Christmas Powertex bauble

Designer: Jinny Holt

For this months article, we were asked to follow another design team member’s tutorial. Brilliant idea but having to decide which one to follow was no easy task, I spent ages looking through the last couple of years and finally decided that I would follow Anna’s Christmas Powertex bauble blog. You can find that HERE.

Materials list

Powertex supplies for a Christ mas bauble
Ingredients to create bauble

Mixing texture paste

Mixing Powertex fabric hardener with textures
Mixing up

I started by mixing Easy 3d Flex and some 3D balls and 3D sand with some Ivory Powertex. I also added a few drops of water.

TIP: I changed from what Anna used, she used Easy structure and I wanted to use the 3D flex as it I love using it.

Adding fabric

Draping fabric around the ball
Looking good

I immersed some thin strips of stockinette into my mixture making sure the material got a good coating. I then painted a layer of the mixture, leaving off the balls, all over my polystyrene ball. This gives the material a key to adhere to. I then draped the mixed material around the ball.

Covering the bauble

Coating the bauble with Powertex textures.
Material and mixture added

I added the rest of the mixture with a plastic palette knife to fill all the left over gaps and left to dry.

TIP: Like Anna, I also used a jewellery finding. I wrapped a bit of wire around the finding and stuck it in my ball for a loop.

Spray with Bister

Hmm I did not take a photo of this step as I must have got a tad excited with what I was doing. I sprayed the dried Polystyrene ball with the blue and brown bister sprays. Then I wiped it back with a baby wipe and let that dry.

TOP TIP: You can speed up the drying time with a hairdryer, if you don’t want to wait. When I use Easy 3D flex I prefer to let it dry naturally as you get amazing cracks.

Dry brushing

Dry brush the textures with Limoncello Gold pigment and Easy Varnish
Bottom of bauble

I now dry brushed with the Easy Varnish using the Limoncello gold this step makes your piece pop and really stand out.

Adding the star

Adding the star to the Powertex bauble
Adding the star

For the star I used up all the left over mixture from step one and added it to the wooden star to give it a new look. I had some course sand in my stash and mixed in that to give it a different texture. Transparent Powertex is used to adhere it down to my bauble.

Finishing touches

As it is a Christmas bauble, I felt mine needed a bit of sparkle for when the Christmas lights hit it. I used some glass gems and bling in coordinating colours.

Adding some pieces of metallic foil to the star and stockinette gave that bit of extra bling. I find sometimes that it is knowing when to stop adding!

Powertex Christmas bauble by Jinny Holt
Powertex Christmas Bauble by Jinny Holt

So Anna, thank you for inspiring me to recreate this article.

 If you would like more Powertex inspiration, you can find loads of eye candy on…

PINTEREST

THE POWERTEX STUDIO

POWERTEX ADDICTS

And you can find me at MUMS SHED 

I look forward to seeing your creations. It would be lovely if you could leave a comment and maybe even share but most of all be inspired and have fun creating.

~LIVE~LOVE~LAUGH~CREATE~

Jinny

Rusty letter art

The Secret Art Box – August 2019

Designer – Kore Sage

The August Secret Art Box included a personalised initial in mdf, a stencil, papers, a quote stamp and textured fabrics. Also Lead Powertex fabric hardener and colour pigments were in Aqua ink and Blue Bister granules. There was so much in the box to use but I knew straight away that I wanted to use Rusty Powder with the mdf, ink and Bister to create rusty letter art.

Powertex UK secret art box august 2019
Powertex UK Secret Art Box August

Materials list

  • Tag
  • Lead Powertex Fabric Hardener
  • Printed papers
  • Pieces of fabrics
  • Mdf letter
  • Aqua ink spray
  • Bister granules
  • Powercotton

Optional and other supplies

Powertex Rusty Letter wall art
Rusty Letter Art by Kore Sage

1. Make a start

Step 1
Step 1

Laying down the first textures with printed papers and Lead Powertex Fabric Hardener to cover the canvas.

2. Create background textures

Step 2 Easy Structure
Step 2

Use Easy Structure with a plastic palette knife through the stencil. Clean your stencil straight away.

3. Build fabric layers

Step 3 adding fabric with Powertex
Step 3

I added fabric textures to build up a background for the mdf letter. Lead Powertex hardens and adheres the fabric. Use a hairdryer to dry.

4. Add mdf letters and shapes

Step 4 Adding MDF with White Powertex
Step 4

To create depth I used White Powertex to paint and glue the mdf letter and shapes. I painted it lightly over most of the background. Dry with a hairdryer.

TIP: Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener will also work well if you don’t have White.

5. Spray Aqua ink

Step 5 Spray on Aqua Acrylic ink
Step 5

Spray the Aqua ink generously over the textures, let it pool, drip and run off to the side.

6. Add Rusty Powder

Mix up 1 tbsp Transparent Powertex with a little white vinegar and 1/2 – 1 tbsp Rusty Powder. Pour onto the letter, background and fabrics. (It will look grey and the rust will take a few hours to form.)

TIP: For a thicker rust mixture add 3D Sand or Small balls

7. Using Bister granules

Add spots of Transparent Powertex and sprinkle Bister granules onto wet areas. Spray with water and vinegar spray so the colour runs.

TIP: Using white vinegar in the water spray alters the colour of the Bister and encourages the rust.

Step 6 Sprinkle on Blue Bister granules
Step 6 and 7
Step 7 Rusty Powder
Step 6 and 7 rusted

Powercotton vines

Step 8 Powercotton
Step 8

I used Powercotton strands coated with White Powertex to look like vines around the letter.

Brush up highlights

Step 9 White Powertex Highlights
Step 9

White Powertex is dry brushed on highlights over the whole canvas using a flat brush.

Finishing touches

I repeated the Rusty Powder and Bister granules until I was happy with the contrast. Highlighting with White or Ivory Powertex at the end just lifts the letters away from the background. You can layer up as much as you like.

Powertex rusty letter art by Kore Sage
Powertex Rusty Letter Art by Kore Sage

There’s so much left in the Secret Art Box I’ll be making more with these supplies. Tutor Gill has also used this month’s subscription box here.

Keep an eye on The Powertex Studio and my Facebook Page where I’ll be posting my Powertex art. Join us at Powertex Addicts United where you can share your makes.

You can find all the details on the Powertex UK website for your own Powertex subscription box, along with many of these supplies.

Until next time, make some time to let your art out,

Kore x

New Metallic Tag project pack

Powertex UK New Metallic tag project pack

Designer – Tracey Evans

There’s a new project pack available from Powertex UK and Tracey has a tutorial for you to create this gorgeous metallic tag with a beautiful mdf letter, that’s personalised to you.

Powertex UK New Metallic tag project pack
Personalised Metallic Tag project by Tracey Evans

Tutorial

Tracey Evans, the creative director at Powertex UK uses Lead Powertex Fabric Hardener and the new Aqua acrylic ink in this tag. Use the fantastic textured fabric to create a background for your mdf letter and Powercotton for detail. Finish off your project with metallic pigments.

Metallic tutorial by Tracey Evans

Get your Metallic Tag project pack

If you would like to try the Metallic Tag Project Pack, you can find all the details on the website. The pack is available with or without Powertex and you can choose the letter you wish too.

If you have some Powertex creations to share we’d love to see them in the Powertex Studio on Facebook. Join us in Powertex Addicts United for inspiration and tips for getting the most out of your Powertex products.

Powertex Dog from recycled items

Designer – Jill Cullum

Powertex is at it’s best when used to upcycle/recycle items we would normally pop in the bin. It is perfect for transforming everyday objects into a sculpture, either for the house or garden.

Powertex 3d animal dog from recycling
Powertex dog by Jill Cullum

When I was asked to make a 3d animal from recycled materials, I began saving all sorts of items that would normally have been thrown out. Unfortunately when I came to start the project Karl had tidied up and thrown it all out! A visit to the loft was called for where I found an old hearth brush. Perfect for a tail – and just the job for a dog.

Animals are not something I make very often, but once started I enjoyed the process. As usual, I learnt quite a lot whilst making this project and am already looking forward to making more.

Materials List

Let’s Create a Dog

Gather your items to make the shape

Materials for a powertex dog
Step 1

After I took the photograph of all my pieces ready to upcycle, I added some old table stands which were ideal to use for legs.

Building the main body structure

building the dog structure from recycling
Step 2

Using masking tape, secure the legs to the hearth brush. Add the pie dishes over the side, using paper/bubble wrap to pad them out.

Adding detail

corrugated card ears
Step 3

Cut some ear shapes and feet, out of corrugated cardboard. Put these to one side.

Eyes

eyes from jar lids
Step 4

Cover the jar lids with masking tape, forming texture as you do this by crumpling it as you press it down.

Putting him all together

Step 5

Secure the eyes and ears to the main body. Cover the whole animal in masking tape. Leaving the ‘tail’ untouched.

Adding the fur

decorating the recycled items with powertex
Step 6

Using Powertex and material of your choice, cover the structure, creating texture for the coat of the dog. Using Powercolour dry-brush your dog.

Finishing touches

I also just had to add some googly eyes to give him some character. He still didn’t look finished so added a piece of lace using red Powertex, to create a tongue.

I hope you have enjoyed this article and it has inspired you to create your own animals. It is good to recycle and as crafters we have lots of items we can use.

Abigail Lagden has a great blog on how to use up old paint brushes to create a lion sculpture.

Let us see what you make by posting them over on the Powertex Studio. Bye for now. Jill x

Feeling Grey? It’s not a bad thing with Powertex.

Feeling grey? Using Lead grey Powertex Fabric hardener by Abigail Lagden

Feeling grey? One of the things that people often comment on when they see my creations, is the colours. Words such as rich, deep, bright and vibrant are common.

Therefore, they are often surprised to hear that almost all of them are made with either the bronze (brown) or the lead (grey) Powertex universal medium as the base colour.

Why Bronze & Lead for the Base Colour?

1. Final Colour Considerations

Bronze and lead are both neutral colours and therefore will look good when dry brushed using any of the powercolor pigments. In fact they are perfect for my signature rainbow colours created using Powercolor pigments!

Rainbox fairy house by Curiously Contrary
Rainbow fairy house with bronze base

If you start with a bold base colour such as red, blue, green, etc you have already limited what colours will work well on top and the final pieces can look a bit ‘flat’ and lacking in depth.

Fabric sculpted bottles by Curiously Contrary
The bottle on the left has green Powertex as the base colour, the middle bottle has black and the bottle on the right has a terracotta base. I think the middle bottle appears to have much more depth than the other two which look a little ‘flat’.

2. Depth vs Brightness

The thing I love most about fabric sculpting is the textures and depth that can be created. To create the illusion of greater depth, the colours within the folds of the fabric should be as dark compared to the top of the folds.

Therefore black and bronze Powertex will give you the appearance of greater depth. My preference is bronze as I like the warmth that it creates.

Rainbow dragon treasure chest by Abigail Lagden
This dragon’s treasure chest uses a bronze base colour, creating lots of depth.

Feeling grey?

To achieve a slightly lighter/brighter feel I use the lead Powertex. Whilst it loses just a little of the depth that bronze creates, the lighter base colour lifts the overall brightness of the piece.

Sea themed treasure chest by Curiously Contrary using Lead Grey Powertex Fabric Hardener
This sea-themed treasure chest has a lead base colour giving it a lighter, brighter feel.

Here are a few more of my creations to demonstrate the colours that can be achieved using black, bronze and grey Powertex with powercolor pigments :

Blue bird box by Curiously Contrary
Bird box created using lead Powertex with ultramarine blue and turquoise Powercolor pigments
Bird box created using bronze Powertex and a rainbow of Powercolor pigments
Feeling grey? Using Lead grey Powertex Fabric Hardener by Abigail Lagden
Business card holder created for ‘The Ugly Duckling’ using lead Powertex with lilac and ultramarine blue Powercolor pigments
Custom made business card holder made using black Powertex with red and burgundy Powercolor pigments

See more uses of bronze and lead Powertex in my previous articles. I used Bronze Powertex for my Steampunk Top Hat and lead Powertex for my Storage Caddy.

What are you favourite colour combinations? Let us know in the comments.

Curiously Contrary

Many of my creations are available to purchase and I also make customised pieces and take commissions. If you’d like to see where in the north east of England I’ll be with my creations over the summer, pop across to my Curiously Contrary website or facebook page.

Until next time, Abs xx

(Please note that the images I have shared in this article are of my own designs and are there to illustrate my points around colour. Please respect the time and creativity that goes into generating original designs by not recreating these pieces for sale or for other commercial purposes. If my designs inspire you to create something similar, that is fantastic, and if you are sharing them online, it would be lovely if you would acknowledge my designs (and the Powertex Magazine) as your source of inspiration.)

Powertex planets canvas art

Designer – Kore Sage

Powertex planets are a fun and easy canvas project to try. It doesn’t take much in the way of supplies and if you’ve used stencils or masks before you’re half way there! With Powertex you really can use basic techniques for amazing results.

Powertex planets canvas art by Kore Sage using Blue Powertex and Bister sprays
Powertex planets canvas art by Kore Sage

Materials list

  • Canvas – I used an inexpensive rectangular canvas
  • Blue and Ivory Powertex Fabric Hardener
  • Ready Made Bister sprays in Black, Red, Yellow and Green
  • Stiff cardboard to cut own circular masks
  • Hairdryer

Prepare your canvas and card circles

Prep your canvas with Blue Powertex Fabric Hardener and while it’s drying cut your circle masks. Draw around plates or lids and carefully cut out. Keep both parts.

Prepare your canvas and cut card circle masks.
Step 1 Preparing your canvas and circles

Spray the background

Arrange your circular masks. Darken the background with Black Bister Spray. Vary the amount around the canvas. Leave this to dry naturally.

Spray the background with Bister spray in Black
Spray the background with Black Bister

Paint the planets

Swap the mask for the stencil on each planet and paint the circle with a layer of Ivory Powertex, not too thin. Do one at a time!

Swap to the stencil and apply a layer of Ivory Powertex
Swap to the stencil and apply a layer of Ivory Powertex

Spray the Bister

While the Powertex is still wet, leave the stencil in place and spray generously with Bister in your chosen colour. Notice I’ve protected the canvas.

Spraying Bister onto wet Powertex
Spray Bister onto wet Powertex

Create the Bister crackles

Heat the Bister with a hairdryer until cracks start to form in the surface. A heatgun or tool can be too hot for this. Repeat these steps for all your planets.

Using a hairdryer to create Bister crackles
Heat the Bister until crackles form

Starry night

Put half a teaspoon of Ivory Powertex on a plate and use a very wet paintbrush to splatter it across the surface for stars. I had a practice on paper first!

Use a wet paintbrush to spray on stars with Ivory Fabric Hardener
Adding stars with Ivory Powertex

Finishing touches

One of my planets had smeared a lot so I tidied it up with a bit of Blue Powertex and Black Bister when it was dry. I didn’t worry too much about the others and I thought they looked pretty good. I love the blue Powertex coming through the Black Bister too!

Powertex planets canvas by Kore Sage
Powertex planets canvas by Kore Sage

Top Tips for Powertex planets

Each planet will take a while to dry so be careful when masking the rest of your canvas. I used a piece of printer paper held near my planets while I sprayed them. Using more than one colour of Bister on a planet to give it a darker side helps them look dimensional. Try Easy Structure paste or 3d balls to add texture before you add Bister.

Thanks for reading my blog today. I hope you will have a go at painting your own Powertex planets! If you do, please share your art in the Powertex Facebook group as we love to see what you make.

If you like to see more of my Powertex art, you might like my under the sea mixed media project here on the magazine or you can follow me on Facebook or on my website where I love to share my Powertex tips and art.

Until next time, make time to let your art out!

Powertex Dragon Easter Eggs

Designer ~Jinny Holt

Baby dragon encased in a Powertex egg

Why Powertex Dragon Easter Eggs?

Well, Easter is upon us and this year no chocolate eggs for myself. And these eggs have no calories in them. As some of you may know I do love working with Powertex. I especially love making these baby Dragon eggs. For my article I wanted to share with you some of my baby Powertex dragon Easter eggs I’ve created. I love dragons and I love how using Powertex makes these eggs one of a kind pieces of artwork. I hand sculpt my baby dragons from Polymer clay. Depending on how these look and what colour they are depends on how my Powertex egg will evolve.

As you can see each one has their own personalities. Working with Powertex has a way of bringing these creations to life. Pop on over to POWERTEX UK h to get a bottle of Powertex and start making unique pieces of artwork.

My favorite Technique

When I create these baby Dragon eggs, I almost always reach for EASY 3D FLEX as it creates beautiful textures. It adds depth and interest to every piece I create. It also makes the most wonderful cracks, if you desire the cracked effect.

Have I left you inspired?

I hope this Powertex Dragon Easter Eggs article has you inspired and wanting to go open that bottle of Powertex. If you need more inspiration or would like to showcase your finished pieces share them in THE POWERTEX STUDIO .

You can find more of my work at MUMS SHED

Did you catch any articles from last month? Click here to be really inspired by what Powertex can do.

Thank you for taking time to read my article, I really do hope you enjoyed it and if so, please feel free to leave a comment.

Live~love~Laugh~Create

Jinny