Adjustable Kanzashi Flower Ring (by Anne)

Today I am sharing a pretty little adjustable Kanzashi flower ring created using fine printed cotton fabric which has been treated with Transparent Powertex to stiffen and protect it. Treating with Powertex adds strength and protects against dirt. Ideal for jewellery pieces.
There are lots of videos on YouTube showing Kanzashi flower making but most are using synthetic ribbons which are joined and sealed by melting. I used instructions from Gina-B Silkworks. Gina’s method is the traditional Japanese way using natural fabrics (silk or cotton). Being natural fibres these little flowers are simply ideal for treating with Powertex. Ready-made silk flowers could work very well too.

Really pretty and comfortable to wear (sorry that my hands are older crafters hands and not modelling quality – tee hee).

The ring is adjustable so easy fitting.
I coloured the back to match the wire colour. You can also see the adjustable ring form more easily in this pic – the backing and flower being secured to one of the flat wire coils.

Note: One thing to consider when using transparent Powertex is how it will affect the colour of the fabric. It will considerably darken many fabrics, giving them the appearance of their colour when wet. Always test out a spare scrap first so as not to be disappointed. The printed cotton that I used here changed very little in colour so I was really pleased with the result.

Tools and Materials:

  • Transparent Powertex
  • Powertex Easy Structure
  • Kanzashi Flower Making Starter Kit (includes instructions, fabrics and starch glue)
  • 2.1mm aluminium wire (Artistic Wire – Anodized Rose)
  • Ring mandrel
  • Round nosed jewellery pliers and flush wire cutters
  • Nylon jewellery hammer and steel block
  • PVA glue (fast grab/tacky glue), Gemtac Glue (sticks glass, plastic or metal gems & beads to fabric)
  • Small metal brad (for flower centre)
  • Small wooden flat backed dome (or use a small disc of thick card/MDF)
  • Starlight acrylic paint (or varnish to match with wire)

How it was made:

  1. I got the Kanzashi flower supplies from Gina-B Silkworks and used directions in her starter kit to make the seven petal rainbow flower. Basically little fabric squares are folded to make petals. The raw edges of the petals are then placed in thick Kanzashi starch to hold their shape while making up the petals and building the flower. The petals are then glued to a base piece of cotton using PVA glue and left to dry overnight. Excess fabric on the base is then snipped away. I glued a small metal brad into the centre with Gemtac glue. Sorry that I am unable to give full instructions here for the flower as the specifics of this flower design belong to Gina.
  2. To make the adjustable ring I wrapped the wire around a ring mandrel and tapped the wire lightly with the hammer to work harden the ring structure. A nylon hammer helps protect against stripping off the coloured coating.
  3. I trimmed the wire and made a small curl on one side using the round nosed pliers. On the other side I made a larger curl, big enough to sit the flower onto the front and the wooden cabochon onto the back. I worked hardened and slightly flattened the wire curls using the hammer and steel block.
  4. I added a coat of clear Powertex to the back/base of the flower and wooden cabochon and left until touch dry. I then added another coat of Powertex (as a glue) and used Powertex Easy Structure to fill the voids in the wire curl, attaching the wooden cabochon to the back and flower to the front of the larger wire curl, and left it to cure overnight. The Easy Structure paste makes a nice solid bridge holding everything securely onto the back and front of the wire curl. A little Stone Art Clay would also work. Note: If you don’t have a suitable wooden cabochon a thick card/board or MDF shape could be substituted. I would advise an absorbent natural material for a strong bond with the Powertex. It also needs to be smooth so as not to scratch or irritate the skin when wearing.
  5. I then painted the cabochon and flower with Transparent Powertex, working it well into the fabric flower and crevices with a brush. Tip: If you find that you have big blobs or pools of Powertex use a piece of cotton rag to lightly dab and mop up the excess, or it can dry giving shiny blobby areas which will spoil the natural look and texture of the fabric flower. Leave to dry.
  6. Finally I painted the back of my cabochon attachment and flower base using Starlight acrylic paint. The colour match was simply perfect for the metallic pink wire that I used. If you are using copper, silver or gold plated wires you could paint with Colortricx pigment and Easy Varnish instead (to coordinate with your wire).

Powertex treatment has made this delicate fabric flower ring much more robust and protected against dirt – a more functional piece of jewellery. For further protection and full waterproofing you could add a final coat of Easy Varnish.

Nefertiti’s Collar

Powertex – Nefertiti’s Collar

Hi all,  I thought it was time to share a couple of my projects from Powertex UK’s recent Egyptian themed shows on Hochanda.

So today I’m going to share how I made Nefertiti’s gemstone collar.  Not real gemstones of course but made with Black Powertex and  3D sand.  I mixed the Powertex and Sand to a thick paste and pushed into a cabochon mould.  These take a few days to dry so make them a few days before you want to make your collar.

I then worked Ivory Powertex into some woven cotton tape and wrapped this very tightly around the collar base.  

Make sure you overlap the edges evenly as they will form part of the texture of the finished piece.

Tip: these collars have a habit of slipping forward so you might want to drill a hole on each end to fix a jump ring, some chain and a nice clasp to for peace of mind.  I didn’t but I really wish I had as the weight pulled it forward even more.



Next I added some sand to a little Powertex to make a paste and put a small dollop onto the back of each faux gemstone and then pushed these into the now dry collar.

Don’t add too much or it oozes out but the addition of the paste really help grab the weight of the faux stones onto the near vertical collar and made it easier to work with.


Once the stones were in place, I worked some more ivory Powertex into some paper string.  

I love using paper string where I want a twisted rope effect, it’s light weight and absorbs the Powertex so well.

Starting on the lower edge of each stone, I tightly wrapped the string around to give the effect of a twisted wire setting.

Cut the end of at the opposite lower edge of each wrap.


I then coiled a little of the string and pressed one end onto the collar at the our edge and threaded under and over each stone finish with another coil on the opposite side.

Next I painted a thick layer of ivory powertex over the whole piece apart from the stones.  

I then sprayed the whole piece with brown bister and dried with the hairdryer, this added another layer of texture and in some places where a bister split was achieved.  

One it was dry I used red ochre, ultramarine blue and dark green Powercolor pigments which I mixed with Easy Varnish and built up colour on the stones.  

I was very careful to make sure the colour didn’t go onto the rope.  I then mixed up Rich Gold Colortrix with more Easy Varnish and quite heavily painted the rope setting and less heavily on the remaining areas.  There’s a useful Pigment Tray now that has a small quantity of pigments to help build up your pallete.


As a finishing touch I added some flat back crystals from my stash in the same colours as the stones.
Now here’s a little tease, these stones have been enhanced even further, so check back late September/early October and see how these stones look even more realistic! 

That’s all for now, let us see your makes on Powertex Addicts United.

Keep creating!
Fi xx

Jurassic Tool Time

Jurassic Stencil

 
With less than a week to go before Powertex UK is back on Hochanda (Tracey launches a super duper ODS 8pm on Wednesday 5th April) I just had to give the brand new rather gorgeous and highly detailed Powertex Jurassic stencil a try.  Honestly you seriously need this stencil in your life!
 
Now while I will be back on air demonstrating some more jewellery ideas on Thursday 6th using the same products as Tracey, I thought I’d decorate a rather nifty wooden tool rack that a very dear friend gifted me a while a go.
 
The result of my crafty bit of playtime is this twin look piece. 
 
Hope you like it..
 
Fi x

Powertex Jewellery Hochanda Followup

Powertex Jewellery Hochanda Follow Up

Hope you have got your Powertex out and been creating.  If anyone was inspired by the jewellery designs on our last shows on Hochanda, then this follow up is for you.

I have completed the pendant I demo’ed and thought I would show you the finishing stages.

First I checked over the back and sides of the bezel. Even 10 days after the show I was able to clean this up. I gently rubbed with a baby wipe until the dried Powertex was soft then gently scraped with an old bank card then wiped clean.

I checked the piece all over to see if there were any sharp edges, this is essential so that it is comfortable to wear.  I gently rubbed sharp areas with an emery board.

Next I added a layer of Powertex red ochre pigment blended with some Powertex Easy Varnish colouring most of the peiece.

Then I added a tiny bit of Powertex white pigment to the red ochre and dry brushed to add highlights.  I then cleaned my brush before adding even fewer highlights with plain white pigment.
Finally I added one of the cords.
And that’s it finished and ready to wear!
Share your Powertex Jewellery with us on Powertex Addicts or on my Facebook page
See you next time….
Fi