a clay. Layer over half of the canvas. Dry with hair-dryer spraying lightly with blue bister during the process.

Creating further texture

Use Powertex and fabric and clay to add texture layers to your planet
Step 3 – creating further texture

Using material, coated in Ivory Powertex and small ‘craters’ made from the 3d flex clay, build the layers of your planet.

Adding colour

Add green colours to the cracked areas of the planet
Step 4 – adding colour

Start by adding green ink to the deep cracked area and violet acrylic to the green side of the planet.

Building layers

add clay craters and shapes to the surface
Step 5 – building layers

Using greens, pinks and purples, layer the craters, blending as you go. Paint the material section with black acrylic, then add layers of metallic acrylic.

Powerwax

Use Powerwax mixed with powder pigment to layer on colour to your planet textures
Step 6 – Powerwax

On the side created by 3d flex, add a layer of Powerwax, mixed with pigment. Once dry, wipe with a damp sponge to add interest.

Finishing Touches

I decided my fantasy planet needed a touch more ‘bling’ so I added a few beads, blending in with the colours I had chosen along the way. The joys of creating a fantasy planet are that you can really be free with your choice of colours and the texture that you create. It’s nice not to be too rigid in your planning, as planets evolve, then so should a piece of art.

Planet in the night sky

Powertex planet in the night sky by Jill Cullum
Powertex planet in the night sky

I am looking forward to seeing lots of new planets, so feel free to share them in the Powertex Studio.

If you would like further planet inspiration take a look at this blog from Annette Smyth. Or why not join me for a workshop to create your own planet. Bye for now, Jill x

Upcycled Powertex pot

Designed by – Anna Emelia Howlett

Upcycled Powertex Pot by Anna Howlett

If you saw my shows with Powertex UK on HOCHANDA on May 3rd at 12pm and 4pm you would have caught my water pot. Made from my mum’s giant yoghurt pot I felt it was only fair to gift it to her. I hope you felt inspired to make your own upcycled powertex pot. Here are some tips and a materials list for how I made mine.

Materials

Stone art clay ammonite fossils
All pearl pigments from the party pearls pigment tray were used on the fossils to make them pop.

What to use to create an upcycled Powertex pot

Don’t forget Powertex can do many things. It acts like a primer, glue and paint. It will harden most fabrics and textiles. If you would like them to be water resistant you need to use fibres with at least 80% cotton in them, then cure for 3 weeks. For my upcycled Powertex pot I used black Powertex fabric hardener on different fabrics and textiles to cover the pot. Coated the mdf starfish with a mixture of black Powertex, 3d sand and balls. I created some stone art clay, pressed into the new super cute fossil moulds and stuck down with Powertex.

Dry brushing with White Powertex
Dry brush white Powertex on the black Powertex to pick out the detail.

How to make your pearl pigments pop

Leave your black base layer to harden by leaving to dry, either in the air or with a hair dryer. Then use the new White Powertex to dry brush over the top because this helps to bring out all the texture in the materials. It also gives a base for your colours to lie on top of. The pearl pigments are translucent and this technique allows them to show up and pop on a black base. This is because you’ve put the white layer down over the black.

Using pearl pigments to highlight
Pearl pigments

Share your upcycled Powertex pot with us

These make super water pots or plant pots. Why not give it a go! And don’t forget to share your makes in The Powertex studio, I love knowing I’ve inspired you to create your own works of art. Please leave a me a note in the comments if you have found this article useful. You can find me at Rosehart Studio. You might also be interested in my mixed media canvas project. Toodles Anna xXx

Upcycled Powertex Pot by Anna Howlett

Under The Sea Powertex Sculptures

Powertex shark by Donna Mcgghie

By Donna Mcghie

What lies under the sea can be both beautiful and terrifying in equal measure.

I decided to make my own homage to the 1970’s film Jaws for my first underwater sculpture for this article. Thanks to this film I always feel a primeval sense of unease when swimming in deep water, and that music hovers around at the back of my brain. However at the same time I also have an exhilarating rush of adrenaline. My senses feel alert and vibrant. 

Under the sea, Powertex shark by Donna Mcghie
Although I am scared of sharks, I have grown rather fond of this gnarly old Powertex king of the seas

Powertex Stone art mixed with black Powertex fabric hardener was the perfect medium for this gnarled, battle scarred shark.

Powertex zip mouth on shark
An old zip works perfectly for his pointy little teeth
Powertex shark on base
The black metal base makes the perfect base for this powertex sculpture

The sea bed can be an eerily beautiful setting. Mixed media was used to create this under water 3D canvas.

The eerily beautiful seabed that is home to my shark

The illusion of the sea was created by using a mixture of blue and white Powertex Fabric Hardener sprayed with blue bister. I created the spiky coral by soaking Powercotton in transparent Powertex fabric hardener. Shells that are not conventionally pretty added the finishing touch.

Beware of Beautiful Powertex Mermaids

Powertex mermaid by Donna Mcghie
I used bits of lace and paperdecoration to add texture

Many legends and myths are connected to the sea. One of the most enduring myths is that of the mermaid.

My mermaid canvas was created by swirling blue and white Powertex fabric hardener onto a canvas. Bister was then added and blasted with a hair dryer.

My mermaid started to take shape when I poured green Powertex fabric hardener to create the shape of a tail.

I mixed Powertex terracotta and white fabric hardeners together to create a flesh tone, whilst Yellow ochre fabric hardener worked well for the hair.

Davy Jones’s Locker

There are many versions of who Davy Jones was, and just as many theories as to just how he ended up lurking at the bottom of the sea.

Maybe he was seduced by the beauty of a passing mermaid. Her beauty having lured him down to the murky depths below.

Powertex under the sea
My Davy Jones sports a jacket I spied in a charity shop, soaked in Bronze Powertex Fabric Hardener

Our facebook page The Powertex Studio is a great place for ideas and motivation. You can also inspire others by sharing your own makes.

You can also see more of my work and find out about my workshops on my website www.artandmurals.co.uk.

My last month’s blog was inspired by the artist Vincent Van Gogh

That’s all for now. As this is an inspiration blog I have not done step by steps, but if you would like more detailed instructions I am happy to provide them. Please leave me a comment below if you like what you see, and remember to take care, especially when swimming in deep water.

After all, you never know what is lurking beneath.

February Secret Art Box

Newly trained certified Tutor Gill Goldsmith from Chatham, Kent just can’t get enough of Powertex! She was feeling the love this month with her The Secret Art Box, the new craft subscription box from Powertex UK. Here are some of the wonderful works of art she created with hers. Want to subscribe to The Secret Art Box? Find all the different options on offer by following the link here.

We love Powertex!

I was really excited to create with all the gorgeous things that arrived in this month’s Secret Art Box. February’s theme was LOVE and included red Powertex and hearts and cherubs.

I decided to make a frame, draped in fabric using all the gorgeous embellishments. So I started with the back of the frame and added texture with a stencil and Easy Structure. Easy Structure is a lovely thick paste by Powertex UK. It goes smoothly through stencils and leaves a really raised finish.

I then went on to drape the frame 6 x 6 inch frame with some old cardigan material that was quite lacy. And added the embellishments of hearts, corners, fabric and the cherub and then allowed this to dry thoroughly.

Next I worked more on the back ground of the frame, colouring with the Powertex, adding embellishments and the gorgeous plaster heart to the centre. Once everything was dry, the next day, I started on the colouring process.

Red Powertex before distressing
Red Powertex after distressing

Having a limited colour palette, I worked with dark green pigment and a brown spray paint to bring out the definition in the piece. I also used the same colouring on the frame.

Then highlighted, drybrushing, with the red lipstick pearl pigment and red acrylic paint included in the kit. I also added metallic highlights with gold pigment. I was very pleased with the final result.

Finished piece

I hope you have found some inspiration in my piece and have a go for yourself! Please do share your makes over on Facebook in The Powertex Studio. Take a look at another article using this months The Secret Art box here.

Join me!

You can follow my adventures on my new Facebook page The Powertex Port. I will be running my first workshops soon at St.Mary’s Island Community Centre, Chatham. Send me a message via my Facebook page for details. I would love you to come join me. Happy crafting Gill. x

Step by step to techniques used to create a Powertex Box – Donna Mcghie

Hello and a very Happy New Year to everyone.

One of my resolutions for 2019 is to try and catch up with the modern age by getting to grips with videos in my blogs.   As you can also see, my daughter has been very helpful in getting them onto my computer for me, hence the titles of the videos.

What you will need to create your button tin:

Step by Step Instructions and Techniques:

1) As the box I was using was plastic I covered the base section with masking tape and then painted over this with Powertex Hardener so that the material would have something to adhere to.

2) I painted the lid with white gesso

IMG_20181228_171807-01
I painted the lid with white gesso so that my art deco image would show up

3) Once the bottom section was dry enough,  I turned it upside down and proceeded to soak strips of material in the Powertex Fabric Hardener and after squeezing out thoroughly placed them over the base.  At this point I was keeping the material nice and smooth as I laid it on as I wanted a flat bottom for my tin to rest on.

4) I dried this with a hair dryer and once dry enough, turned it over and started to work on my sides.  I wanted more texture on the sides, so scrunched up my fabric and added buttons as well.

IMG_20181229_154032-01
This is  a photo of the side once it has been dry brushed

If you want to you can also do this on the inside of your box.

5) Whilst this was drying off, I started to work on my lid.  I gently tore around the image I wanted to use from the Powertex Art Nouveau Rice Papers.  Then, using a good quality brush I brushed a little of the varnish onto the dried gesso, before carefully placing my image where I wanted it to go.  I then secured this in place by brushing over with a couple of more layers of varnish.  (NB: It is worth using a good quality brush for this as you want the image to be nice and smooth, the Powertex Brushes are perfectly designed for the job).

5) Once my image was in place, I carefully built up a pattern around it.  I wanted the most texture on my lid, so have done a short video to demonstrate how I did this.

6) Once the lid was covered, I added pieces of jewellery from my junk stash.  I also liked the idea of adding a frame, so used a small mdf one, and then, in memory of my nan and her tin, added some more buttons as well.

IMG_20181228_170255-01
I couldn’t resist adding a choker to my lady

7)  I left my box to dry off completely overnight

8) The next day it was time for my favourite part, dry brushing.  I wanted to give the impression of a bronze tin, whilst also subtly incorporating some of the colours on the Art Nouveau image, so I opted to use pigments in Bronze Gold, interference Blue and Interference Red.  Dry brushing is simple once you get used to the technique which is this:

  • Dip your flat brush into a small amount of Powertex Easy Varnish
  • Then dip the same brush into a small amount of whichever Powertex Pigment you have chosen
  • Now wipe the brush off on a sheet of paper towel.  This may counter productive, but it really is worth doing as you will get the best results when the brush is quite dry and will only pick out highlights, rather than smothering your design with thick colour.
  • Now you are ready to very gently, sweep your brush over your design.  Being sure to keep it flat.  You will be amazed at how quickly your design starts to come to life.

My best tip for dry brushing would be to start off gently and gradually build up to the depth of colour you want.

9) I did this over the whole of my tin.

10) And voila!! A rather bog standard plastic chocolate box that was destined to be added to landfill is now a  beautiful button box, in memory of a lovely lady.

IMG_20190102_112733-01
My finished box

I really enjoyed making this, and obviously similar boxes can be transformed in so many different ways – to reflect the personality of whoever you are making it for, or in memory of.

I hope you enjoyed this blog (please excuse the amateur video techniques, I will get better, I promise).  If you create your own version of one of these I would love to see it, and you can post photos on the Powertex Addicts Facebook Page

If you would like to see more about what I do, and why I do it my website page is www.artandmurals.co.uk

Powertex Happiness Jars – Kore Sage

Powertex Happiness Jars

With the festive season in full swing, it’s a time we give thanks and reflect before moving into the new year. Many of us state intentions and plan to start something new. Maybe you make resolutions or choose a word for the year. I’m trying something new with this project too. Every day I write three things I’m thankful for in my journal but with this project I’m keeping them in a jar instead. These Happiness Jars will help me to keep focused on positive things into the new year and through 2019.

GratJarCUWide

Happiness Jars have been around a long time in craft circles but I’ve never decorated my own with Powertex. Of course with endless Powertex possibilities I needed to narrow down a couple of techniques! I chose Stone Art and Easy Structure techniques but fabric wrapping or Stone Art clay would be fantastic. These are the jars I made using simple techniques.

Powertex Happiness Gratitude Jars by Kore Sage

Powertex Happiness Jars

The idea is to fill them up with your wishes, intentions or thanks. Use pieces of coloured paper and write thanks each day to add to your Gratitude jar or maybe a hope to your Wish Jar or a happy moment to a Memory Jar. Read these anytime or save them up for the end of the year. They make a great boost on tough days.

Gratitude Jar with Easy Structure

Supplies:

A glass jar with lid, Easy Structure, 3d Balls, mdf alphabet, clay flowers from the daisy mould, some mdf Dropouts and some bits from my stash. To finish, Red and Blue Powertex Universal Medium and Easy Varnish with Copper Colortricx pigment. Use what ever you have to embellish and colour your jar.

Clean the jar to remove any glue from the outside. Use a plastic palette knife to add the Easy Structure paste over a couple of areas on the jar and to cover the lid. I had my embellishments ready and just pushed them into the paste. The Easy Structure is super strong and holds everything really well. I added letters, a few flowers and leaves, mdf circles from the drop outs pack and some 3d balls.

It’s a good idea to clean off any paste smudges you don’t want with a wet cloth before you leave it to dry. I left mine overnight.

GratJar2

Paint your textures with Powertex, I used a mix of Red and Blue Powertex (to make a dark purple) but any dark colour will work well. Wipe off any excess Powertex from the glass and leave to dry for an hour or so.

Finishing touches are done with a dry brushing technique with Copper Colortricx. Mix a little powder pigment into a tiny amount of Easy Varnish with a flat brush, for a dry paint. Wipe off the excess onto a paper towel before brushing over the textures to highlight them.

GratJarCUSq600

Wish Jar

Supplies:

I used Transparent Powertex (but any colour will work for this), Stone Art and Colortricx Powerpearl pigment with Easy Varnish.

I stenciled shapes onto the jar (the Wonderland stencil was good for this). This was fairly easy because of the flat sides but would also work on a round jar. A little masking tape to hold the stencil in place helped before I applied a little Powertex through the stencil with a brush. Then press on a little Stone Art Powder while it’s wet. Brush away any excess. Repeat the shapes all over the jar and leave to dry for an hour.

For the lid, coat with Powertex and then Stone Art and add an embellishment. I added a wooden star left over from my Christmas stash.

Mixing up some Powerpearl pigment with a bit of Easy Varnish was a quick way to highlight the raised areas. I used a small brush to add the Powerpearl finish to the stenciled shapes and over the lid. Then a quick brush of Copper over the star. The perfect little jar for my wishes!

WishJarFinSqWeb2

A note about working on glass

Powertex will stick to glass however it can be a bit slippery! If you want to wrap fabric around your jar, small pieces of tape can help. A light weight fabric is a good choice for this project as it might not need tape.

A new start

These jars are the perfect way to start the new year, full of thanks and hope for the coming months. There are so many ways to alter the jars and make something you can treasure all year. Whether you make a wish jar, a memory keeper or a pick-me-up jar I hope you share your creation at Powertex Addicts United so I can see! How will you use your Happiness Jar?

I’m so pleased to say that I’ll be back next year with more projects for the Powertex Design Team. It’s such a pleasure to be part of this amazing team and to be creating new projects to share here. You can also find more of my projects and blogs at Kore Sage Art.

The festive season is well under way and it’s a busy time for many. However you’re spending this time of year I hope you find some time to let your art out.

Until next time,

Kore x

Christmas Powertex Creativeness – Jinny Holt

Well hello and seasons greetings to you all.

I do love Christmas and my Christmas mojo usually goes into overdrive at this time of year! So for my December blog, it would be rude NOT to do a Christmas tutorial and for this, I decided to do a Powertex Christmas tree. It is done with using a very few basic pieces of material and of course a bottle of Powertex. In this case, I used BRONZE POWERTEX

For this project, I used some cardboard, from which Powertex materials were delivered in,  Powertex, and an old pillowcase and some scraps of lace and sack cloth.

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I cut and shaped my cardboard into a cone shape and added masking tape to help secure it to its shape. I dipped my cut strips of pillowcase into my powertex and started wrapping the strips around the tree, the more strips you use the more texture you can create. I found some bits of lace and sackcloth and soaked these in Powertex and added them to my tree shape. I am a bit of a glue gun fanatic and decided to drizzle some hot glue down my tree shape.

Next for some colour, as I was doing this tree for a friend, she wanted a green tree, I used a mixture of colours and mediums, I started with some green acrylic and then added some Powertex pigment colours.48164589_2489309981083548_8377024022231121920_n

I have used some of the Art Lofts pearly pigment powders GOLDEN OLIVE and  to highlight and dry brush and of course, I used lots of gold LIMONCELLO GOLD!! I get kind of sidetracked when I add the colours and the pigments and it never ceases to amaze me, how your piece comes alive at this stage!

I left my tree overnight to dry off and then added some Christmas bits and pieces on it to complete the look of my tree.

So next time you think about throwing away that cardboard box, think again, what could it be? A bottle of powertex, a few bits and bobs and a pinch of imagination.

For all other ideas, tips and tricks with what you can do with Powertex try…

THE POWERTEX STUDIO

POWERTEX UK 

You can also find me on Facebook at Mums Shed

Thank you for reading this blog and I hope whatever you are doing over the Christmas season be safe and be happy and keep creating.

Until next month,

~Jinny~

How to create a Powertex Halloween ghoul – Anna Emelia Howlett

Something Wicked this way comes! A Powertex Halloween sculpture.

Some of our family live in Canada and it’s kind of a big thing to decorate your houses and go trick or treating. Every year we get photos of the different outfits chosen and the copious amounts of candy my nieces have collected. We don’t so much celebrate Halloween in our household. However, I do happen to have a Harry Potter inspired room. And this guy is going to fit right in.
He was rather a challenge but here is my ghoul inspired Dementor. And I am about to walk through with you exactly how he was created. So you can make one as a decoration for Halloween or just as a permanent feature to your room.
Suggested Ingredients list: Wire, empty kitchen roll, masking tape, skull head, Black Powertex, cheese cloth or old t-shirt, stockinette, powercotton, white powercolor, silver colortricx, interference blue pigment, varnish.
Step One: I had a spare mini skull in my stash. I cut his teeth out and changed the angel of his jaw. Holding it in place with a long piece of wire. Making a loop at the top I thread the wire through the top of the head holding the jaw in place, leaving a length as his neck. Then attached to a kitchen roll, which I bent into an arch for his shoulders and covered in masking tape. I measured about 60cm of wire to pass through the roll before taping up these would become the base of his arms.
Step two: I used some masking tape to fill in his mouth and around his eye sockets which I made a little larger by cutting out with a scalpel. And started wrapping the arm wire with foil. Using more around the top and bottom end of the section to create a bone looking shape.
Step three: I took 6 lengths of quite long wire. I wanted my ghoul to have long boney fingers. Taping at the base I bent one length done to be able to attach to the arm. The other lengths I trimmed so they mimicked the length of fingers on a hand.

Step four: Then I started covering with masking tape. Adding tin foil at the knuckles and then covering in masking tape. Attach the hands to the end of the wire arm by winding the spare wire at the hands wrist section around the bone arm base. Cover up with masking tape.

Step Five: This is the type of base you want to have created. I covered in Black Powertex and kitchen roll to give the base and extra sinewy finished. But you can skip that part if you like.
Step Six: I draped a piece of cloth over the shoulders to create a base to work up from. An old pair of cheese cloth curtains, but you could use an old t-shirt.
Step Seven: Create a hood with lighter cheese cloth material or t-shirt. Then add stockinette to add depth and texture and then some Powercotton draped over for extra texture.
Drape all the different textures through the boney fingers.
Step Eight: My favourite part. Dry brush using varnish and white powercolor. I then used a touch of silver colortricx in places. And for the hands and the face a touch of interference blue powder pigment from The Secret Art Loft range.

 I love to show how you can make a piece by re-purposing or building your own base. If you don’t wish to create the structure you could always buy a skeleton base instead and decorate that in the same way. I also forgot to add some paper decoration. I love this as texture it would work perfectly for this project. The great thing about Powertex is you can add to it when dry. So I can always go back and add some paper dec at a later date!
Don’t forget to share all your makes with us on Facebook in The Powertex Studio group or on the Powertex Addicts United page.
You can find me at Rosehart Studio on InstagramFacebook and Pinterest. Toodles Anna xXx