The Northern Lights in Powertex

Aurora Borealis in Powertex
Northern Lights using Powertex

Designer: Donna Mcghie

In this article I will show you how to recreate my interpretation of the Northern Lights using Powertex.

The Northern Lights, or Aurora Borealis have always fascinated me. Like the ocean which was the inspiration for my last blog, they have that ethereal, slightly unworldly quality. They are a reminder of just how wonderful nature can be.

The lovely Tracey Evans at Powertex HQ asked if I could use lots of colour and texture in this article. I used the gorgeous pigments to create the fluorescent greens and pinks for the sky. Textured stone art clay was added to signify water.

One thing I hadn’t realised before doing some research for this article, is that the Northern Lights also occur during the daytime.  However the human eye is unable to see them at these times as the sun is too strong for them to show up.

Materials List:

Cover the canvas

Powertex base for Northern Lights Blog
I mixed Sherbert Dip Pigment with White Fabric Hardener to create a luminous base

I roughly covered my canvas using a mixture of Sherbert Dip Pigment and White Powertex for the sky, and White and Blue Powertex for the sea.

Create crackles

Northern lights sky created using powertex pigments
I also added some Violet Valentine to the sky

After spraying with Black Bister I blasted with a hair dryer to create crackles, and used a palette knife to scrape back and allow the yellows to shine through.

Stone Art sea

Powertex Clay added to canvas for Northern Lights Blog
I had added in some trees in the background here, but they didn’t look right so I faded them out using my pigments over the top.

I used segments of Stone Art clay to create the illusion of a choppy sea. Powertex pearl pigments reflect the colours in the sky.

Tree textures

Powertex acrylic ink used to create trees on canvas
Rather than having the trees all along the shoreline, which didn’t look right, I opted to use an asymmetrical composition instead.

Putting a cluster of trees fading downwards, I painted some corrugated cardboard with acrylic and used a stubby brush to indicate branches.

Highlight waves

Powertex Power Wax to give highlights to waves on Stone Art Clay
Make Stone Art clay by mixing a small quantity of Stone Art with some Powertex until it forms a dough like substance

I liked the way the Stone Art clay waves were curling and decided to highlight this using Powercolor Titanium White Pigment.

Powerwax sky

I used Powertex Powerwax for a deep shine on the canvas
Powerwax is perfect for adding extra depth and shine.

Finally I added some extra depth to the colours in the sky using Powerwax and pigment. I dip my finger in the wax, then the pigment and gently rub on in a circular movement.

Using the Powerwax in the final stage really helped to bring the picture to life. I was able to create beautiful swirling patterns in the sky using the amazingly vibrant Pearl Pigments which gave just the ethereal atmosphere I was hoping for.

Northern Lights in Powertex

My finished Northern Lights Powertex Canvas

That’s all from me for this month. I hope you have enjoyed this step by step article, and would love to see any Northern Lights inspired artwork you create over on our Facebook page. Please feel free to leave any comments, (especially nice ones).

If you are in the Southampton area and fancy coming along to a workshop you can find all my upcoming events on the blog section of www.artandmurals.co.uk. My Facebook page also has my events listed.

Take care, and see you next month 🙂

Upcycled Powertex pot

Designed by – Anna Emelia Howlett

Upcycled Powertex Pot by Anna Howlett

If you saw my shows with Powertex UK on HOCHANDA on May 3rd at 12pm and 4pm you would have caught my water pot. Made from my mum’s giant yoghurt pot I felt it was only fair to gift it to her. I hope you felt inspired to make your own upcycled powertex pot. Here are some tips and a materials list for how I made mine.

Materials

Stone art clay ammonite fossils
All pearl pigments from the party pearls pigment tray were used on the fossils to make them pop.

What to use to create an upcycled Powertex pot

Don’t forget Powertex can do many things. It acts like a primer, glue and paint. It will harden most fabrics and textiles. If you would like them to be water resistant you need to use fibres with at least 80% cotton in them, then cure for 3 weeks. For my upcycled Powertex pot I used black Powertex fabric hardener on different fabrics and textiles to cover the pot. Coated the mdf starfish with a mixture of black Powertex, 3d sand and balls. I created some stone art clay, pressed into the new super cute fossil moulds and stuck down with Powertex.

Dry brushing with White Powertex
Dry brush white Powertex on the black Powertex to pick out the detail.

How to make your pearl pigments pop

Leave your black base layer to harden by leaving to dry, either in the air or with a hair dryer. Then use the new White Powertex to dry brush over the top because this helps to bring out all the texture in the materials. It also gives a base for your colours to lie on top of. The pearl pigments are translucent and this technique allows them to show up and pop on a black base. This is because you’ve put the white layer down over the black.

Using pearl pigments to highlight
Pearl pigments

Share your upcycled Powertex pot with us

These make super water pots or plant pots. Why not give it a go! And don’t forget to share your makes in The Powertex studio, I love knowing I’ve inspired you to create your own works of art. Please leave a me a note in the comments if you have found this article useful. You can find me at Rosehart Studio. You might also be interested in my mixed media canvas project. Toodles Anna xXx

Upcycled Powertex Pot by Anna Howlett

Powertex Small Art Doll

Loving the Powertex Art Dolls by Annette Smyth

Powertex small art doll
Art doll

There are times in your life when you get so excited about starting a new art project that everything else just gets put on the back boiler. That’s exactly what happened when I got my hands on one of the new Powertex small art doll Template. These three new projects are launched on Hochanda on 1st February. They are going to be very popular as they offer a basis for so many styles of work.

I had the Powertex small art doll and straight away knew my girl had to be vintage and full of lovely Powertexture (ooh new word)!

So here’s a closer look at some of the elements in my project

Powertex small art doll
Tree bark effect

The backboard of my piece has a tree bark effect. To get this I used Easy 3D Flex and sprayed it with yellow bister then left it to dry overnight. The next day I used a damp sponge to remove some of the bister. Then drybrushed with Powercolor black and white.

Powertex small art doll
3D faces – plaster and rice paper
Powertex small art doll
Powertex small art doll

I wanted my girl to have a 3D face so I took one of the Powertex medium plaster faces and matched it (by size) to a face on the Victorian rice paper.

I carefully cut out the rice paper face. Applied Easy Coat Matt varnish to both the plaster and the back of the rice paper then carefully married the 2 together. Using a soft clean paintbrush to help push the eyes into the right place. Go very carefully as it is a delicate process.


Powertex small art doll
pigments and wax

On the limbs I used the Secret Art Loft Pearl pigments mixed into the Powerwax. This gives a beautiful blended finish with a soft sheen. The Powerwax is a really great way of adding layers of colour to any of your work.

I took the Powertex quote stencil and used the top quote by Robert Henri. By cutting this down into individual words and phrases I was able to place the words onto the individual areas more easily.

Powertex texture
Structure Paste words and texture

Along with the words, the texture on the wings and headdress were all created with Easy Structure Paste. It holds its shape brilliantly and takes colour really well.

Share you Powertex makes with us

Well I’m off now to have more fun with these gorgeous girlies, but can’t wait to see what you create with these wonderful templates. Don’t forget to post your makes on our facebook page.

Also checkout the blog posts from the other Design Team members – they’re amazing.

Find your local Powertex tutor

And if you’d like to attend an Art Doll workshop get in touch with your local tutor.

Catch my Powertex sculpture project from last month

Did you catch my article for last month, follow the hyperlink for another chance to have a look here. Until next time, Happy Creative Adventures……

Annette

Floral Trinket Box created (by Anne)

I have had a wire box frame in my stash for ages. Originally it had a woven straw covering that fell apart so I removed it with the intention of recovering it. It ended up as another ‘UFO’ (unfinished object) for years. I have finally dug it out and created this Powertex treated fabric box embellished with hand made fabric flowers. Now it’s a fabulous trinket box for storing some of my crafty treasures.
The bare wire frame is a strong construction – similar to the type of wire used to make coat hangers. It measures approx. 8 inches square across the top and 6 inches deep.
I used some recycled cotton bed sheets and treated them with Black Powertexto cover the box and lid. I lined the outer and inner panels to completely cover the wire frame. I gathered some cotton trims for the next stage; some crochet lace and a piece of gathered Broderie Anglaise.
I treated the crochet lace with Powertex and applied around the box base.
The gathered lace was applied around the lid. I also dug out some greyboard lazer cut foliage shapes to embellish the top. These were coated and stuck down with Powertex. When dry I started dry brushing over the surface using Easy Varnish and Silver Colotricx. Extra colour was applied to the foliage to make it stand out from the dry brushed background.
Here you can see the dry brushed lid next to the unpainted base. The dry brushing has emphasised the texture and added metallic highlights.
Next I made some fabric roses from 25mm and 15mm strips cut from recycled bedding. These were created using Ribbon Ruching Flower Combs from Gina B-Silkworks. Basically strips are marked out using the Flower Comb templates, a running stitch is sewn along the marked lines and the stitching is pulled up to gather and shape into a rose. I prepared my strips and treated with Powertex before pulling up the stitching. The Powertex holds and glues the gathering in place. I left the flowers to dry before adding to the box top.
I used one of my dies to cut a frame for the centre (Sizzix), applied to the top and finished in the same way as the greyboard foliage.
The flowers were dry brushed with Easy Varnish and Interference Lilac Pigment. Loving these new Pearl Pigment colours! Powertex was then used to glue down the roses to the centre. I added some ready made flower stamens around the group (purple), and some small ready made satin ribbon roses to the corners (Powertex treated and coloured).
Next I mixed some 3D Sand and Ballsinto Black Powertex and drizzled the mix around the flowers. A few untreated balls were also dropped into the wet Powertex. The untreated balls kept their original colour on the surface giving contrast with the black base. Once dry I coloured by brushing over the surface using Easy Varnish and Mojito Lime Pigment.
I also dry brushed a little of the Lilac pigment sparingly over the lace trims and used to colour some hand made air dry clay embellishments (created using a silicone mould from my stash) added to the box corners.
I used one of my large rubber stamps (lace design from Heartfelt Creations) to stamp some extra textural interest around the sides using Viola Metallic Acrylic Ink. Note: the fabric surface is already quite textured and not very flat so the stamping does not give a clear impression of the design but just adds a little more depth and interest to the surface.
I hope that you like my new treasure box.
Hugs, Anne xxx.