Powertex Stone Art Clay Pendant – Abigail Lagden

Powertex Stone Art jewellery pendant

Well, Happy New Year and I hope you had a lovely Christmas.

For my first blog of 2019 I thought I would take a festive left over and re-purpose it into something fun and funky for the new year.

So for this project, I started with an MDF bauble shape, some red Powertex, Stone Art, macrame cord and some texture mats.

Starting point

I began by mixing some stone art clay using the red Powertex and the Stone Art. When mixing small amounts of stone art clay I pour a little Powertex into a yogurt pot, then using an old paintbrush handle, I gradually mix in small handfuls of stone art. I keep adding stone art until the mixture thickens up and starts to pull away quite cleanly from the sides of the pot rather like a dough. It can then be turned out and a little more stone art worked in by hand to get a  consistency a little like polymer clay.

Part mixed clay
Part-mixed clay
Mixed clay
Clay ready to turn out

Once the clay was the right consistency, I rolled it out using an acrylic rolling pin to a thickness of approximately 3mm and a little larger than the size of the bauble. Then I positioned one of the texture mats on top and rolled the rolling pin over the top to impress the pattern into the clay.

Next I placed the bauble on top of the impressed clay and carefully cut around the edge using a craft knife to make a perfect circle of clay.

Bauble cut clay

I have recently acquired some macrame cord and love the simple texture of it when rolled into a coil, so I wanted to incorporate this into my project. To make it sit within the clay I needed to cut a circle out of it, so I used the lid of a fabric conditioner bottle like a pastry cutter to remove a circle of the clay.

Cut out circle

To attach the clay, I painted the bauble with Powertex before placing the clay on top.

Macrame cord was then coated in red Powertex and coiled to fit in the circular hole and also to create a border around the edge. The piece was then left to dry overnight.

Macrame cord added

Once dry, I sprayed brown bister over the clay to enhance the impressed texture and once this was dry I gently used a damp sponge to remove the bister from the uppermost surfaces and reveal the red colour again.

Bistered
Sprayed with brown bister
Cleaned Bister
Bister wiped back

Finally, I added colour by mixing Powerwax with yellow ochre, orange and moss green powercolor pigments and applying with a sponge.

The last step was to add a piece of ribbon through the hanging hole to make this piece into a beautiful wearable pendant.

Pendant

Pendant on driftwood

I hope you have enjoyed this project and you have been inspired to get creative this year. Please do share your makes with us through the Powertex Studio facebook group and let others know about the Powertex blog and the fabulous inspiration you can find here.

You can see more of my curious creations and the Powertex workshops I am running in County Durham, by popping by my Curiously Contrary facebook page or my website.

Until next time, here’s to an awesome 2019,

Abs xx

What a hoot!

What a Hoot! – by Abigail Lagden
I have loved the owl templates since Powertex first introduced them, so imagine my delight when I opened my design team parcel to find not just the owl, but lots of extra embellishments and shapes too in the Project Pack Owl. Here they all are:

 

I wanted my owl to have lots of texture and ruffles, so I also used the following bits I had lying around (very little gets thrown away in our house if it is deemed to be powertexable and I judge just about everything on a texture rating) :
  • Some part-shredded cardboard packaging (courtesy of my Powertex parcel!)
  • Some zig-zag corrugated cardboard which had been protective packaging around a plant pot
  • Some embroidered, stretchy peach fabric which those of you who have been to one of my workshops will know I affectionately call my ‘hideous fabric’ – I hate all skin coloured clothing and also know this would be a nightmare to sew with.
  • Some t-shirt material
  • Some flat cotton yarn
  • Some cotton lace with a circle design
  • Some elasticated, ruffled, cotton lace

This is how my owl was created:

1.   I used the wings as templates to draw around and cut the embossed paper to size. These were coated with bronze powertex and stuck onto the mdf wings and the top surface painted over.
2.  The owl shaped mdf base was fully painted with bronze powertex
3.  The ruffled lace was used in strips for the tail and the shredded cardboard laid across this to form the branch.
4.  One of the mdf rings was wrapped with the flat cotton yarn. One of the circles from the lace was cut out and attached to the other mdf ring.
5.  The corrugated cardboard was cut to make a shape to cover the owl’s belly. This was attached using powertex and painted over.
6.  The ‘hideous fabric’ was used to add some ruffled texture around the corrugated cardboard.
7.  T-shirt fabric was used on the face and ruffled around the two mdf rings which became its eyes.
8.  The feet, beak, button and butterflies were then positioned, and finally the gorgeous eye.

 

They say a picture is worth a thousand words… so I guess a video must be worth at least a thousand more. To prove that point (and also because it easier than stopping to take photos when ‘in the zone’) I have included a couple of time-lapse videos in this blog to show you my project’s emergence.
This one shows the owl being ‘built’.

And this video shows the colour being dry brushed onto the owl. I used different blends of burgundy, red ochre, yellow ochre, orange and white powercolor pigments, followed by some rich gold and bronze gold colortricx.

 

 

I hope you found the videos useful. You can see more of what I have been up to on my facebook page.

Take care. Until next time, Abs xx