A fishy tale

Hello Powertex Lovers!,
I would like to share a project that I put together for Tracey and Anna’s show on Hochanda.
As you can see I have used the MDF fish that was part of a kit on the show.  It was an excellent canvas to show some of the brilliant effects that Powertex can produce.

Firstly I put the few pieces of the MDF kit together which is simple and explained on the packaging. I went on to paint the MDF in ivory Powertex to give it a base and then in certain places I adhered 3D structure paste where I wanted to add texture and dimension. 

I have been collecting egg shells over the last few weeks thinking that I would want to use them for something in the near future (as we all do with odd bits and pieces I’m sure!) and this project was shouting out for them to be used to give a scale like appearance. I broke the shells up quite small and then embedded them into the paste which held them perfectly. 
I also wanted to include some bits and pieces which would probably be found on the sea bed so I included shells, which I distressed, netting (which had oranges in from Asda!), sand and a little bottle with a message in.
Natural brown, yellow and green Bisters were used to add a base colour and then dry brushing with a variety of power colours.

Oh and don’t forget the googly eye to add a bit of fun!
It was a great project to have a play with and you can achieve many other equally eye catching results with this MDF blank canvas.
Thankyou for popping by and hope this project has given you some inspiration for one of yours that you may do. Don’t forget to save the egg shells for excellent texture!
Bye for now
Jo 🙂

Thou shall have a fishy

So this was a really fab project. It’s always fun to create something out of the box with products you wouldn’t have thought of using before. This was a piece I created for a sample to be shown on Hochanda. I had a nice mix of Powertex UK mdf shapes and embellishments and lace to use. And this is what I came up with…
As usual I gave thought to the layout of the piece. This did change as I progressed but it’s much nicer to have a dry run before everything gets messy and covered in Powertex.

 


Top Tip: When you’re making your stone art clay make a job lot of moulded embellishments. This saves you more time to play and concentrate on your project when you come to it. I’ve used the daisy moulds from Powertex UK I just love them!
https://www.powertex.co.uk/moulds/367-fossil-mould.html

Then I took some structure paste and using some of my templates including my Powertex UK arty quote stencil, I randomly stenciled the base. Once dry I had a play with some lace and textured material to give the base some more depth. I love the woven mesh, it has to be my favourite product and you can find some here in this pack:
https://www.powertex.co.uk/additional-products/238-mixed-media-texture-pack-2.html
Once happy with the layout and composition I coated the whole thing in Ivory Powertex and I totally forgot to take a picture of it. But then sprayed with black bistre. And when I spray my bistre I like to completely saturate the piece.

 

 

 

Top Tip: I added some bling. I would recommend you do this right at the end with some transparent Powertex as when you come to dry brushing you tend to go over the gems and then you have to try and scrape the varnish and pigment off.
I used a damp sponge to take some of the black away and leave whiter areas in places. This look gives a smoother, softer finish than just using straight black powertex. Then it was on to dry brushing with yellow ochre, red ochre, and burdgundy powercolor with varnish and then some gold and pearl colortricx and varnish to add a bit or sparkle.
Enjoy and have fun creating. ❤ Toodle Pip Anna xXx ❤

 

 

 

 

Wire Wrapping a Powertex Ammonite

Wow what a busy start to the new year and what a fun one too!

 

Did you see Tracey and I sharing some of our Powertex ideas on HOCHANDA on 5th/6th April?  Did you get the fabulous one day special and Jurassic Jewels kits? If so then maybe you were tempted to make yourself some Powertex Ammonites using Tracey’s new sand technique and some of my jewellery.

So as promised, here are the steps and they are really simple and you don’t need to have any previous experience to get started.  Here goes…

Step 1

Gather together a finished Powertex Ammonite, 0.9 and 0.5 wire and beads from the Jurassic Jewels kit.
Tools: flush cutters, round nose and chain or flat nose pliers and some medium grade sand paper.

In thise project I am using a medium ammonite.  I have also created it in ivory and not added pigment. If you do want colour add it before wrapping.


Step 2

Use the sandpaper to gently rub off any sharp areas and smooth the back and sides of the ammonite.

Pull of 5 x 30 cm lengths of the 0.9mm wire making sure you follow the direction of the wire (this is your structural wire). Cut 1mtr of the 0.5mm (this is your wrapping wire).  Use the natural cure of the coils to your advantage.

Hold all wires in your non dominant hand and keeping the wires side by side, leave approximately a 4-5cm tail and in the centre of the wires make 7 wraps on the wire bundle, keeping some tension and keeping the wire flat.

Once the wrap is complete and with both end to the inside curve of the wire, trim the ends and firmly squeeze with the chain or flat nose pliers.

Moving 22mm along from the end of the first wrap, repeat making a second 2-wraps and then repeat on the other side of the central wrap.

These measurements are for the medium sized ammonite and you will need to adjust if you are wrapping either the small or large ammonites.

The wire now look like this one on the right.

Step 4

Hold the ammonite and gently coax the wire around the shape of the ammonite with the central wrap opposite the outer edge as shown here.

Holding the ammonite and wire wrap firmly with your non dominant hand, use your pliers to push the wires into the right angle of the ammonite.

Step 5

Gently pull forward the front wire of the anti-clockwise wires and encourage it to work into a curve stroking your fingers along its lenght, the warmth and direction from your fingers will help with this.  Add 3 off the little beads and then turn a neat loop and continue to curve following the inner curves of the ammonote.

Use the front wire of the clockwise wires to make 2-3 wraps around all wires to secure.

nb: DON’T CUT ANY OF THE STRUCTURE WIRES

Step 6

With your fingers or flat nose pliers and from the middle, gently pull the top outer wire just over the front endge of the ammonite on each side of the wire wrapped groupings, repeating on the back.

Try to make them as even as you can but work with the shape of the ammonite. Press firmly on the outer edges so the wires lie flat. repeat so all 4 sections are wrapped and the ammonite sits firmly within.

Step 7

Next you need to bend the wires comping anti clockwise so they fit closely along the back from top edge to bottom edge where the centre wires.

Tip: I find it easier to use my flat nose pliers to turn the wire and then use the back of the plier to press down so the wire sits nice and flat.

Step 8

Use some of the 0.5mm wrapping wire to secure the structure wires either side of the bottom central wrap.  These structure wires will become the bale on which you will thread your cord.

I continued up the length of the wire after I had bent the bale into shape so I suggest you leave the wire attached in case you choose to do the same.

Using your flat nose pliers to hold the structural wires bend the wires forwards 1cm up from the base.

Then holding the wires together bend down approx 8mm from the first bend and so that all wires are sitting over the front of the ammonite.

Leave as they are while we work on the tail wires.

Step 9

The wire coming clock wise of the bottom of the ammonitte now need gently curving, these are the tail wires. Do this with your fingers, gently stroking them all together between your thumb and forefinger and in a clockwise direction.

Trim the wires so that the front wire is shortest and back wire is longest.  I made mine around 8mm shorter than the one it was next to.

On the short front wire add 5 beads. Turn a loop so they don’t drop off.  Continue the coil trapping a bead in the coil and leaving the others to find their own level.

Repeat this on each wire, adding 7 beads to wire 2, 9 beads to wire 3 and 11 beads to the longest wire.  Trapping a few beads in the tighter coils as shown in the photo below.

Step 10

Hold the wrapped ammonite in your no dominant hand and use your flat nose pliers to make a couple of bend in the rear wires, this helps give strength and tension.

You can see here where I have done a basket weave wrap on the back of the bale.

Turning to the front, trim the bale wire so the centre wire is a little longer than the other two.  Turn a loop on the four outer wires.

Thread 3 beads on the centre wire and turn a loop to secure them

And that’s it!

Here is the finished Powertex Ammonite Wire Wrapped Pendant.

 

 

All you need to do now is make a corded necklace that you can hang it from.
This is a very basic wrap and there are lots of ways you can change the bale, or even leave off the bale and using powertex and a little bit of kitchen paper or fabric add a brooch back.
Look out for more tips soon on finishing your Powertex circles jewellery pieces.
Have fun and make sure your share your creations with us over on Powertex Addicts United we love to see your makes!
Unitl next time… Fi xx